January 2016 Briefing - Urology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Urology for January 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Demand for Medical Office Space High and Increasing

FRIDAY, Jan. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Demand for medical office space for ambulatory care is at a high point and looks likely to continue increasing, according to an article published in Forbes.

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AMA Highlights Top Four Issues to Promote in State Legislation

THURSDAY, Jan. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The top four issues that will be promoted in state legislation in 2016 were discussed at the 2016 American Medical Association (AMA) State Legislative Strategy Conference, according to a report published by the AMA.

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~1% of Physicians Account for One-Third of Malpractice Claims

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A small number of physicians account for a considerable proportion of all paid malpractice claims, according to a study published in the Jan. 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Alternative Payment Models Can Help Improve Patient Care

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Alternative payment models (APMs) have been and are being developed that can allow physicians to offer new and improved services to their patients, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Possibility for Health Care Legislation Changes in 2016

TUESDAY, Jan. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Given the current political climate and issues of bipartisan concern, 2016 could see certain changes to health care legislation, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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ACP Presents High-Value Care Advice for Hematuria

TUESDAY, Jan. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a clinical guideline published online Jan. 26 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, recommendations relating to evaluation of hematuria are presented for clinicians.

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Better Value Care at Hospitals With Best Nursing Environments

MONDAY, Jan. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals with better nursing environments provide better value care, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in JAMA Surgery.

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Patient Satisfaction With Doctors May Be on the Rise

FRIDAY, Jan. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More Americans than ever are satisfied with their visits to the doctor, according to a new survey conducted by The Harris Poll in September.

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About 2 Percent of Boys Have Undescended Testis

FRIDAY, Jan. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- About 2 percent of boys are diagnosed with undescended testis (UDT), according to a study published online Jan. 22 in Pediatrics.

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Cystectomy Plus Chemo Ups Survival in Bladder Cancer

THURSDAY, Jan. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with locally advanced bladder cancer, cystectomy plus adjuvant chemotherapy is associated with improved survival versus cystectomy alone, according to a study published online Jan. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Shorter Surgery, Lower Costs for One-Layer Vasovasostomy

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For men undergoing bilateral vasovasostomy, a modified one-layer technique results in shorter operative times and lower costs compared with formal repair, according to research published in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Physicians Choose Less Aggressive Care at End of Life

TUESDAY, Jan. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians facing death are less likely to demand aggressive care, according to two research letters published in the Jan. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on death, dying, and end of life.

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Greater Transparency Being Promoted in Research

MONDAY, Jan. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Greater transparency is being promoted in clinical research, according to a health policy brief published online Jan. 14 in Health Affairs.

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Design of Physician Satisfaction Surveys Affects Results

MONDAY, Jan. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patient satisfaction scores are influenced by the design and implementation of patient surveys, according to an article published in the January-February issue of Family Practice Management.

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Flavonoid-Rich Diet Tied to Lower Erectile Dysfunction Risk

FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Foods rich in flavonoids are associated with reduced risk of erectile dysfunction, according to research published online Jan. 13 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Incidence of Nephrolithiasis Rising in Teens, Blacks

FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A growing number of teens, women, and blacks are being diagnosed with nephrolithiasis, according to findings published online Jan. 14 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Diagnostic Imaging Down With High Deductible Health Plans

FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. patients whose health insurance plans have high deductibles undergo fewer diagnostic imaging tests, according to a study published in the February issue of Medical Care.

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Mosquito Mesh an Option for Hernia Repair in Poor Countries

THURSDAY, Jan. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Groin hernia repair with mosquito netting may be a viable alternative in countries where commercial mesh is too expensive, according to research published in the Jan. 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Female Urologists Less Compensated Than Males

FRIDAY, Jan. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- After adjustment for multiple factors, female urologists are significantly less compensated than males, according to a study published in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

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U.S. Cancer Mortality Rates Down 23 Percent Since 1991

THURSDAY, Jan. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Since peaking in 1991, cancer mortality rates in the United States have dropped by 23 percent, according to findings included in Cancer Statistics, 2016, the American Cancer Society's latest annual report on cancer incidence, mortality, and survival. The report was published online Jan. 7 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

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African-American Men Produce Less Prostate-Specific Antigen

THURSDAY, Jan. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Among men with Gleason score 3+3=6 prostate cancer, African-Americans produce less prostate-specific antigen than Caucasians, according to a study published in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Many Patients Using E-Mail As First Method of Provider Contact

TUESDAY, Jan. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic conditions, the ability to communicate with their doctor via e-mail may help improve their health, according to a study published online Dec. 21 in the American Journal of Managed Care.

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FDA Tightens Rules for Using Mesh Implants in Prolapse Repair

TUESDAY, Jan. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has strengthened rules regarding the use of vaginal mesh implants to treat pelvic organ prolapse in women, according to a news release issued by the agency.

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Diagnostic Factors May Help Patients Avoid Prostate Biopsy

MONDAY, Jan. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Initial diagnostic characteristics may be able to identify men initiating active surveillance who could avoid confirmatory biopsy, according to a study published in the January issue of The Journal of Urology.

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