January 2017 Briefing - Pediatrics

This article originally appeared here.
Share this content:

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for January 2017. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

MRI May Help ID Suicide Risk in Young Bipolar Patients

TUESDAY, Jan. 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Among adolescents and young adults with bipolar disorder, those who attempt suicide show reduced volume and activity in areas of the brain that regulate emotion and impulses, according to a study published online Jan. 31 in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cardiovascular Event Risks May Be Affected by Timing of Meals

TUESDAY, Jan. 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new statement from the American Heart Association (AHA), published online Jan. 30 in Circulation, highlights what's known -- and what's not -- about meal timing and cardiovascular health.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Guidelines Developed for Use of Growth Hormone in Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Use of growth hormone (GH) in children and adolescents should be considered carefully, with assessment of the risks and benefits necessary for each patient, according to guidelines published in the January issue of Hormone Research in Paediatrics.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Azithromycin Given in Labor Cuts Maternal, Neonatal Infections

TUESDAY, Jan. 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Administration of azithromycin during labor is associated with a reduction in maternal and neonatal clinical infections, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in Pediatrics.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Musculoskeletal Low Back Pain Common in School-Aged Children

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Low back pain is common in school-age American children, and rates increase with age, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Chronic Bullying Has Detrimental Effect on Academic Performance

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic bullying can have a negative impact on children's grades, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in the Journal of Educational Psychology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Mediterranean Diet May Help Lower ADHD Risk

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Children who follow a Mediterranean diet may be less likely to have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online Jan. 30 in Pediatrics.

Full Text

Father Involvement Lacking in Pediatric Obesity Programs

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Fathers are not adequately engaged in pediatric obesity treatment or prevention programs with parent involvement, according to a review published online Jan. 27 in Pediatrics.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

NATA Issues Clinical Guidance on Acute Skin Trauma in Sports

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Clinical decisions and intervention protocols after acute skin trauma during participation in athletic and recreational activities vary among athletic trainers and are often based on ritualistic practices, according to a National Athletic Trainers' Association position statement published in the December issue of the Journal of Athletic Training.

Full Text

Microbiota Transfer Therapy Could Help Children With Autism

FRIDAY, Jan. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new approach to alter the gut microbiome and virome may be an effective treatment for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to research published online Jan. 23 in Microbiome.

Full Text

U.S. Children Make Over 6 Million Office Visits/Year for ADHD

FRIDAY, Jan. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An average 6.1 million physician visits in 2012 to 2013 were made by children aged 4 to 17 with a primary diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a January data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

More Information

Ketone Monitoring Infrequent in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

FRIDAY, Jan. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), self-reported ketone monitoring is infrequent overall, according to research published online Jan. 18 in Diabetes Care.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Aromatase Inhibitor + Growth Hormone Can Optimize Height

FRIDAY, Jan. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Use of an aromatase inhibitor in combination with growth hormone seems effective for optimizing height in 11β-hydroxylase-deficient congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), according to a case report published online Jan. 26 in Pediatrics.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Most U.S. Children Consume at Least One Sugary Drink a Day

THURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly two-thirds of boys and girls ages 2 to 19 in the United States drink at least one sugar-sweetened beverage daily, according to a January data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

Data Brief 1
Data Brief 2

28% of Adults, 9% of Teens Use Tobacco Products in U.S.

THURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the dangers, many American adults and teens still use tobacco products, according to a report published in the Jan. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Most PCPs Oppose Complete Repeal of the Affordable Care Act

THURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of primary care doctors oppose full repeal of the Affordable Care Act, according to a perspective piece published online Jan. 25 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text

Universal CAR T-Cell Therapy Helped Treat ALL in Two Infants

THURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Two infants with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are in remission after treatment with genetically modified immune system cells, according to a report on the two cases published in the Jan. 25 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

Full Text

Strategies Presented for Addressing Uncompensated Time

THURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Strategies can be employed to help physicians deal with the increasing burden of uncompensated tasks, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

More Information

Continuous Glucose Monitoring Ups Control in T1DM Patients

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A continuous glucose monitor (CGM) helps patients with type 1 diabetes better manage their blood glucose levels, according to two studies published in the Jan. 24/31 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Full Text 1 (subscription or payment may be required)
Full Text 2 (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Report Urges Pediatric Practices to Consider Consent by Proxy

MONDAY, Jan. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Issues relating to consent by proxy for non-urgent pediatric care should be considered, according to a report published online Jan. 23 in Pediatrics.

Full Text

Psoriasis Impacts QoL for Parents of Affected Children

MONDAY, Jan. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood psoriasis impacts parents' quality of life in multiple domains, especially their emotional well-being, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

QI Initiative Cuts Health Care Use in Children With Epilepsy

MONDAY, Jan. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A quality improvement (QI) initiative can reduce emergency department and health care utilization for children with epilepsy, according to a report published online Jan. 20 in Pediatrics.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Nadir Platelet Counts Tied to AKI in Pediatric Open-Heart Surgery

MONDAY, Jan. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For pediatric patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), postoperative nadir platelet counts are associated with the severity of acute kidney injury (AKI), according to a review published online Jan. 18 in Pediatric Anesthesia.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Obesity Underrepresented in Medical Licensing Exams

FRIDAY, Jan. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The most important concepts of obesity prevention and treatment are not adequately represented on the U.S. Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step examinations, according to a study published recently in Teaching and Learning in Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hydrolyzed Cow's Milk Formula May Up Islet Autoimmunity

FRIDAY, Jan. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Use of hydrolyzed cow's milk-based formula introduced during the first seven days is associated with increased risk of islet autoimmunity in infants at increased risk of type 1 diabetes (T1D), according to a study published online Jan. 17 in Diabetes Care.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome Described in 9-Year-Old Girl

FRIDAY, Jan. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- In a case report published online Jan. 19 in Pediatrics, iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome (CS) is described in a 9-year-old girl who received topical ocular glucocorticoid (GC) treatment for bilateral iridocyclitis.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Increased Risk of Obesity for Children With Asthma

FRIDAY, Jan. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of developing obesity during childhood and adolescence is increased for children with asthma, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

MRI Helpful in Identifying White Matter Injury in Preemies

THURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shortly after birth might help determine which premature babies have sustained a brain injury that will affect their development, according to a study published online Jan. 18 in Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA, EPA Issue Guidance on Fish Consumption

THURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new U.S. government guideline classifies fish into three categories of safety to help pregnant women, breastfeeding mothers, and parents of young children make healthy choices.

More Information

Effectiveness of One-Dose MenACWY-D Drops Over Time

THURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For adolescents, the effectiveness of the one-dose meningococcal (groups A, C, W, and Y) polysaccharide diphtheria toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-D) decreases at three to less than eight years post-vaccination, according to a study published online Jan. 18 in Pediatrics.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Oxytocin Ups Feeding, Social Skills in Infants With Prader-Willi

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For infants with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), oxytocin (OXT) administration is associated with improvement in feeding and social skills, according to a study published online Jan. 18 in Pediatrics.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Delayed Clamping Reduces Anemia at 8, 12 Months of Age

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For infants at high risk of iron deficiency anemia, delayed umbilical cord clamping reduces anemia at 8 and 12 months of age, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Full Text

Breastfeeding Mothers Prefer to Supplement Their Own Vitamin D

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Breastfeeding mothers prefer supplementing themselves with vitamin D rather than supplementing their infants, according to research published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Full Text

Neurodevelopment at Age 2 Not Worse After ART Conception

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive, motor, and language development at age 2 years is similar for children born after assisted reproductive technologies (ART) conception and natural conception, according to a study published in the February issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Current Guidelines for Pediatric Tonsillectomies Questioned

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers evaluating evidence for tonsillectomy found that more children would receive significant short-term improvement in their daily life if the current guidelines were relaxed. The two reviews were published online Jan. 17 in Pediatrics.

Full Text 1 (subscription or payment may be required)
Full Text 2 (subscription or payment may be required)

Acupuncture Reduces Crying in Infants With Colic

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture may be an effective treatment option for infantile colic, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in Acupuncture in Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Tied to Poor School Performance

MONDAY, Jan. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Children with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) may be more likely to perform poorly in school, according to a new study published online Jan. 16 in Pediatrics.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Risk of Post-Op Infections Up in Overweight, Obese Children

MONDAY, Jan. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight and obese children seem to be more likely than others to develop postoperative surgical site infections, according to a study published recently in Surgical Infections.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Sunflower Seed Oil, Baby Lotion Don't Harm Skin Barrier Function

MONDAY, Jan. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Neither sunflower seed oil (SSO) nor baby lotion (L) harms skin barrier function adaptation in healthy full-term neonates, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Artificial Sweetener Use Up in U.S. Children in Recent Years

FRIDAY, Jan. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of foods and beverages with low-calorie sweeteners (LCS) such as aspartame, sucralose, and saccharin rose 200 percent among children between 1999 and 2012, while their use rose 54 percent among adults, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Guidance Provided for Introduction of Foods to Infants

FRIDAY, Jan. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- In a position paper published in the January issue of the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, guidance is presented in relation to complementary foods and their introduction into an infant's diet.

