January 2016 Briefing - Pain Management

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pain Management for January 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Demand for Medical Office Space High and Increasing

FRIDAY, Jan. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Demand for medical office space for ambulatory care is at a high point and looks likely to continue increasing, according to an article published in Forbes.

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AMA Highlights Top Four Issues to Promote in State Legislation

THURSDAY, Jan. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The top four issues that will be promoted in state legislation in 2016 were discussed at the 2016 American Medical Association (AMA) State Legislative Strategy Conference, according to a report published by the AMA.

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~1% of Physicians Account for One-Third of Malpractice Claims

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A small number of physicians account for a considerable proportion of all paid malpractice claims, according to a study published in the Jan. 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Alternative Payment Models Can Help Improve Patient Care

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Alternative payment models (APMs) have been and are being developed that can allow physicians to offer new and improved services to their patients, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Possibility for Health Care Legislation Changes in 2016

TUESDAY, Jan. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Given the current political climate and issues of bipartisan concern, 2016 could see certain changes to health care legislation, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Prednisolone Therapy Induces Procoagulant State

TUESDAY, Jan. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For healthy subjects, 10 days of prednisolone therapy induces a procoagulant state, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Patient Satisfaction With Doctors May Be on the Rise

FRIDAY, Jan. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More Americans than ever are satisfied with their visits to the doctor, according to a new survey conducted by The Harris Poll in September.

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Eluxadoline Eases Pain and Diarrhea for Some With IBS

THURSDAY, Jan. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Eluxadoline (Viberzi) for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea seems to reduce symptoms for some patients for at least six months, according to research published in the Jan. 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Based on these findings, eluxadoline was approved recently by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Physicians Choose Less Aggressive Care at End of Life

TUESDAY, Jan. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians facing death are less likely to demand aggressive care, according to two research letters published in the Jan. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on death, dying, and end of life.

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Greater Transparency Being Promoted in Research

MONDAY, Jan. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Greater transparency is being promoted in clinical research, according to a health policy brief published online Jan. 14 in Health Affairs.

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Medical Marijuana May Help Treat, Prevent Migraines

MONDAY, Jan. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Marijuana may give relief to migraine sufferers, according to research published online Jan. 9 in Pharmacotherapy.

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Design of Physician Satisfaction Surveys Affects Results

MONDAY, Jan. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patient satisfaction scores are influenced by the design and implementation of patient surveys, according to an article published in the January-February issue of Family Practice Management.

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Diagnostic Imaging Down With High Deductible Health Plans

FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. patients whose health insurance plans have high deductibles undergo fewer diagnostic imaging tests, according to a study published in the February issue of Medical Care.

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Pathway to Heroin Described in NEJM Commentary

THURSDAY, Jan. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. researchers are challenging a leading theory about the nation's heroin epidemic, saying it's not a direct result of the crackdown on opioids. The commentary has been published in the Jan. 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Newborn Abstinence Sx Up, Tied to Increasing Prenatal Opioid Use

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Between 2000 and 2009, the incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome among newborns rose from 1.2 to 3.4 per 1,000 live births, Nora Volkow, M.D., director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, reported in an editorial published online Jan. 12 in The BMJ.

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Patient, Doctor Panels Develop Similar RA Recommendations

MONDAY, Jan. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A voting panel composed of patients with rheumatoid arthritis develops recommendations that are very similar to those of a physician-dominated panel when there is evidence warranting moderate or high confidence, according to research published in the January issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Motor Control Exercise Can Help Ease Lower Back Pain

FRIDAY, Jan. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Motor control exercise to improve coordination of muscles that support the spine can help reduce lower back pain, according to research published online Jan. 7 in The Cochrane Library.

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Positive Effects of Psychological Treatments Maintained in IBS

THURSDAY, Jan. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Psychological therapies such as relaxation and hypnosis can offer long-term benefits for patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to a study published online Dec. 22 in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Many Patients Using E-Mail As First Method of Provider Contact

TUESDAY, Jan. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic conditions, the ability to communicate with their doctor via e-mail may help improve their health, according to a study published online Dec. 21 in the American Journal of Managed Care.

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Opioid Exposure Tied to Higher Odds of Low Testosterone Levels

MONDAY, Jan. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to opioids is associated with increased likelihood of low testosterone levels, with increased odds as age and number of comorbidities increase, according to a study published in the December issue of Pain Medicine.

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