July 2015 Briefing - Emergency Medicine

Share this content:

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Emergency Medicine for July 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

AMA Wants Doctor Input on EHRs, Meaningful Use

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American Medical Association (AMA) is encouraging clinicians to share their perspectives on electronic heath records (EHRs) and the meaningful use program.

breaktheredtape.org
More Information

U.S. Health Spending Projected to Rise 5.8 Percent By 2024

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 2014 to 2024, U.S. health spending growth is projected to increase by about 6 percent, according to a report published online July 28 in Health Affairs.

Abstract
Full Text

Recalcitrant Back Pain Could Be Vertebral Osteomyelitis

THURSDAY, July 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Vertebral osteomyelitis should be considered in cases of back or neck pain unresponsive to conservative measures and elevated inflammatory markers with or without fever, according to new guidelines from the Infectious Disease Society of America published online July 29 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

Abstract
Full Text

Inflammation Could Up Risk of Hearing Loss With Antibiotic

THURSDAY, July 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Inflammation from bacterial infections may increase susceptibility to aminoglycoside-linked hearing impairment by increasing the uptake of the antibiotic into the inner ear, according to experimental research. The findings were published in the July 29 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

U.S. Medical Groups Fighting Prescription Opioid Abuse

THURSDAY, July 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Led by the American Medical Association (AMA), a group of 27 major U.S. medical organizations are banding together to tackle the continuing epidemic of opioid abuse.

More Information - AMA
More Information - ACOG
More Information - AAFP

Tamsulosin Could Help Passage of Larger Kidney Stones

THURSDAY, July 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Tamsulosin can boost the passage of large kidney stones, but not small ones, according to a study published online July 17 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Docs Report Patient Safety Often at Risk in ER to Inpatient Handoff

THURSDAY, July 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians report that patient safety is often at risk during the emergency department admission handoff process due to ineffective communication. The findings were published online July 22 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Early Surgery Tied to Increased Mortality in Polytraumatized

WEDNESDAY, July 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For polytraumatized patients, surgery for thoracic spine trauma within 72 hours of trauma is associated with increased mortality, according to a study published in the Aug. 1 issue of The Spine Journal.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

2015 MOC Program Expected to Cost $5.7 Billion Over 10 Years

WEDNESDAY, July 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The 2015 version of the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) maintenance-of-certification (MOC) program is expected to generate considerable costs, mainly due to physician time costs, according to research published online July 28 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Patients Report Improved Care Access, Better Health With ACA

TUESDAY, July 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Millions more Americans have affordable health insurance, access to a personal doctor, and feel they are in better health following the first two open-enrollment periods of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a new analysis shows. The results are published in the July 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Delays Noted in the Reporting of Serious Patient Harms to FDA

MONDAY, July 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About 10 percent of cases where a drug does serious harm are not reported to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration within the required 15-day period, according to a new analysis published online July 27 as a research letter in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

CDC Revisits Marijuana-Linked Death in Colorado

FRIDAY, July 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. health officials on Thursday revisited the first reported marijuana-linked death in Colorado since voters there legalized recreational use of the drug in 2012.

Full Text

Expansion of High-Deductible Plans to Impact Physician Care

FRIDAY, July 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As a result of the increasing popularity of high-deductible health care plans, patients now have more financial responsibility for medical services, which is impacting physician practices, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

More Information

Adherence to Stroke Guidelines Overestimated by Hospitals

THURSDAY, July 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. hospitals overestimate their ability to provide fast delivery of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) to stroke patients, according to a study published online July 22 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Antibiotic May Reduce Anticoagulant Effect of Warfarin

WEDNESDAY, July 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The antibiotic dicloxacillin may lessen the effects of vitamin K antagonists, according to research published in the July 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Bystander CPR Tied to Boosts in Survival Rates

WEDNESDAY, July 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many lives could be saved if more people performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) immediately after seeing someone go into cardiac arrest, a new study contends. The report was published in the July 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy Unclear at Low Glycemic Range

WEDNESDAY, July 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The accuracy of blood glucose meters (BGMs) in the low glycemic range is questionable, according to an observation letter published online July 15 in Diabetes Care.

Full Text

Inadequate Adherence for Proper Removal of Protective Gear

TUESDAY, July 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many health care workers do not remove personal protective equipment (PPE) correctly, according to a brief report published in the July 1 issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

Abstract
Full Text

Antibiotic Misconceptions Still Common Among Parents

MONDAY, July 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many American parents still have misconceptions about when their children should receive antibiotics and what the medications do, a new study indicates. The findings were published online July 20 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial 1
Editorial 2

Clinical Signs of Citrin Deficiency Mimic Anorexia Nervosa

MONDAY, July 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The clinical features of citrin deficiency (CD) may mimic those of anorexia nervosa (AN), according to a case report published online July 20 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Macrolide-Resistant M. pneumoniae in All U.S. Regions

MONDAY, July 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MRMP) has a prevalence of 13.2 percent in a sample of M. pneumoniae-positive specimens from six locations in the United States, according to a study published in the August issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases.

Full Text

U.S. E. coli O157 Outbreaks Mainly Due to Food

FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Outbreaks of Shiga toxin-producing bacterium Escherichia coli O157 infection are mainly caused by food, especially beef and leafy vegetables, according to a study published in the August issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases.

Full Text

Clinicians May Harbor Biases About Sexual Orientation

FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Clinicians may be biased when it comes to the sexual orientation of patients, new research suggests. The study was published online July 16 in the American Journal of Public Health.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Wildfires Can Trigger Acute Coronary Events for Miles Around

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Wildfires create air pollution that fuels the risk for cardiovascular events, especially in older adults, researchers report in the July issue of the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Geographic Expansion of High-Risk Areas for Lyme Disease

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 1993 to 2012 there has been geographic expansion of high-risk areas for Lyme disease, according to a study published online July 15 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases.

Full Text

Failed Communication Associated With Readmission

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Failed communication attempts are associated with readmission among Medicare beneficiaries with congestive heart failure, although the correlation is no longer significant after adjustment for other variables, according to a study published online June 26 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Choosing Wisely: How to Implement in Clinical Practice

THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Strategies should be adopted to help with implementation of the Choosing Wisely program, which was designed to address the problem of medical overuse, according to an article published in the July/August issue of Family Practice Management.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Considerable Burden for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

WEDNESDAY, July 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The annual incidence of community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization is 24.8 cases per 10,000 adults, according to a study published online July 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Body Contact of Players Blamed for Most Soccer Concussions

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- While many experts have called for a ban on "heading" the ball in youth soccer because they believe it is a leading cause of concussions, a new study suggests the body contact that often occurs during such play is to blame for most brain injuries. The findings were published online July 13 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Caution: Increasing Trend of Foraging for Mushrooms

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Mistaking toxic mushrooms for edible ones is common and sometimes deadly, researchers warn in an article published online July 13 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Full Text

Second Severe Allergic Reaction Within Hours Isn't Uncommon

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About 15 percent of children who have a severe allergic reaction can have a second one within a few hours, according to a new study published online June 22 in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Alcohol Use Appears to Impair Driving More Than Cannabis Use

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking alcohol appears to negatively affect driving skills to a greater extent than smoking cannabis, according to research findings published online June 23 in Drug and Alcohol Dependence. And, combined use leads to greater behind-the-wheel impairment, but it doesn't double the effect.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Progress in Reporting Conflict of Interest Among IRB Members

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Among institutional review board (IRB) members, there has been positive progress in the reporting and management of conflicts of interest, according to a study published online July 13 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Arts Observation Curriculum May Be Beneficial for Medical Students

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of an arts observation curriculum can help students learn to observe objectively and articulate their observations, which are important traits for clinical practice, according to an article published online July 3 in Academic Medicine.

Full Text

Health Care Providers May Be Missing Signs of Child Abuse

MONDAY, July 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. hospitals are missing opportunities to detect physical abuse in infants and toddlers, according to research published online July 13 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Coronary Artery Disease Ups Risk of Bowel Bleeds With NSAIDs

MONDAY, July 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with coronary artery disease are at higher risk of small bowel bleeding (SBB) when taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), according to research published online July 6 in the Journal of Digestive Diseases.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Caution: Handle TCA With Care to Avoid Chemical Burns

FRIDAY, July 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Gynecologists should be aware that accidental exposure to trichloroacetic acid, which is used in routine procedures, may lead to serious chemical burns, according to a case report published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Herpes Simplex Virus Can Mimic Premature Rupture of Membranes

THURSDAY, July 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Unique presentation of herpes simplex virus infection in pregnancy can be misdiagnosed as premature rupture of membranes (PROM), according to a case report published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

WHO's Response to Ebola Slowed by Politics, Bureaucracy

WEDNESDAY, July 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Politics and bureaucracy slowed the World Health Organization's response to the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, according to a report from an independent, international panel.

Report of the Ebola Interim Assessment Panel

CDC: Heroin Use Up Among Women, Wealthier People

WEDNESDAY, July 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The face of heroin addiction in the United States is changing, as groups with historically lower rates of heroin use, including women and people with private insurance and higher incomes, are becoming users, federal officials reported Tuesday. The findings were published in the July 7 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Researchers ID Patients More Prone to Long-Term Opioid Use

TUESDAY, July 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with prior histories of drug abuse, or current or former smokers, are more likely to go beyond a short-term prescription for opioids, according to research published in the July issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Abstract
Full Text

Court Upholds Medical Liability Damages Cap

TUESDAY, July 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The non-economic damages cap under the Medical Injury Compensation Reform Act (MICRA) has been upheld again in a California court of appeal, according to a report published by the American Medical Association.

More Information

Despite Risk to Patients, Health Providers Often Work While Sick

MONDAY, July 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many health care professionals work when they are sick, putting their patients at risk for serious illness or even death, according to a study published online July 6 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

CDC: BBQ Grill Brush Wires Can Cause Serious GI Injury

MONDAY, July 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Wire bristles from grill brushes can snap off, land on the grate, and find their way into grilled meats, public health experts warn. If ingested, these bristles can perforate a person's throat and digestive tract, causing potentially life-threatening injuries.

More Information

Cherry Juice May Reduce Post-Exercise Respiratory Symptoms

MONDAY, July 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of Montmorency cherry juice (CJ) is associated with a reduction in the development of upper respiratory tract symptoms (URTS) after a marathon, according to a study published online May 11 in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition.

Full Text

Health Professionals May View Family-Witnessed CPR Negatively

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Jordanian health care professionals are against family-witnessed resuscitation in adult critical care settings, according to a study published online June 22 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Case Study: Vitamin K Deficiency Result of Vaccine Refusal

THURSDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fussy infants with unexplained bruising or bleeding may have late-onset vitamin K-deficient bleeding (VKDB) as a result of parental refusal of the vitamin K injection at birth, according to a case report published in the July issue of the Journal of Emergency Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs Offer Multiple Benefits

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMPs), frequently utilized by emergency medicine physicians and designed to help identify patients who "doctor shop" for prescriptions, are used to guide clinical decisions and opioid prescribing, as well as to facilitate discussions and provide patient education. The findings were published in the June issue of Pain Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Endurance Athletes Should Only Drink When Thirsty, Experts Say

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Athletes should listen to their body and drink water only when thirsty to prevent exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) or "water intoxication." The new guidelines were developed at the International Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia Consensus Development Conference in Carlsbad, Calif., and published in the July issue of the Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine.

Full Text

Regional Variation in Treatment of Ischemic Stroke

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There is considerable regional variation in thrombolysis treatment for ischemic stroke, according to a study published online June 2 in Stroke.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

IOM: Make CPR Mandatory High School Requirement

WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Far too few Americans are surviving cardiac arrest, and a new report issued Tuesday by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) offers strategies to boost survival rates.

More Information

Residents' Knowledge of High-Value Care Varies

WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. internal medicine (IM) residents report varying knowledge and practice of high-value care (HVC), according to research published online June 16 in Academic Medicine.

Full Text

Public Opinion Sought on New Licensure for Assistant Physicians

WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New classification of licensure for assistant physicians has been created, and public opinion is being sought by the Missouri State Board of Registration for the Healing Arts prior to filing these rules with the Secretary of State's Office and the Joint Committee on Administrative Rules.

More Information

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »


Sign up for myCME e-newsletters


Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease


More in Home

Dermatography Helps Lessen Appearance of Surgical Scars

Dermatography Helps Lessen Appearance of Surgical Scars

Pigments can restore more natural skin appearance that patients are happy with

Drug-Resistant Bacteria Live in America's Water Systems

Drug-Resistant Bacteria Live in America's Water Systems

Bacteria found in plumbing may sicken thousands each year

Deep Brain Stimulation May Improve TBI Symptoms

Deep Brain Stimulation May Improve TBI Symptoms

Deep brain stimulation appears to boost function and quality of life

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »