Injuries Up As Trampoline Parks Become More Popular

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Injuries Up As Trampoline Parks Become More Popular
Injuries Up As Trampoline Parks Become More Popular

MONDAY, Aug. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- As trampoline parks spring up across the United States, injuries to children have also increased, according to research published online Aug. 1 in Pediatrics.

The findings are based on records from a nationally representative sample of 100 hospital emergency departments. The research team found that U.S. emergency departments saw a 12-fold increase in the number of trampoline park injuries (TPIs) -- from 581 in 2010 to 6,932 in 2014 (P = 0.045), whereas home trampoline injuries (HTIs) did not increase (P = 0.13).

Children and teens accounted for most of those emergency department trips, with fractures and sprains the most common injuries. Boys, average age 13.3, were injured more often than girls. Compared with HTIs, TPIs were less likely to involve head injury, and more likely to involve lower extremity injury, and dislocation. TPIs were also more likely to warrant admission (including open fractures and spinal cord injuries).

"TPI patterns differed significantly from HTIs," the authors conclude. "TPIs are an emerging concern; additional investigation and strategies are needed to prevent injury at trampoline parks."

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