Intravenous Cyclosporine Doesn't Improve STEMI Outcomes

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Intravenous Cyclosporine Doesn't Improve STEMI Outcomes
Intravenous Cyclosporine Doesn't Improve STEMI Outcomes

MONDAY, Aug. 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Intravenous cyclosporine does not improve outcomes versus placebo in patients with anterior ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who had been referred for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The findings were published online Aug. 30 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the annual European Society of Cardiology Congress, held from Aug. 29 to Sept. 2 in London.

Thien-Tri Cung, M.D., from the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire in Montpellier, France, and colleagues conducted a multicenter trial involving 970 patients with an acute anterior STEMI who were undergoing PCI within 12 hours after symptom onset. Patients were randomized to receive a bolus injection of cyclosporine or matching placebo before coronary recanalization.

The researchers found that the rate of primary outcome (composite of death from any cause, worsening of heart failure during initial hospitalization, rehospitalization for heart failure, or adverse left ventricular remodeling at one year) was 59.0 and 58.1 percent in the cyclosporine and placebo group, respectively (odds ratio, 1.04; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.78 to 1.39; P = 0.77). The incidence of the separate clinical components of the primary outcome or other events was not reduced with cyclosporine.

"Cyclosporine did not reduce the risk of the composite outcome of death from any cause, worsening of heart failure during the initial hospitalization, rehospitalization for heart failure, or adverse left ventricular remodeling at one year," the authors write.

The study was partially funded by NeuroVive Pharmaceutical.

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