Growth in U.S. Health Spending Set to Average 5.8 Percent

This article originally appeared here.
Share this content:
Growth in U.S. Health Spending Set to Average 5.8 Percent
Growth in U.S. Health Spending Set to Average 5.8 Percent

FRIDAY, July 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Growth in U.S. health spending is expected to average 5.8 percent for 2015 to 2025, according to a study published in the July issue of Health Affairs.

Sean P. Keehan, from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in Baltimore, and colleagues explored projections for national health expenditure from 2015 to 2025.

The authors note that health spending growth from 2015 to 2025 is expected to average 5.8 percent, which is 1.3 percent faster than growth in the gross domestic product. By 2025, health spending is expected to represent 20.1 percent of the total economy. The initial impact associated with the Affordable Care Act is decreasing, and likely influences on the growth in health spending include changes in economic growth, faster growth in medical prices, and the aging population. The projected growth in national health spending is slower than in the two decades before the recent Great Recession, although it is faster than observed in recent history; growth is influenced in part by trends such as increasing cost sharing in private health insurance plans and Medicare payment update provisions. By 2025, the share of total health expenditures paid by federal, state, and local governments is expected to increase to 47 percent.

"The health sector is in the midst of a unique period, in which various forces are exerting differential pressures on health spending growth," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »


Sign up for myCME e-newsletters


Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

SABCS: Artificial Intelligence May Aid Doctors in Breast Cancer Care

SABCS: Artificial Intelligence May Aid Doctors in Breast ...

'Watson Oncology' agreed with doctors 90 percent of the time in many cases, researchers find

SABCS: Scalp-Cooling System Can Reduce Chemo-Related Hair Loss

SABCS: Scalp-Cooling System Can Reduce Chemo-Related Hair Loss

Devices reduce blood flow to hair follicles during chemotherapy treatments

SABCS: Aromatase Inhibitors Tied to Reduced Endothelial Function

SABCS: Aromatase Inhibitors Tied to Reduced Endothelial Function

Women on aromatase inhibitors exhibit less elasticity in their blood vessels

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »