January 2015 Briefing - Cardiology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for January 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Recurrent Kidney Stones Linked to Arterial Calcium Deposits

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some people who develop recurring kidney stones may also have high levels of calcium deposits in their blood vessels, and that could explain their increased risk for cardiovascular disease, new research suggests. The findings were published online Jan. 29 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Isolated Systolic High BP in 30s May Up Risk of Earlier Death

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Isolated systolic high blood pressure in young adulthood is a predictor of cardiovascular disease mortality 30 years down the road, a new study suggests. The report was published in the Feb. 3 issue of Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Cardiovascular, Cerebral Effect for Red Bull + Mental Stress

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Red Bull consumption combined with mental stress correlates with increased blood pressure (BP) and heart rate, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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National Prenatal Screening Program Increased CHD Detection

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of a national screening program in the Netherlands increased the prenatal detection rate of congenital heart disease (CHD), according to a study published online Jan. 27 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.

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CDC: ~8 Percent of U.S. Adults Nonadherent Due to Rx Costs

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in 10 American adults don't take their medications as prescribed because they can't afford to, according to a January data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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Less-Tight Control of Non-Severe BP in Pregnancy OK for Fetus

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When pregnant women have non-severe hypertension, more-intensive treatment doesn't seem to affect their babies, but it may lower the odds that mothers will develop severe hypertension. That's the conclusion of a clinical trial reported in the Jan. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Following BP Guidelines Will Save Lives and Money

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- If all Americans had their hypertension under control, 56,000 fewer cardiovascular events would occur each year. And 13,000 fewer people would die -- without increasing health costs, according to research published in the Jan. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Cerebrovascular Reserve-Based Strategy Is Cost-Effective

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A decision rule based on assessment of cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) seems to be cost-effective for prevention of stroke in asymptomatic patients with carotid artery stenosis, according to a study published in the February issue of Radiology.

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Benefits Package Important for Attracting, Retaining Staff

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An appropriately-targeted benefits package is crucial for attracting and retaining employees, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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FDA to Strengthen Approval Process for AEDs

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Automated external defibrillators installed and ready for use in many public spaces can save lives when needed, but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says that since 2005, it has also received 72,000 reports of the devices failing.

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Daily Blueberry Consumption May Reduce Blood Pressure

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For postmenopausal women with pre- and stage 1-hypertension, daily blueberry consumption may reduce blood pressure and arterial stiffness, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

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Duration of Hyperlipidemia in 30s/40s Impacts CHD Risk

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People at age 55 who've lived with 11 to 20 years of high cholesterol show double the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) compared to people who age with only one to 10 years of high cholesterol, and quadruple the risk of people who had low cholesterol levels. These findings were published online Jan. 26 in Circulation.

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Difficulty Falling Asleep Linked to Higher Risk of Hypertension

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic insomniacs who regularly take longer than 14 minutes to fall asleep appear to be at a significantly increased risk for hypertension, according to research published online Jan. 26 in Hypertension.

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Benefit of Noninvasive Tests in Non-MI Chest Pain Questioned

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients seen in emergency departments solely for chest pain not due to myocardial infarction, noninvasive screening tests for coronary heart disease do not appear to benefit the prediction of future cardiovascular events, a new study suggests. The report was published online Jan. 26 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Impact of Intensive Lifestyle Change on CV Burden Studied

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive lifestyle modifications, the cornerstones of atherosclerotic disease management, are associated with a decrease in coronary and carotid atherosclerotic burden, according to a review published in the Jan. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Early Alert Intervention Cuts Heart Failure Readmission

MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An electronic medical record system, designed to identify patients who have been discharged from heart failure hospitalization and present in the emergency department, can prevent readmissions, according to a study published in The American Journal of Medicine.

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Higher Cardiovascular Risk Seen With Eczema

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with eczema may also have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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More Variation in Costs Than Outcomes of PCI in VA System

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the Veterans Affairs (VA) system, the variation in one-year risk-adjusted mortality is smaller than variation in risk-standardized costs, according to a study published in the Jan. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Smaller Goals to Start Could Boost Activity in Sedentary

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Current targets call for 150 minutes of weekly exercise -- or 30 minutes of physical activity at least five days a week -- to reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although these standards don't need to be abandoned, they shouldn't be the primary message about exercise for inactive people, experts argue in two separate analyses published Jan. 21 in The BMJ.

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Physicians Rank the Best EHR Systems of 2014

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have ranked electronic health record (EHR) systems based on five key performance areas, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Metabolic Syndrome May Raise Death Risk Postangiography

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For postangiography patients, metabolic syndrome is associated with increased mortality, especially in patients with stable angina, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Prolonged Sitting Is Health Hazard, Despite Exercise

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise doesn't erase the higher risk of serious illness or premature death that comes from sitting too much each day, a new review reveals. The research is published in the Jan. 20 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Routine Oral Anticoagulants May Not Benefit All With A-Fib

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Benefit from routine anticoagulation therapy to reduce risk of ischemic stroke may be unlikely in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 1, according to a study published in the Jan. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Cardiovascular Risks of Pneumonia May Linger for Years

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older patients hospitalized with pneumonia appear to have an increased risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, or death from coronary heart disease for years afterward, according to a new study published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Collaboration Between Med Students Cuts Diagnostic Errors

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For fourth-year medical students, working collaboratively is associated with a reduction in diagnostic errors, according to a research letter published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Ablation Effectiveness Quotient Predicts Clinical Success

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) who undergo AF ablation (AFA), a high ablation effectiveness quotient (AEQ) correlates with freedom from atrial tachyarrhythmia (AT), according to a study published online Jan. 15 in the Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology.

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Docs Should Negotiate Health Care Payer Contracts

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The terms in health care payer contracts are not immutable, and contracts should be negotiated, according to an article published Jan. 9 in Medical Economics.

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A Drink a Day May Keep Heart Failure at Bay

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Having a drink each day might help lower a middle-aged person's odds for heart failure, according to a new study published online Jan. 20 in the European Heart Journal.

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A Dash More Salt Than 1,500 mg Seems to Lower Mortality Risk

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A study of adults aged 71 to 80 indicates that daily consumption of 2,300 mg of salt didn't increase deaths, cardiovascular disease, stroke, or heart failure over 10 years. The report was published online Jan. 19 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Few Patients Fill High-Intensity Statin Rx After CHD Discharge

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Only about a quarter of Medicare beneficiaries fill a high-intensity statin prescription after discharge from hospitalization for a coronary heart disease (CHD) event, according to a study published in the Jan. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Dyslipidemia, High BP Prevalent Among U.S. Youth

MONDAY, Jan. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About one in five children and adolescents had adverse lipid concentrations, and one in ten had borderline high or high blood pressure (BP) in 2011 to 2012, according to research published online Jan. 19 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Google Glass Technology Less Reliable Than Paper ECG

MONDAY, Jan. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Google Glass technology for remote electrocardiogram (ECG) interpretation is significantly less reliable than paper ECG, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Obesity More Expensive to Treat Than Smoking

MONDAY, Jan. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Annual health care expenses are substantially higher for smokers and the obese, compared with nonsmokers and people of healthy weight, according to a report published online Dec. 24 in Public Health. In fact, obesity is actually more expensive to treat than smoking on an annual basis, the report author concludes.

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BMI and Waist Circumference Are Frequently Discordant

MONDAY, Jan. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) are frequently discordant, generally because of variability in visceral adiposity (VAT) within BMI categories, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Supplements Curb Isotretinoin-Associated Triglyceride Increase

MONDAY, Jan. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with preexisting hypertriglyceridemia, ω-3 fatty acid (ω-3FA) supplementation stabilizes the expected increase in triglycerides during isotretinoin therapy, according to research published in the January issue of JAMA Dermatology.

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Most Docs Work 40 to 60 Hours Per Week

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians work long hours, with most working 40 to 60 hours per week and a considerable proportion working 61 to 80 or more hours per week, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Caffeine Doesn't Affect Cardiac Conduction, Refractoriness in SVT

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with symptomatic supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), caffeine is associated with increases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, but does not impact cardiac conduction or refractoriness, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology.

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Four-Times Daily ASA More Effective in Post-CABG Patients

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, four-times daily acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA) seems more effective than once-daily 81 mg or 325 mg ASA, according to a study published online Dec. 27 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Active Breathing Coordinator Beneficial in RT for Left Breast CA

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with left breast cancer, radiation therapy with the Active Breathing Coordinator (ABC) can reduce the mean heart dose (MHD) by 20 percent or more, while preserving local control, according to a study published in the January-February issue of Practical Radiation Oncology.

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Impact of Medical Scribes on EHR Advancement Discussed

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The increasing use of medical scribes should not be a replacement for improving electronic health records (EHRs), according to a viewpoint piece published online Dec. 15 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Sedentary Lifestyle Worse for Health Than Obesity

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Being sedentary may be twice as deadly as being obese, a new study suggests. However, even a little exercise -- a brisk 20-minute walk each day, for example -- is enough to reduce the risk of an early death by as much as 30 percent, the British researchers added. The report was published online Jan. 14 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Working Long Hours? Beware Risky Alcohol Consumption

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Working long hours may raise the risk for alcohol abuse, according to a new study of more than 300,000 people from 14 countries. The report was published online Jan. 13 in The BMJ.

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Metabolic Sx Tied to Higher Risk of Endometrial Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A diagnosis of metabolic syndrome is associated with higher risk of endometrial cancer, regardless of whether the patient is considered obese, according to new research published in the January issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Benefit of Carotid Stenting in Elderly Called Into Question

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Mortality risk in older Medicare patients who undergo carotid artery stenting is high, according to a report published online Jan. 12 in JAMA Neurology.

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Community Efforts Saved Lives, Cut Costs in Maine

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Over four decades (1970 to 2010), a community-wide program in rural Franklin County, Maine, dramatically cut hospitalizations and deaths from cardiovascular disease and stroke, researchers report in the Jan. 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Guidelines Presented for Clinical Documentation in 21st Century

TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Guidelines have been developed for clinical documentation and interrelated issues. The position paper has been published online Jan. 13 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Over 10 Percent of Patients Taking Aspirin Inappropriately

TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers found that of 68,808 U.S. adults prescribed aspirin long-term, 11.6 percent probably should not have been because their odds of suffering a heart attack or stroke were not high enough to outweigh the risks of daily aspirin use. The findings were published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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AMA Reports on How Docs Use Their Free Time

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American Medical Association recently surveyed physicians to find what activities they pursue when not in the exam room.

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FDA Approves Novel Anticoagulant Savaysa

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Savaysa (edoxaban) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism, and prevent deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.

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Glucose Level in ER Could Aid Heart Failure Prognosis

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The measurement of blood glucose levels in patients arriving at emergency departments with acute heart failure could provide useful prognostic information and help improve outcomes in these patients, according to new research published online Jan. 8 in the European Heart Journal.

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CDC: Occupationally Acquired HIV Now Rare

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Documented occupational acquisition of HIV has now become rare in the United States, according to research published in the Dec. 9 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Metformin's Potential Role in Atherosclerosis Explored

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Metformin's role in atherosclerosis may be inhibition of monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation via AMPK-mediated inhibition of STAT3 activation, according to research published online Dec. 31 in Diabetes.

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Novel Anticoagulants Rapidly Adopted Into Clinical Practice

THURSDAY, Jan. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Novel anticoagulants have been rapidly adopted into clinical practice, and their use is associated with increased health care costs, according to a study published in the November issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

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In Glaucoma, High Blood Pressure May Hinder Rather Than Help

THURSDAY, Jan. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic hypertension may increase the risk of glaucoma, according to a study conducted in rats and published in the December issue of Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science.

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Experts Discuss Pros and Cons of Maintenance of Certification

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The pros and cons of the American Board of Internal Medicine's (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) are discussed in two articles published in the Jan. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Low Risk of Statin-Linked Hepatic Injury in Liver Disease

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic liver disease, statin initiation is associated with low overall incidence of hospitalization due to severe hepatic injury, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Article Highlights Top Technology Challenges for 2015

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The introduction of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10), Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) audits, meaningful use 2, and the burdens of technology are the top four technological challenges for physicians in 2015, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Variation in Ability to ID Inappropriate Nuclear Stress Test

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There is modest inter-rater reliability for the 2009 Appropriate Use Criteria for nuclear stress testing and inter-rater variability in identification of inappropriate tests, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Bariatric Surgery May Extend Life for Severely Obese Adults

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Bariatric surgery appears to prolong life for severely obese adults, according to a new study published in the Jan. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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CABG Deemed More Effective Than PCI for 2- or 3-Vessel CAD

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with coronary artery disease, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) is more effective but more costly than percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to research published in the Jan. 6 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Diet Rich in Whole Grains May Reduce Overall, CVD Mortality

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Each 1-ounce serving of whole grains can reduce a person's overall risk of mortality by 5 percent, and risk of mortality due to cardiovascular disease by 9 percent, according to findings published online Jan. 5 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Article Highlights Top Management Challenges for 2015

MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Considerable challenges are projected to impact practice management in 2015, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Health Care-Linked Infections Up Costs in Cardiac Surgery

MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Health care-associated infections (HAIs) are strongly linked to hospital costs, length of stay, and readmission, according to research published in the Jan. 6 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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