Frustrated by Regulations, Doctors Increasingly Miserable

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Frustrated by Regulations, Doctors Increasingly Miserable
Frustrated by Regulations, Doctors Increasingly Miserable

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The nationwide Physician Misery Index is 3.7 out of 5, with the vast majority of physicians reporting that the business and regulation of health care has worsened the practice of medicine, according to a report published by Geneia.

Geneia conducted a nationwide survey among more than 400 physicians who practice medicine full time. According to the report, 67 percent of those surveyed know a physician who is likely to stop practicing in the next five years due to burnout. Fifty-one percent of doctors reported having considered career options outside of medicine. More than three-quarters of doctors (78 percent) reported frequently feeling rushed when seeing patients, and 87 percent say that the business and regulation of health care has worsened the practice of medicine.

Noting that the overall Physician Misery Index is 3.7 out of 5, Geneia and physicians have partnered to create the Joy of Medicine challenge, an online competition to solicit ideas to restore the meaning behind the practice of medicine. A panel of physicians together with peer-sourced online voting will judge the ideas and cash prizes will be awarded.

"Today's physician is juggling increasing demands, and the level of stress and burnout is escalating," Jennifer Joe, M.D., chief executive officer of Medstro, which is managing the challenge, said in a statement. "It's high time we involve physicians in creating solutions to restore their joy in practicing medicine," Joe added.

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