January 2016 Briefing - Cardiology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for January 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Demand for Medical Office Space High and Increasing

FRIDAY, Jan. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Demand for medical office space for ambulatory care is at a high point and looks likely to continue increasing, according to an article published in Forbes.

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Ezetimibe/Simvastatin Ups Clinical Outcomes in IMPROVE-IT

FRIDAY, Jan. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Lipid-lowering therapy with ezetimibe plus simvastatin is associated with improved clinical outcomes, with a reduction in total primary end point (PEP) events, according to a study published in the Feb. 2 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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AMA Highlights Top Four Issues to Promote in State Legislation

THURSDAY, Jan. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The top four issues that will be promoted in state legislation in 2016 were discussed at the 2016 American Medical Association (AMA) State Legislative Strategy Conference, according to a report published by the AMA.

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Carbamazepine Affects Warfarin Anticoagulation

THURSDAY, Jan. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For warfarin-treated patients, carbamazepine co-treatment is associated with subtherapeutic anticoagulative effect and increased warfarin dose requirements, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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n-3 PUFA Tx After AMI Linked to Drop in Death, Recurrent AMI

THURSDAY, Jan. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), the use of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is associated with reduced risk of all-cause mortality and recurrent AMI through 12-month follow-up, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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No Beneficial Effects Seen for Cyclosporine A in Reperfused MI

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A single intravenous cyclosporine A (CsA) bolus just before primary percutaneous coronary intervention has no beneficial effects on ST-segment resolution in reperfused myocardial infarction (MI), according to a study published in the Feb. 2 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Alternative Payment Models Can Help Improve Patient Care

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Alternative payment models (APMs) have been and are being developed that can allow physicians to offer new and improved services to their patients, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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~1% of Physicians Account for One-Third of Malpractice Claims

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A small number of physicians account for a considerable proportion of all paid malpractice claims, according to a study published in the Jan. 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Review: Dabigatran Comparable to Warfarin for Nonvalvular A-Fib

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, dabigatran 150 mg is comparable to warfarin for preventing ischemic stroke, and correlates with lower risk of intracranial bleeding but higher risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, according to a review published online Jan. 26 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Low-Dose Chlorthalidone Beats HCTZ for Ambulatory BP Control

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with stage 1 hypertension, low-dose chlorthalidone is associated with reduction in ambulatory blood pressure (ABP), while low-dose hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) may result in masked hypertension, according to a study published in the Feb. 2 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Possibility for Health Care Legislation Changes in 2016

TUESDAY, Jan. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Given the current political climate and issues of bipartisan concern, 2016 could see certain changes to health care legislation, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Pulse Pressure Linked to Multiple Adverse Cardiovascular Outcomes

TUESDAY, Jan. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pulse pressure (PP) is associated with multiple adverse cardiovascular outcomes, according to a study published in the Feb. 2 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Prednisolone Therapy Induces Procoagulant State

TUESDAY, Jan. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For healthy subjects, 10 days of prednisolone therapy induces a procoagulant state, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Overweight, Obesity Linked to Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death

TUESDAY, Jan. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight and obese individuals are at increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and non-SCD, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Better Value Care at Hospitals With Best Nursing Environments

MONDAY, Jan. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals with better nursing environments provide better value care, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in JAMA Surgery.

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Coronary CT Angiography Findings Modify Statin, Aspirin Rx

MONDAY, Jan. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Knowledge of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) results is associated with improved alignment of aspirin and statin prescribing with the presence and severity of coronary artery disease (CAD), according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Hypoglycemia, Atherosclerosis Progression Link Explored

MONDAY, Jan. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial, hypoglycemia was associated with coronary artery calcium (CAC) progression only in the standard therapy group (versus intensive therapy), according to research published online Jan. 19 in Diabetes Care.

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Guidelines for Appropriate Use of Cardiac Imaging in the ER

MONDAY, Jan. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New guidelines, published online Jan. 22 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, have been developed for assessing the appropriateness of imaging for patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain.

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IV Thrombolysis Aids Patients Dependent Before Their Stroke

FRIDAY, Jan. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) treatment might benefit stroke patients who needed help with daily living before their stroke, according to research published online Jan. 21 in Stroke.

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Patient Satisfaction With Doctors May Be on the Rise

FRIDAY, Jan. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More Americans than ever are satisfied with their visits to the doctor, according to a new survey conducted by The Harris Poll in September.

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Glucose Levels Linked to Cardiac Surgery Outcomes

FRIDAY, Jan. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing cardiac surgery, hyperglycemia is associated with worse outcomes for patients without diabetes, but with better outcomes for patients with insulin-treated diabetes, according to a study published online Jan. 19 in Diabetes Care.

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Focused Cardiac Ultrasonography Can Discriminate LVSF

FRIDAY, Jan. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Focused cardiac ultrasonographic (FoCUS) examination can be used by trained internal medicine physicians to discriminate normal from reduced left ventricular systolic function (LVSF), according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of Clinical Ultrasound.

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Review Shows Lasting Weight Loss for Very-Low-Energy Diets

THURSDAY, Jan. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Very-low-energy diets (VLEDs) seem to be beneficial for long-term weight loss, according to a review published online Jan. 18 in Obesity Reviews.

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Depressive Symptoms Linked to Coronary Artery Calcium

THURSDAY, Jan. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Depressive symptoms seem to be associated with coronary artery calcium (CAC) in older men and women, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Profound Hypothermia Best Avoided in Initial Reperfusion

THURSDAY, Jan. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For hearts donated after circulatory death (DCD), avoidance of profound hypothermia during initial reperfusion (IR) improves functional recovery, according to a study published online Jan. 18 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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A-Fib May Pose Bigger Threat to Women

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Atrial fibrillation is a stronger risk factor for stroke, cardiac events, heart failure, and death in women than it is in men, according to an analysis published online Jan. 19 in The BMJ.

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Guidelines Provided for Correct Way to Dismiss Patients

TUESDAY, Jan. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- As insurers place increasing emphasis on evaluating physicians based on quality measures, management of noncompliant patients is becoming more complex, and can lead to patient dismissal, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Physicians Choose Less Aggressive Care at End of Life

TUESDAY, Jan. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians facing death are less likely to demand aggressive care, according to two research letters published in the Jan. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on death, dying, and end of life.

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Impact of T2DM Meds on Heart Failure Hospitalization Explored

TUESDAY, Jan. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, there is no association between hospitalization for heart failure and treatment with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4is) versus sulfonylureas (SUs) or treatment with saxagliptin versus sitagliptin, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in Diabetes Care.

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Greater Transparency Being Promoted in Research

MONDAY, Jan. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Greater transparency is being promoted in clinical research, according to a health policy brief published online Jan. 14 in Health Affairs.

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Design of Physician Satisfaction Surveys Affects Results

MONDAY, Jan. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patient satisfaction scores are influenced by the design and implementation of patient surveys, according to an article published in the January-February issue of Family Practice Management.

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Stethoscope Still Valuable Despite Technological Advances

MONDAY, Jan. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Despite advances in medical technology, the stethoscope still has important diagnostic value, according to an editorial published online Jan. 15 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Nonverbal Cues May Reveal a Physician's Racial Bias

FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A physician's body language may reveal racial bias against seriously ill black patients, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management.

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Electronic Cigarettes May Hinder Smoking Cessation Efforts

FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- E-cigarette use actually lowers smokers' chances that they'll quit tobacco by about 28 percent, according to an evidence review published online Jan. 14 in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine.

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Diagnostic Imaging Down With High Deductible Health Plans

FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. patients whose health insurance plans have high deductibles undergo fewer diagnostic imaging tests, according to a study published in the February issue of Medical Care.

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Diabetes Mellitus Is Independent Risk Factor for A-Fib

FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Within a general population from China, diabetes mellitus (DM) is an independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation (AF), with the correlation persisting after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation.

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Tissue May Beat Metal for AVR in Middle-Aged Patients

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged aortic valve replacement patients may have better outcomes if they receive bioprosthetic valves rather than mechanical, according to research published online Jan. 12 in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

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Acute Ozone Exposure Ups Stress Hormone in Humans

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Acute ozone exposure increases stress hormones and causes alterations in peripheral lipid metabolism in humans, according to research published online Jan. 8 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Statins May Aid CABG Recovery

TUESDAY, Jan. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who take statins before and after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) have fewer complications and a reduced mortality risk during and soon after the operation, according to a new report published online Jan. 12 in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

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Even Small Decline in Kidney Function Tied to CVD Risk

TUESDAY, Jan. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Even a slight decline in kidney function can potentially lead to heart damage, according to research published online Jan. 11 in Hypertension.

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Sugary Drinks Linked to Increase in Visceral Adipose Tissue

TUESDAY, Jan. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Regular consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with greater accumulation of visceral adipose tissue, according to research published online Jan. 11 in Circulation.

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Azithromycin Prescribed Despite Risk for QTc Prolongation

TUESDAY, Jan. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Azithromycin is frequently prescribed to hospitalized patients despite the presence of risk factors for QTc prolongation, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Review: Paroxetine Use in Pregnancy Tied to Malformations

TUESDAY, Jan. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Gestational exposure to paroxetine in the first trimester is associated with increased risk of major congenital malformations and major cardiac malformations, according to a review published online Nov. 27 in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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PF4/Heparin Antibodies Predict Mortality in HIT

MONDAY, Jan. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is infrequent in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, but is associated with increased 30-day mortality, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Extended-Release Niacin Lowers ApoB-48 Concentration in T2DM

FRIDAY, Jan. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, a statin plus extended-release niacin (ERN) lowers apolipoprotein B-48 (apoB-48) concentration compared to a statin alone, according to a study published online Dec. 18 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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Cardiomyopathy Etiology Impacts Catheter Ablation Outcomes

FRIDAY, Jan. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and left ventricular systolic dysfunction, cardiomyopathy etiology impacts long term outcomes of catheter ablation, according to a study published online Dec. 28 in the Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology.

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Truncating Variant Prevalence Up in Peripartum Cardiomyopathy

FRIDAY, Jan. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women with peripartum cardiomyopathy have a prevalence of truncating variants similar to that seen in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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New Guidelines Say Limit Added Sugars to <10 Percent of Calories

FRIDAY, Jan. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans offers five overarching guidelines that encourage healthy eating patterns, rather than focusing on individual dietary components such as food groups and nutrients as in previous editions.

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CDC: Americans Still Consume Too Much Salt

FRIDAY, Jan. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More than 90 percent of children and 89 percent of adults consume more sodium than is recommended in the new 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, according to research published in the Jan. 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Candidacy Criteria Updated for Heart Transplantation

THURSDAY, Jan. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The 2006 listing criteria for heart transplantation have been updated and expanded. The new guideline was published online Jan. 7 in the Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation.

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LARC Deemed Safe for Women With Cardiovascular Conditions

THURSDAY, Jan. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For women with cardiovascular conditions, long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) appears safe with few complications, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Considerable Subclinical Cardiac Disease in Childhood CA Survivors

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adult survivors of childhood cancer are at increased risk for subclinical cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Jan. 5 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Statins May Reduce CVD Risks Linked to Sleep Apnea

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new discovery about the way obstructive sleep apnea may raise the risk of cardiovascular disease also suggests that taking statins might reduce that risk. The findings were published in the Jan. 6 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Review: Interventions Can Cut Inappropriate Cardiac Imaging

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Quality improvement interventions that employ physician audit and feedback can reduce inappropriate cardiac imaging, according to a review published online Jan. 5 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Role of Pathogenic Variants in Arrhythmia Genes Unclear

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Potentially pathogenic genetic variants in arrhythmia susceptibility genes are not associated with an abnormal phenotype, according to a study published in the Jan. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Many Patients Using E-Mail As First Method of Provider Contact

TUESDAY, Jan. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic conditions, the ability to communicate with their doctor via e-mail may help improve their health, according to a study published online Dec. 21 in the American Journal of Managed Care.

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Hawaii Becomes First State to Raise Smoking Age to 21

MONDAY, Jan. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Hawaii has become the first state to raise the legal smoking age to 21 for both traditional and electronic cigarettes. State health officials hope the new law, effective Jan. 1, will make it harder for teenagers to try smoking or to develop the deadly habit, the Associated Press reported.

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Angiotensin Receptor Blockers, ACEIs Deemed Equally Effective

MONDAY, Jan. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are just as effective and safe as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), according to research published in the January issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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CDC: Heart Failure Mortality Up 2012 Through 2014

MONDAY, Jan. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The age-adjusted mortality rates from heart failure decreased from 2000 to 2012 but increased from 2012 through 2014, according to a December data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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Tx Delay Impacts Microvascular Reperfusion in STEMI

MONDAY, Jan. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), delayed reperfusion therapy is associated with greater microcirculation injury, according to a study published in the Dec. 28 issue of JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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