January 2015 Briefing - Diabetes & Endocrinology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Diabetes & Endocrinology for January 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Cancer Diagnosis Impacts Patient Adherence to Diabetes Rx

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People with diabetes are less likely to take their diabetes medications if they've been diagnosed with cancer, researchers report. The findings were published online Jan. 28 in Diabetologia.

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Cutting Added Fructose Could Reduce Diabetes-Linked Morbidity

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing consumption of added sugars, particularly added fructose, could reduce diabetes-related morbidity, according to an article published online Jan. 29 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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CDC: ~8 Percent of U.S. Adults Nonadherent Due to Rx Costs

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in 10 American adults don't take their medications as prescribed because they can't afford to, according to a January data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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PCBs, Phthalates Linked to Earlier Menopause

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have found that menopause typically begins two to four years earlier in women with high levels of certain chemicals found in household items, personal care products, plastics, and the environment, compared to women with lower levels of the chemicals. The study was published online Jan. 28 in PLOS ONE.

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Triglycerides Significantly Elevated in Women With GDM

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), triglycerides are significantly elevated throughout pregnancy, according to a review published online Jan. 22 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.

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Benefits Package Important for Attracting, Retaining Staff

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An appropriately-targeted benefits package is crucial for attracting and retaining employees, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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Women With PCOS Hospitalized More Often

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are at increased risk for a number of serious health problems, according to research published online Dec. 22 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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How Does DPP-4 Inhibition Affect Liver Function?

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibition may attenuate hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance induced by the Western diet (WD) through hepatic lipid remodeling and modulation of hepatic mitochondrial function, according to research published online Jan. 20 in Diabetes.

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Natpara OK'd to Treat Low Blood Calcium in Hypoparathyroidism

MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Natpara (parathyroid hormone) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to control hypocalcemia among people with hypoparathyroidism.

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Menu Calorie Data May Prompt Parents to Encourage Exercise

MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Parents might order fewer calories for their children if menus included calorie counts or information on how much walking would be required to burn off the calories in foods, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in Pediatrics.

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Smaller Goals to Start Could Boost Activity in Sedentary

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Current targets call for 150 minutes of weekly exercise -- or 30 minutes of physical activity at least five days a week -- to reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although these standards don't need to be abandoned, they shouldn't be the primary message about exercise for inactive people, experts argue in two separate analyses published Jan. 21 in The BMJ.

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Self-Management Program Cuts Depressive Symptoms in Diabetes

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with diabetes, a self-management-oriented group program (Diabetes Motivation Strengthening [DIAMOS]) is associated with reductions in depressive symptoms, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in Diabetes Care.

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Physicians Rank the Best EHR Systems of 2014

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have ranked electronic health record (EHR) systems based on five key performance areas, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Metabolic Syndrome May Raise Death Risk Postangiography

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For postangiography patients, metabolic syndrome is associated with increased mortality, especially in patients with stable angina, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Prolonged Sitting Is Health Hazard, Despite Exercise

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise doesn't erase the higher risk of serious illness or premature death that comes from sitting too much each day, a new review reveals. The research is published in the Jan. 20 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection Rates Have Doubled

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although use of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has doubled in the past decade, the procedure is not always associated with better outcomes, according to a new study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The findings were published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Roux-en-Y Surgery Can Reverse Insulin Treatment in T2DM

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) strongly predicts insulin cessation after surgery in insulin-treated type 2 diabetes (I-T2D) patients, independent of weight loss, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in Diabetes Care.

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Fewer Vegetable-Based Proteins Tied to Metabolic Syndrome

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Decreased vegetable protein intake and increased dietary acid load are associated with higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation.

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Collaboration Between Med Students Cuts Diagnostic Errors

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For fourth-year medical students, working collaboratively is associated with a reduction in diagnostic errors, according to a research letter published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Docs Should Negotiate Health Care Payer Contracts

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The terms in health care payer contracts are not immutable, and contracts should be negotiated, according to an article published Jan. 9 in Medical Economics.

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Vitamin B-12, Folate Mitigate Reproductive Effects of DDT

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The adverse reproductive effects of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2,bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) seem to be mitigated by vitamin B-12 and folate sufficiency, according to a study published in the December issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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n-3 Fatty Acids Cut Nonesterified Fatty Acid, T2DM Link

MONDAY, Jan. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) are associated with type 2 diabetes, and the association is modified by n-3 FA levels, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in Diabetes Care.

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Researchers Weigh in on Youth Pizza Consumption

MONDAY, Jan. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- On any given day in the United States in 2009 to 2010, one in five young children and nearly one in four teens ate pizza for a meal or snack, and when pizza is consumed, it makes up more than 20 percent of the daily intake of calories, according to findings reported online Jan. 19 in Pediatrics.

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Obesity More Expensive to Treat Than Smoking

MONDAY, Jan. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Annual health care expenses are substantially higher for smokers and the obese, compared with nonsmokers and people of healthy weight, according to a report published online Dec. 24 in Public Health. In fact, obesity is actually more expensive to treat than smoking on an annual basis, the report author concludes.

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Rx Adherence Lower for Patients New to Diabetes Therapy

MONDAY, Jan. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Factors associated with adherence to medications for treatment of diabetes include experience with diabetes therapy and related costs, thus efforts to reduce out-of-pocket costs may result in higher adherence, according to research findings published online Jan. 8 in Diabetes Care.

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BMI and Waist Circumference Are Frequently Discordant

MONDAY, Jan. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) are frequently discordant, generally because of variability in visceral adiposity (VAT) within BMI categories, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Most Docs Work 40 to 60 Hours Per Week

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians work long hours, with most working 40 to 60 hours per week and a considerable proportion working 61 to 80 or more hours per week, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Impact of Medical Scribes on EHR Advancement Discussed

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The increasing use of medical scribes should not be a replacement for improving electronic health records (EHRs), according to a viewpoint piece published online Dec. 15 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Insulin Resistance Ups Breast Cancer Risk Regardless of BMI

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- After menopause, unhealthy insulin levels may predict breast cancer risk even more than excess weight, new research suggests. The study was published in the Jan. 15 issue of Cancer Research.

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Sedentary Lifestyle Worse for Health Than Obesity

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Being sedentary may be twice as deadly as being obese, a new study suggests. However, even a little exercise -- a brisk 20-minute walk each day, for example -- is enough to reduce the risk of an early death by as much as 30 percent, the British researchers added. The report was published online Jan. 14 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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FDA: Stimulation Device Approved to Treat Obesity

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new electrical stimulation device designed to control obesity by targeting the nerve pathways between the brain and stomach that regulate hunger and fullness has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Working Long Hours? Beware Risky Alcohol Consumption

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Working long hours may raise the risk for alcohol abuse, according to a new study of more than 300,000 people from 14 countries. The report was published online Jan. 13 in The BMJ.

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Obesity Up in Past Decade, but Diabetes Incidence Stable

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Trends show that diabetes incidence has stayed higher in recent decades than it was in the 1970s, although in the past decade, diabetes incidence remained steady despite the ongoing trend of rising adiposity, according to research published online Dec. 31 in Diabetes Care.

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Guidelines Presented for Clinical Documentation in 21st Century

TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Guidelines have been developed for clinical documentation and interrelated issues. The position paper has been published online Jan. 13 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Moderately Increased Risk of Colorectal Cancer in T2DM

TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of colorectal cancer is moderately increased in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to research published online Dec. 31 in Diabetes Care.

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Research Suggests Diabetes Overtreatment in Seniors

MONDAY, Jan. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many older people with diabetes may be exposed to potential harm because doctors are trying to keep overly tight control of their blood glucose levels, according to research published online Jan. 12 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Preterm Birth Risk Up for Women With Low Vitamin D

MONDAY, Jan. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have low blood levels of vitamin D during pregnancy are more likely to give birth prematurely, new research suggests. The study was published online Jan. 7 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Obesity in Diabetes Shortens Life, Ups Health Care Costs

MONDAY, Jan. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes patients, particularly those who are obese, are at risk for many life years lost and high lifetime health care expenses, according to research published online Dec. 31 in Diabetes Care.

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AMA Reports on How Docs Use Their Free Time

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American Medical Association recently surveyed physicians to find what activities they pursue when not in the exam room.

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CDC: Occupationally Acquired HIV Now Rare

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Documented occupational acquisition of HIV has now become rare in the United States, according to research published in the Dec. 9 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Glucose Level in ER Could Aid Heart Failure Prognosis

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The measurement of blood glucose levels in patients arriving at emergency departments with acute heart failure could provide useful prognostic information and help improve outcomes in these patients, according to new research published online Jan. 8 in the European Heart Journal.

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Metformin's Potential Role in Atherosclerosis Explored

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Metformin's role in atherosclerosis may be inhibition of monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation via AMPK-mediated inhibition of STAT3 activation, according to research published online Dec. 31 in Diabetes.

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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Tied to Development of T2DM

THURSDAY, Jan. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) seem more likely than others to develop type 2 diabetes, with severe PTSD almost doubling the risk, new research suggests. The study appears online Jan. 7 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Intensive Management Lengthens Lifespan in T1DM

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus can reduce their overall risk of premature death by conducting multiple blood glucose tests throughout the day and constantly adjusting insulin levels to hit very specific blood glucose targets. These findings are published in the Jan. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Experts Discuss Pros and Cons of Maintenance of Certification

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The pros and cons of the American Board of Internal Medicine's (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) are discussed in two articles published in the Jan. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Sulfonylurea Rx Ups Testosterone Levels in Men With T2DM

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For middle-aged men with type 2 diabetes, sulfonylurea treatment is associated with improvements in total testosterone levels and testosterone secretion index values, according to a study published online Dec. 15 in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation.

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Universal Preconception Care Can Cut Pregestational DM Burden

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Universal preconception care (PCC) could prevent the substantial health and cost burden associated with pregestational diabetes mellitus (PGDM), according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Article Highlights Top Technology Challenges for 2015

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The introduction of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10), Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) audits, meaningful use 2, and the burdens of technology are the top four technological challenges for physicians in 2015, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Bariatric Surgery May Extend Life for Severely Obese Adults

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Bariatric surgery appears to prolong life for severely obese adults, according to a new study published in the Jan. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Low Rate of Complications With Assisted Reproductive Technology

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Assisted reproductive technology procedures performed in the United States from 2000 to 2011 are associated with low risk of complications, according to a research letter published in the Jan. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Excessive Kidney Concerns Prevent Metformin Use in T2DM

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Concerns about safety of metformin in renal impairment may be unnecessarily preventing its use in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), according to a research letter published online Jan. 5 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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CDC: Outpatient Visits for Flu-Like Symptoms Up

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The current flu season, already off to a rough start, continues to get worse, with 43 states now reporting widespread flu activity and 21 child deaths so far, U.S. health officials said Monday.

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Article Highlights Top Management Challenges for 2015

MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Considerable challenges are projected to impact practice management in 2015, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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For Men, Income Linked to Changes in Bone Mineral Density

MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For men, income, but not self-identified race/ethnicity or genetic ancestry, is associated with annualized percentage changes in bone mineral density (BMD), according to a study published in the December issue of the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

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