January 2015 Briefing - Psychiatry

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for January 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Liberals, Independents Found to Have Greater Longevity

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to people with conservative and moderate political ideologies, liberals were found less likely to die over the course of a 30-year review. But party lines did not determine life span, with Independents faring better than Republicans and Democrats, according to the research published online Jan. 28 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

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CDC: ~8 Percent of U.S. Adults Nonadherent Due to Rx Costs

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in 10 American adults don't take their medications as prescribed because they can't afford to, according to a January data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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Cost of Meds Contributes to Placebo Effect in Parkinson's

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Results of a small study suggest that Parkinson's patients seem to improve if they think they're taking a costly medication. The findings have been published online Jan. 28 in Neurology.

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Anxiety Moderates Amyloid-β Association With Cognition

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults, elevated amyloid-β (Aβ) levels correlate with cognitive decline, and elevated anxiety moderates these associations, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Sleeping Well in Middle Age May Pay Off Later in Life

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Sleeping well during middle age may be an investment that leads to better mental functioning later in life, a new review finds. The findings were published in the January issue of Perspectives on Psychological Science.

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Benefits Package Important for Attracting, Retaining Staff

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An appropriately-targeted benefits package is crucial for attracting and retaining employees, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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Cumulative Use of Anticholinergic Medication Tied to Dementia

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Higher cumulative use of anticholinergics may increase the risk of dementia, according to a new study published online Jan. 26 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Childhood Neglect Appears to Affect White Matter Integrity

MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood neglect is associated with changes in the brain's white matter, according to research published online Jan. 26 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Self-Management Program Cuts Depressive Symptoms in Diabetes

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with diabetes, a self-management-oriented group program (Diabetes Motivation Strengthening [DIAMOS]) is associated with reductions in depressive symptoms, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in Diabetes Care.

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Smaller Goals to Start Could Boost Activity in Sedentary

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Current targets call for 150 minutes of weekly exercise -- or 30 minutes of physical activity at least five days a week -- to reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although these standards don't need to be abandoned, they shouldn't be the primary message about exercise for inactive people, experts argue in two separate analyses published Jan. 21 in The BMJ.

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Reviews Summarize Efficacy of Depression Tx in Primary Care

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have summarized and clarified what is known about depression treatment in primary care. The reports have been published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Physicians Rank the Best EHR Systems of 2014

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have ranked electronic health record (EHR) systems based on five key performance areas, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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PTSD Therapies Deemed Safe for Patients With Comorbid Psychosis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with psychotic disorders and comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), prolonged exposure (PE) therapy and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy are safe and effective, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Docs Should Negotiate Health Care Payer Contracts

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The terms in health care payer contracts are not immutable, and contracts should be negotiated, according to an article published Jan. 9 in Medical Economics.

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Collaboration Between Med Students Cuts Diagnostic Errors

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For fourth-year medical students, working collaboratively is associated with a reduction in diagnostic errors, according to a research letter published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Bullying Linked to Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For 8- to 11-year-olds, bullying is associated with lower urinary tract symptoms, according to a study published in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Mindfulness Intervention De-Stresses Cancer Survivors

MONDAY, Jan. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A brief mindfulness-based intervention has a positive short-term effect on psychological and behavioral measures as well as proinflammatory signal markers in younger breast cancer survivors, according to a study published online Dec. 23 in Cancer.

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Most Docs Work 40 to 60 Hours Per Week

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians work long hours, with most working 40 to 60 hours per week and a considerable proportion working 61 to 80 or more hours per week, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Review: Venlafaxine May Be Effective for Fibromyalgia Tx

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Venlafaxine seems to be effective for the treatment of fibromyalgia, although studies are limited by small sample size and methodological concerns, according to a review published in the February issue of the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

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Impact of Medical Scribes on EHR Advancement Discussed

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The increasing use of medical scribes should not be a replacement for improving electronic health records (EHRs), according to a viewpoint piece published online Dec. 15 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Epidemic of Rx Opioid Abuse May Be Waning in U.S.

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. epidemic of prescription opioid medication abuse may be starting to reverse course, according to new research. The findings, published in the Jan. 15 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, suggest that recent laws and prescribing guidelines aimed at preventing abuse are working to some degree.

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Binge Eating Curtailed by Higher Doses of ADHD Medication

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- At higher doses, the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) drug lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (Vyvanse) curtails the excessive food consumption that characterizes binge-eating disorder, preliminary research suggests. The findings were reported online Jan. 14 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Light Therapy Seems Promising for Nonspecific Back Pain

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with chronic nonspecific back pain (CNBP), light therapy is associated with reduction in pain intensity and improvement in depressive symptoms, according to a study published in the December issue of Pain Medicine.

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FDA: Stimulation Device Approved to Treat Obesity

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new electrical stimulation device designed to control obesity by targeting the nerve pathways between the brain and stomach that regulate hunger and fullness has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Working Long Hours? Beware Risky Alcohol Consumption

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Working long hours may raise the risk for alcohol abuse, according to a new study of more than 300,000 people from 14 countries. The report was published online Jan. 13 in The BMJ.

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Providers Urged to Address Patient Fears in Chronic Fatigue

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Easing fears that exercise may worsen symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome is crucial in efforts to prevent disability in people with the condition, according to research published online Jan. 13 in The Lancet Psychiatry.

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Major Risks of Long-Term Opioid Rx Deemed Dose-Dependent

TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The long-term effectiveness and harms of opioids for chronic pain are unclear, although the evidence supports a dose-dependent risk for serious harms, according to a review published online Jan. 13 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Guidelines Presented for Clinical Documentation in 21st Century

TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Guidelines have been developed for clinical documentation and interrelated issues. The position paper has been published online Jan. 13 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Brief Well-Child Visit Inadequate for ID of Autism Risk

MONDAY, Jan. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The 10 to 20 minutes of a typical well-child visit isn't enough time to reliably detect a young child's risk of autism, according to new research published online Jan. 12 in Pediatrics.

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Providers Urged to Address Patients' Post-Cancer Concerns

MONDAY, Jan. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. cancer survivors have unresolved physical and mental health issues long after being cured, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in Cancer.

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High Rates of Missed Diagnoses of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

MONDAY, Jan. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Among youth, the rate of missed diagnosis or misdiagnosis of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders is 86.5 percent, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in Pediatrics.

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AMA Reports on How Docs Use Their Free Time

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American Medical Association recently surveyed physicians to find what activities they pursue when not in the exam room.

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CDC: Occupationally Acquired HIV Now Rare

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Documented occupational acquisition of HIV has now become rare in the United States, according to research published in the Dec. 9 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Tied to Development of T2DM

THURSDAY, Jan. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) seem more likely than others to develop type 2 diabetes, with severe PTSD almost doubling the risk, new research suggests. The study appears online Jan. 7 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Experts Discuss Pros and Cons of Maintenance of Certification

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The pros and cons of the American Board of Internal Medicine's (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) are discussed in two articles published in the Jan. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Article Highlights Top Technology Challenges for 2015

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The introduction of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10), Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) audits, meaningful use 2, and the burdens of technology are the top four technological challenges for physicians in 2015, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Article Highlights Top Management Challenges for 2015

MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Considerable challenges are projected to impact practice management in 2015, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Mediators Explain Paternal Depression, Child Behavior Link

MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The correlation between depression in fathers in the postnatal period and subsequent child behavior is mainly mediated by the family environment, according to a study published online Jan. 5 in Pediatrics.

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Review: SSRI Use Ups Risk of Upper GI Bleeding

MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use is associated with increased risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), according to a meta-analysis published in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Ketamine Produces Rapid-Onset Antidepressant Action

MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Ketamine has rapid-onset antidepressant action, although the mechanism of its positive effect is currently unclear, according to research published online Dec. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

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