Full Text

Pace of Influenza Activity Picking Up Across the United States

FRIDAY, Jan. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The pace of flu activity continues to quicken across the United States, and probably hasn't peaked yet, according to an assessment by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More Information

Effect of Providing Price Info Varies for Type of Clinician

FRIDAY, Jan. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The effect of price information varies for pediatric- and adult-focused clinicians, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in Pediatrics.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Tobacco Counseling for Youth, Adults Cuts Smoking Prevalence

FRIDAY, Jan. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Tobacco counseling for youth or adults can reduce the prevalence of smoking cigarettes during adult years, according to a study published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Full Text

Quality Improvement Initiative Cuts Milk Administration Errors

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A quality improvement initiative can reduce the number of human milk administration errors in the neonatal intensive care unit, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in Pediatrics.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Yoga Intervention Feasible for Improving QoL in Pediatric Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A pilot yoga intervention is feasible for improving pediatric cancer patients' and parents' quality of life, according to research published in the January issue of Rehabilitation Oncology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Families Find High Health Care Deductibles Burdensome

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- High-deductible health plans have multiplied in recent years, and they may pose a significant financial burden on Americans with chronic conditions, according to two studies published online Jan. 9 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Full Text 1 (subscription or payment may be required)
Full Text 2 (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Excessive FDA Regulation Driving High Drug Prices

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The excessive regulatory regime at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is an important driver of high drug prices, and should be curbed to introduce more competition and lower prices, according to a report published online Jan. 5 by the National Center for Policy Analysis.

Full Text

Novel Diet Can Help Children With Crohn's, Colitis Find Relief

TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Children with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis may be able to achieve relief without medications by eating a special diet, according to a study published recently in the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Care Can Be Compromised When Parents Offend Pediatric Staff

TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Rude parents can rattle medical staff enough to compromise the quality of care their critically ill child receives, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in Pediatrics.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

USPSTF Reaffirms Endorsement of Prenatal Folic Acid Supplements

TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- In a recommendation statement published in the Jan. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) reaffirms that folic acid supplements reduce the risk of neural tube defects.

Recommendation Statement
Evidence Review
Editorial 1
Editorial 2

Acid Suppression in Pregnancy Linked to Childhood Asthma

TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Women who take acid-suppressing medications during pregnancy may have a child at increased risk of developing asthma, according to a review published online Jan. 9 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physical Activity Predicts Depression in Middle Childhood

TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Higher moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) at age 6 and 8 years predicts fewer symptoms of major depression two years later, according to a study published online Jan. 9 in Pediatrics.

Full Text

Intense Aerobic Exercise Can Cut Behavioral Issues in School

MONDAY, Jan. 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Children with behavioral disorders might fare better at school if they get some exercise during the day, according to a study published online Jan. 9 in Pediatrics.

Full Text

Very Obese Teens Benefit From Gastric Bypass Over Long Term

FRIDAY, Jan. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Weight-loss surgery helps severely obese teens maintain weight loss over the long term; however, some young people may need additional surgery to manage complications associated with their rapid post-surgery weight loss, and some may also develop nutritional deficiencies, according to two studies published online Jan. 5 in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

Full Text 1 (subscription or payment may be required)
Full Text 2 (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Guidelines Urge Earlier Peanut Intro for High-Risk Infants

THURSDAY, Jan. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Infants at increased risk for peanut allergy should have peanut-containing foods added to their diets as early as 4 months of age, according to new U.S. clinical guidelines published in the January issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Full Text

Vitamin D Insufficiency in Infancy Not Linked to Food Allergy

THURSDAY, Jan. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D insufficiency (VDI) at birth or age 6 months is not associated with food allergy at 1 year, according to a study published online Jan. 2 in Allergy.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Retailers Often Recommend Age-Restricted Supplements to Teens

TUESDAY, Jan. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Health food store employees frequently recommend creatine and testosterone boosters to under-age, male high school athletes, according to a study published online Jan. 2 in Pediatrics.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Maternal, Paternal Obesity Tied to Childhood Development Delays

TUESDAY, Jan. 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal and paternal obesity are associated with delays in early childhood development, according to a study published online Jan. 2 in Pediatrics.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pelvic Physical Therapy Effective for Functional Constipation

TUESDAY, Jan. 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For children with functional constipation (FC), pelvic physical therapy (PPT) is more effective than standard medical care (SMC) for almost all outcomes measured, according to a study published in the January issue of Gastroenterology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »


Sign up for myCME e-newsletters


Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

ASA: Male Stroke Patients Twice As Likely to Get Timely tPA

ASA: Male Stroke Patients Twice As Likely to ...

Researchers not sure why the disparity exists

CDC: Fatal Drug Overdoses More Than Doubled Since 1999

CDC: Fatal Drug Overdoses More Than Doubled Since ...

Whites, middle-aged adults hardest hit, researchers find

Rates of Resistant Infections Up in U.S. Children

Rates of Resistant Infections Up in U.S. Children

Research highlights increasing community vulnerability

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »