Higher Incidence of Edema With Bacteriuria in C1-INH-HAE

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Higher Incidence of Edema With Bacteriuria in C1-INH-HAE
Higher Incidence of Edema With Bacteriuria in C1-INH-HAE

THURSDAY, Aug. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE), those with bacteriuria have a higher number of edematous attacks, according to a study published online Aug. 22 in Allergy.

Zsuzsanna Zotter, M.D., from Semmelweis University in Budapest, Hungary, and colleagues examined bacteriuria in the urinalysis of 139 C1-INH-HAE patients. The presence of bacteriuria was analyzed in relation to clinical symptoms.

The researchers found that the cumulative number of edematous attacks was higher in patients with versus those without bacteriuria, taking into account three randomly selected urine specimens (P = 0.019, 0.022, and 0.014). Considering the same patients, those with versus without bacteriuria had a significantly higher attack number (14.51 versus 8.63; P < 0.0001).

"In patients with bacteriuria, we found a higher incidence of edema formation during the year before evaluation, which may suggest the triggering role of bacteriuria in the occurrence of edematous episodes," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to the biopharmaceutical industry.

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