Hypothermia No Help When Cardiac Arrest Occurs in Hospital

This article originally appeared here.
Share this content:
Hypothermia No Help When Cardiac Arrest Occurs in Hospital
Hypothermia No Help When Cardiac Arrest Occurs in Hospital

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- While therapeutic hypothermia may help improve some outcomes, it doesn't appear to provide benefit when cardiac arrest happens in a hospital setting, according to a study published in the Oct. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Paul Chan, M.D., a professor of medicine at the Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute in Kansas City, Mo., and colleagues used a U.S. registry to collect data on 26,183 patients at 355 hospitals. The patients were resuscitated from in-hospital cardiac arrest between March 2002 and December 2014. Overall, 6.0 percent of the patients were treated with therapeutic hypothermia. The researchers compared those patients with patients not treated with hypothermia.

Hypothermia was associated with slightly lower in-hospital survival (27.4 versus 29.2 percent). In addition, hypothermia was associated with slightly lower rates of preserving mental ability (17.0 versus 20.5 percent). After a year, no survival advantage was seen with therapeutic hypothermia, the researchers reported.

"We were surprised that cooling was harmful," Chan told HealthDay. However, he added, "patients in the hospital are a lot sicker, which may be a reason cooling doesn't work."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease



Sign up for myCME e-newsletters




More in Home

FDA Approves First Generic Under-the-Tongue Suboxone

FDA Approves First Generic Under-the-Tongue Suboxone

May only be prescribed by Drug Addiction Treatment Act-certified prescribers

Kellogg's Honey Smacks Cereal Recalled Due to Salmonella Risk

Kellogg's Honey Smacks Cereal Recalled Due to <i>Salmonella</i> ...

Twenty-four people have been hospitalized, but no deaths have been reported

Portable Music Player Use Linked to Hearing Loss in Children

Portable Music Player Use Linked to Hearing Loss ...

Increased odds of high-frequency hearing loss with portable music player use

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »