January 2015 Briefing - OBGYN & Women's Health

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in OBGYN & Women's Health for January 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Colorectal Cancer Rates on Rise in Young Americans

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although the overall rate of colorectal cancer (CRC) has fallen in recent decades, new research suggests that over the last 20 years the disease has been increasing among young and early middle-aged American adults. Results of the study were published in the December issue of the Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology.

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VTE Risk Up in Older Women Post-Autologous Reconstruction

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- While the overall risk of complications from breast reconstruction after mastectomy does not appear to differ significantly between age groups, the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is higher for older women undergoing autologous reconstruction. The findings were published in the February issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

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Heavy Drinking in Middle Age Rivals HTN, DM As Stroke Risk

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People who average more than two drinks a day have a 34 percent higher risk of stroke compared to those whose daily average amounts to less than half a drink, according to findings published online Jan. 29 in Stroke.

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Cancer Diagnosis Impacts Patient Adherence to Diabetes Rx

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People with diabetes are less likely to take their diabetes medications if they've been diagnosed with cancer, researchers report. The findings were published online Jan. 28 in Diabetologia.

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National Prenatal Screening Program Increased CHD Detection

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of a national screening program in the Netherlands increased the prenatal detection rate of congenital heart disease (CHD), according to a study published online Jan. 27 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.

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CDC: ~8 Percent of U.S. Adults Nonadherent Due to Rx Costs

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in 10 American adults don't take their medications as prescribed because they can't afford to, according to a January data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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Less-Tight Control of Non-Severe BP in Pregnancy OK for Fetus

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When pregnant women have non-severe hypertension, more-intensive treatment doesn't seem to affect their babies, but it may lower the odds that mothers will develop severe hypertension. That's the conclusion of a clinical trial reported in the Jan. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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PCBs, Phthalates Linked to Earlier Menopause

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have found that menopause typically begins two to four years earlier in women with high levels of certain chemicals found in household items, personal care products, plastics, and the environment, compared to women with lower levels of the chemicals. The study was published online Jan. 28 in PLOS ONE.

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Triglycerides Significantly Elevated in Women With GDM

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), triglycerides are significantly elevated throughout pregnancy, according to a review published online Jan. 22 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.

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Benefits Package Important for Attracting, Retaining Staff

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An appropriately-targeted benefits package is crucial for attracting and retaining employees, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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AAFP Advocates for Planned Vaginal Birth After Cesarean

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A planned labor and vaginal birth after cesarean (LAC/VBAC) is an appropriate option for most women with a history of prior cesarean birth, according to a clinical practice guideline published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Postmenopausal Weight Loss or Gain Ups Risk of Fracture

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of fractures increases with both weight gain and loss in older women, according to a new study published Jan. 27 in The BMJ.

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Daily Blueberry Consumption May Reduce Blood Pressure

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For postmenopausal women with pre- and stage 1-hypertension, daily blueberry consumption may reduce blood pressure and arterial stiffness, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

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Increase in Biopsies With DCIS, Invasive CA After Mammogram

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For women undergoing screening mammography, there has been an increase in the percentage of biopsies with diagnoses of invasive carcinoma and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), according to a study published online Jan. 20 in Cancer.

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Sugary Drink Consumption Tied to Earlier Menarche

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Girls who consume a lot of sugary drinks may begin menstruating earlier than girls who don't, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in Human Reproduction.

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Women With PCOS Hospitalized More Often

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are at increased risk for a number of serious health problems, according to research published online Dec. 22 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Many Breast Cancer Patients Lack Knowledge of Their Disease

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many women with breast cancer lack basic knowledge about their disease, such as their cancer stage and other characteristics, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in Cancer.

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AAP Approves 2015 Vaccine Schedule for Children, Teens

MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The 2015 recommended childhood and adolescence immunization schedules have been approved by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and other medical organizations, according to a policy statement published online Jan. 26 in Pediatrics.

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HPV Vaccination Often Not Timely for Girls

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Only about half of American girls begin receiving the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine at the recommended age, according to a study published in the Jan. 29 issue of Vaccine.

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CDC: Opioid Rx Prevalent in Reproductive-Aged Females

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Too many women of childbearing age take prescription opioids, putting any unborn babies at risk, U.S. health officials said Thursday. The report appears in the Jan. 23 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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May Be Room for Improvement in U/S Transducer Hygiene

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For endoluminal procedures relying on barrier protection to avoid contamination, permeability of materials may not always be considered, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of Clinical Ultrasound.

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Optimal Gestational Weight Gain in Obese Moms May Vary

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For some obese women, gestational weight gain (GWG) below that recommended in the current guidelines may be advised to reduce the risk of certain adverse pregnancy outcomes, according to research published online Jan. 18 in Obesity Reviews.

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Smaller Goals to Start Could Boost Activity in Sedentary

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Current targets call for 150 minutes of weekly exercise -- or 30 minutes of physical activity at least five days a week -- to reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although these standards don't need to be abandoned, they shouldn't be the primary message about exercise for inactive people, experts argue in two separate analyses published Jan. 21 in The BMJ.

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ASCO Reports Biggest Clinical Cancer Advances for 2015

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The biggest clinical cancer advances for 2015 have been identified in an annual report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology, published online Jan. 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Hormonal Contraceptives Linked to Higher Risk of Glioma

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The risk for developing a glioma appears to go up with long-term use of hormonal contraceptives, new research suggests. The findings were published online in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Physicians Rank the Best EHR Systems of 2014

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have ranked electronic health record (EHR) systems based on five key performance areas, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Survival Rates for Extremely Premature Infants on Rise

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More extremely premature U.S. infants -- those born after only 22 to 28 weeks of gestation -- are surviving, according to a new study published in the Jan. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Omega-3s May Counteract Mercury Toxicity From Fish

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Despite concerns over mercury exposure, pregnant women who eat lots of fish may not harm their unborn children, a new study suggests. The study -- funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the Seychelles government -- was published online Jan. 21 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Risks for Ebola Virus-Infected Pregnant Women Discussed

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Ebola virus-infected pregnant women are at risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, according to an article published online Jan. 14 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.

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Prolonged Sitting Is Health Hazard, Despite Exercise

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise doesn't erase the higher risk of serious illness or premature death that comes from sitting too much each day, a new review reveals. The research is published in the Jan. 20 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection Rates Have Doubled

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although use of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has doubled in the past decade, the procedure is not always associated with better outcomes, according to a new study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The findings were published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Docs Should Negotiate Health Care Payer Contracts

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The terms in health care payer contracts are not immutable, and contracts should be negotiated, according to an article published Jan. 9 in Medical Economics.

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Collaboration Between Med Students Cuts Diagnostic Errors

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For fourth-year medical students, working collaboratively is associated with a reduction in diagnostic errors, according to a research letter published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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H. Pylori Tied to Lower Risk of Multiple Sclerosis in Women

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women who harbor the bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) may be less likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study published online Jan. 19 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

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Vitamin B-12, Folate Mitigate Reproductive Effects of DDT

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The adverse reproductive effects of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2,bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) seem to be mitigated by vitamin B-12 and folate sufficiency, according to a study published in the December issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Physicians Hit Barriers in Making Cancer Referrals

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many physicians report encountering barriers when referring cancer patients to specialty care, according to research published in the Jan. 1 issue of Cancer.

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Viral Load at Delivery in ~13 Percent of Women Taking HAART

MONDAY, Jan. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Among women who initiate highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) during pregnancy, 13.1 percent have detectable viral load (VL) at delivery, according to a study published online in the Jan. 20 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Many Americans Taking Meds Not to Be Mixed With Alcohol

MONDAY, Jan. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial number of Americans who drink also take medications that should not be mixed with alcohol, new government research suggests. The findings were published online Jan. 16 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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Mindfulness Intervention De-Stresses Cancer Survivors

MONDAY, Jan. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A brief mindfulness-based intervention has a positive short-term effect on psychological and behavioral measures as well as proinflammatory signal markers in younger breast cancer survivors, according to a study published online Dec. 23 in Cancer.

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Most Docs Work 40 to 60 Hours Per Week

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians work long hours, with most working 40 to 60 hours per week and a considerable proportion working 61 to 80 or more hours per week, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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CDC: U.S. Birth Rate at All-Time Low

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. birth rate remained at an all-time low in 2013, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday.

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Review: Venlafaxine May Be Effective for Fibromyalgia Tx

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Venlafaxine seems to be effective for the treatment of fibromyalgia, although studies are limited by small sample size and methodological concerns, according to a review published in the February issue of the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

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CDC: Neural Tube Defects Declining in the United States

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Neural tube defects have fallen 35 percent in the United States since mandatory folic acid fortification of enriched grain products was introduced in 1998; however, many American women who had a pregnancy affected by a neural tube defect and get pregnant again still don't follow folic acid supplement recommendations, federal officials reported Thursday. Both reports appear in the Jan. 16 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Women Underrepresented in Leadership Roles in Ob-Gyn

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women are underrepresented in leadership roles in obstetrics and gynecology, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Defensive Medicine Common Among Surgeons, Radiologists

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Defensive medicine is commonly practiced among surgeons and radiologists in Austria, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Impact of Medical Scribes on EHR Advancement Discussed

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The increasing use of medical scribes should not be a replacement for improving electronic health records (EHRs), according to a viewpoint piece published online Dec. 15 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Insulin Resistance Ups Breast Cancer Risk Regardless of BMI

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- After menopause, unhealthy insulin levels may predict breast cancer risk even more than excess weight, new research suggests. The study was published in the Jan. 15 issue of Cancer Research.

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Sedentary Lifestyle Worse for Health Than Obesity

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Being sedentary may be twice as deadly as being obese, a new study suggests. However, even a little exercise -- a brisk 20-minute walk each day, for example -- is enough to reduce the risk of an early death by as much as 30 percent, the British researchers added. The report was published online Jan. 14 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Aerobic Exercise Reduces Fatigue With Radiotherapy for Breast CA

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An aerobic exercise program can reduce fatigue in women undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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Working Long Hours? Beware Risky Alcohol Consumption

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Working long hours may raise the risk for alcohol abuse, according to a new study of more than 300,000 people from 14 countries. The report was published online Jan. 13 in The BMJ.

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Antenatal Corticosteroid Use Up, Even When Not Optimal

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 1988 to 2012, there were increases in the rates of optimal, suboptimal, and questionably appropriate administration of antenatal corticosteroids, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Obesity Up in Past Decade, but Diabetes Incidence Stable

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Trends show that diabetes incidence has stayed higher in recent decades than it was in the 1970s, although in the past decade, diabetes incidence remained steady despite the ongoing trend of rising adiposity, according to research published online Dec. 31 in Diabetes Care.

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Metabolic Sx Tied to Higher Risk of Endometrial Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A diagnosis of metabolic syndrome is associated with higher risk of endometrial cancer, regardless of whether the patient is considered obese, according to new research published in the January issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Race, Ethnicity Impact Breast Cancer Prognosis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The chances of being diagnosed with early breast cancer, as well as surviving it, vary greatly depending on race and ethnicity, according to a new study published Jan. 13 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Major Risks of Long-Term Opioid Rx Deemed Dose-Dependent

TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The long-term effectiveness and harms of opioids for chronic pain are unclear, although the evidence supports a dose-dependent risk for serious harms, according to a review published online Jan. 13 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Fewer Episiotomies, but Nonmedical Factors May Persist

TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of episiotomy has been declining since the 1990s because of concerns regarding related risks and benefits, researchers report in the Jan. 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Uninsured Visits to Community Health Centers Down Post-ACA

TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There was a 40 percent drop in uninsured visits to community health centers in states where Medicaid was expanded during the first half of 2014, when compared to the prior year, while Medicaid-covered visits to those clinics rose 36 percent, according to new research. The findings were published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Over 10 Percent of Patients Taking Aspirin Inappropriately

TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers found that of 68,808 U.S. adults prescribed aspirin long-term, 11.6 percent probably should not have been because their odds of suffering a heart attack or stroke were not high enough to outweigh the risks of daily aspirin use. The findings were published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Guidelines Presented for Clinical Documentation in 21st Century

TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Guidelines have been developed for clinical documentation and interrelated issues. The position paper has been published online Jan. 13 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Many Women Receive Unnecessary Hysterectomies

TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In many cases, treatments other than hysterectomies could be offered to women with benign gynecologic conditions, according to research published online Dec. 23 in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Providers Urged to Address Patients' Post-Cancer Concerns

MONDAY, Jan. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. cancer survivors have unresolved physical and mental health issues long after being cured, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in Cancer.

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Preterm Birth Risk Up for Women With Low Vitamin D

MONDAY, Jan. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have low blood levels of vitamin D during pregnancy are more likely to give birth prematurely, new research suggests. The study was published online Jan. 7 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Obesity in Diabetes Shortens Life, Ups Health Care Costs

MONDAY, Jan. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes patients, particularly those who are obese, are at risk for many life years lost and high lifetime health care expenses, according to research published online Dec. 31 in Diabetes Care.

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High Rates of Missed Diagnoses of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

MONDAY, Jan. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Among youth, the rate of missed diagnosis or misdiagnosis of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders is 86.5 percent, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in Pediatrics.

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Supine Sleep Position Linked With Higher Risk of Stillbirth

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women who sleep on their backs in the later months of pregnancy may have a relatively higher risk of stillbirth if they already have other risk factors, according to research published online Jan. 7 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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AMA Reports on How Docs Use Their Free Time

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American Medical Association recently surveyed physicians to find what activities they pursue when not in the exam room.

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Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate Tied to Higher HIV Risk

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The injectable birth control depot medroxyprogesterone acetate is associated with an increased risk of HIV infection in women, according to a review of research in Africa. Results of the review were published online Jan. 8 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Interim Guidance Issued for HPV Test As Pap Alternative

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The cobas human papillomavirus (HPV) test is an effective, one-test alternative to the current recommendation of screening with either a Pap test alone or a combination of the HPV test and a Pap test, according to an interim guidance report issued by the Society of Gynecologic Oncology and the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology.

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CDC: Occupationally Acquired HIV Now Rare

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Documented occupational acquisition of HIV has now become rare in the United States, according to research published in the Dec. 9 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Vasectomy Reversal Outcomes Up With Same Partner As Before

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fertility outcomes are improved for men who undergo vasectomy reversal and have the same female partner as before vasectomy, according to a study published in the January issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Education Intervention Ups Fruit, Vegetable Intake

THURSDAY, Jan. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A nutrition education intervention can increase fruit and vegetable intake among women with breast cancer, according to a study published in the January-February issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Tied to Development of T2DM

THURSDAY, Jan. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) seem more likely than others to develop type 2 diabetes, with severe PTSD almost doubling the risk, new research suggests. The study appears online Jan. 7 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Experts Discuss Pros and Cons of Maintenance of Certification

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The pros and cons of the American Board of Internal Medicine's (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) are discussed in two articles published in the Jan. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Universal Preconception Care Can Cut Pregestational DM Burden

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Universal preconception care (PCC) could prevent the substantial health and cost burden associated with pregestational diabetes mellitus (PGDM), according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Patients More Satisfied With Autologous Breast Reconstruction

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For women undergoing breast reconstruction, autologous reconstruction leads to higher satisfaction than alloplastic reconstruction, although more women require secondary correction, according to a study published in the January issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

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Article Highlights Top Technology Challenges for 2015

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The introduction of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10), Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) audits, meaningful use 2, and the burdens of technology are the top four technological challenges for physicians in 2015, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Diet Advice for CA Prevention: More Veggies, Less Alcohol

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Eating a plant-based diet and limiting alcohol intake may help lower the risk for obesity-related cancers, according to research published online Jan. 6 in Cancer Causes & Control.

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HPV Vaccination Not Linked to Higher Risk of Multiple Sclerosis

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine doesn't increase the risk for multiple sclerosis or other demyelinating diseases, according to a new study. The findings appear in the Jan. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Low Rate of Complications With Assisted Reproductive Technology

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Assisted reproductive technology procedures performed in the United States from 2000 to 2011 are associated with low risk of complications, according to a research letter published in the Jan. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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CDC: Outpatient Visits for Flu-Like Symptoms Up

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The current flu season, already off to a rough start, continues to get worse, with 43 states now reporting widespread flu activity and 21 child deaths so far, U.S. health officials said Monday.

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ACS Reports 22 Percent Drop in Cancer Mortality Over 20 Years

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Progress in the war against cancer has triggered a 22 percent drop in U.S. deaths over the past two decades, translating to about 1.5 million lives saved, according to a new report from the American Cancer Society.

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Article Highlights Top Management Challenges for 2015

MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Considerable challenges are projected to impact practice management in 2015, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Low Prevalence of Chlamydia, Gonorrhea Suggests Overscreening

MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For urban women aged 25 years and older, the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) is low, and women may be overscreened, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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