Health Care-Linked Infections Up Costs in Cardiac Surgery

Share this content:
Health Care-Linked Infections Up Costs in Cardiac Surgery
Health Care-Linked Infections Up Costs in Cardiac Surgery

(HealthDay News) -- Health care-associated infections (HAIs) are strongly linked to hospital costs, length of stay, and readmission, according to research published in the Jan. 6 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Giampaolo Greco, Ph.D., M.P.H., from the Icahn School of Medicine in New York City, and colleagues examined the costs associated with major types of HAIs in the two months following cardiac surgery. Data were collected prospectively from a multicenter, observational study in which patients were monitored for infections for 65 days after cardiac surgery. The authors estimated incremental length of stay and costs associated with HAIs among 4,320 cardiac surgery patients (mean age, 64 ± 13 years).

The researchers found that 2.8 percent of the patients experienced a major HAI during the index hospitalization. The most common HAIs were pneumonia, sepsis, and Clostridium difficile colitis (48, 20, and 18 percent, respectively). The incremental cost associated with a major HAI was estimated at nearly $38,000, with almost half (47 percent) related to intensive care unit services. The incremental length of stay was found to be 14 days. There were 849 readmissions, of which 8.7 percent were due to major HAIs. Compared with readmissions unrelated to HAIs, the costs were increased nearly three-fold for readmissions associated with major HAIs.

"These associations suggest the potential for large reductions in costs if HAIs following cardiac surgery can be reduced," the authors write.

Two authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

Trending Activities

All Professions



Sign up for myCME e-newsletters


More in Home

Pharmacists Should Counsel Patients Fasting for Ramadan

Pharmacists Should Counsel Patients Fasting for Ramadan

Pharmacists can suggest adjustments for meds taken several times per day, those affected by food intake

AUA: Many Have Unused Opioids After Urologic Procedures

AUA: Many Have Unused Opioids After Urologic Procedures

Patients use just over half of initial prescription; highest percentage of unused meds for cystectomy

Over Half of Young Adult Smoke Volume Exposure From Hookahs

Over Half of Young Adult Smoke Volume Exposure ...

Toxicant exposure to tar, carbon monoxide, nicotine lower, but still substantial, compared to cigarettes

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »