February 2017 Briefing - Orthopedics

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Orthopedics for February 2017. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Strategies Suggested to Protect Practices From Hackers

TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Steps should be taken to protect medical practices, including small practices, from hackers, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Diazepam Not Beneficial for Acute Low Back Pain in ER

TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- There is doubt as to whether diazepam provides benefit in the treatment of low back pain in the emergency department environment, according to a study published online Feb. 7 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

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Physician Burnout Eroding Sense of Calling

TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For physicians across specialties, burnout is associated with reduced odds of a sense of calling, according to a study published online Feb. 8 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Supreme Court Rules Patient Safety Data Subject to Litigation

MONDAY, Feb. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The Supreme Court of Florida has reversed a District Court of Appeal decision deeming information related to patient safety unprotected from litigation discovery, according to a report published from the American Medical Association.

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$20 Million Awarded for Quality Payment Program Training

FRIDAY, Feb. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- About $20 million has been awarded to 11 organizations for the first of a five-year program to provide training and education about the Quality Payment Program for clinicians in individual or small group practices, with up to $80 million to be invested over the remaining four years, according to the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

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Similar Outcomes for Disc Surgery in Older, Younger Patients

FRIDAY, Feb. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Older patients, over the age of 65, seem to experience the same lower back pain relief as their younger peers from surgery for a herniated lumbar disc, according to a research letter published online Feb. 22 in JAMA Surgery.

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Ultrasound Does Not Appear to Speed Up Fracture Healing

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) to help speed the healing of broken bones is an inefficient use of health care resources, according to a review and subsequent clinical practice guideline published online Feb. 21 The BMJ.

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Cyberattacks Remain Serious Threat to Health Providers

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Cyberattacks remain a serious threat to small providers as well as big institutions, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Health Information Theft a Pressing Concern for U.S. Patients

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Forty-four percent of U.S. adults are worried about having their personal health care information stolen, according to findings from the Xerox eHealth Survey published Feb. 9 in HIT Consultant.

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Pediatric ACL Injuries Continue to Rise, Especially Among Girls

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears has steadily increased among 6- to 18-year-olds in the United States, rising more than 2 percent a year over the last two decades, according to a report published online Feb. 22 in Pediatrics.

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Trials Highlight Benefits, Risks of Testosterone Treatment

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Testosterone treatment can boost bone density and reduce anemia in older men with low levels of the hormone, but it might also increase the risk of future adverse cardiovascular events, a new set of trials suggests. The research was published Feb. 21 in either the Journal of the American Medical Association or JAMA Internal Medicine.

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CMS Rule Set to Stabilize Small Health Insurance Markets

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has proposed a rule in relation to new reforms intended to stabilize individual and small group health insurance markets for 2018.

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Internet-Delivered Exercise, Pain-Coping Skills Alleviate Knee Pain

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An internet-delivered physical therapist-prescribed home exercise and pain-coping skills training (PCST) intervention is beneficial for individuals with chronic knee pain, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Insurance Status Linked to Patient Safety in Lumbar Fusion

MONDAY, Feb. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Insurance status is associated with adverse patient safety indicators (PSI) among patients undergoing inpatient lumbar fusion, according to a study published in the March issue of The Spine Journal.

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Increased Active Vitamin D May Help Optimize Muscle Strength

MONDAY, Feb. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- High blood levels of active vitamin D may increase muscle strength, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in PLOS ONE.

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Early PT Not Tied to Lower Health Care Use Later On

MONDAY, Feb. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Early use of physical therapy (PT) for new low back pain in older adults is not associated with less subsequent back pain-specific health care utilization, compared with patients not receiving early PT, according to a study published in the March issue of The Spine Journal.

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Higher ASA Class Not Tied to 30-Day Morbidity in Spinal Surgery

FRIDAY, Feb. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing single-level elective anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (SLE-ACDF), higher American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification is not associated with 30-day morbidity, according to a study published in the March issue of The Spine Journal.

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Health Care Spending Expected to Grow 5.6% Annually to 2025

THURSDAY, Feb. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Health care spending is expected to grow at an average annual rate of 5.6 percent from 2016 to 2025, according to a report published online Feb. 15 in Health Affairs.

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Patient Complaints of Surgeon Attitude Tied to Worse Outcomes

THURSDAY, Feb. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Patients treated by surgeons with a history of patient complaints regarding their personalities or attitude are at increased risk of surgical and medical complications, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in JAMA Surgery.

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Evidence of CTE Identified in Former Soccer Players

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For the first time, evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in retired soccer players has been confirmed, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in Acta Neuropathologica.

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Patient Knowledge of Radiation Involved in Spinal Imaging Poor

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Patients have a lack of understanding relating to radiation exposure associated with common spinal imaging modalities, according to a study published in the March issue of The Spine Journal.

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ACP Issues Guideline for Treating Acute, Subacute, Chronic LBP

TUESDAY, Feb. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- First-line therapy for patients with low back pain should be simple non-pharmacological remedies -- from heat wraps to physical therapy, according to a new clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians (ACP) published online Feb. 14 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Yoga Linked to Low Back Pain Relief, Improvement in Function

FRIDAY, Feb. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients experiencing low back pain, yoga may be an effective pain reliever, according to a review published online Jan. 12 in The Cochrane Library.

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Treatment of Hips Beneficial in Patients With Low Back Pain

MONDAY, Feb. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals presenting with a primary complaint of mechanical low back pain (LBP), prescriptive treatment of the hips seems beneficial in addition to treatment of the lumbar spine, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Comorbidities Up Resource Use in Pediatric Spinal Fusion

FRIDAY, Feb. 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For children with medical complexity undergoing spinal fusion, chronic respiratory insufficiency, bladder dysfunction, and epilepsy are significantly associated with hospital resource use, according to a study published online Feb. 2 in Pediatrics.

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NSAIDs Found to Be of Little Benefit to Patients With Back Pain

THURSDAY, Feb. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) don't help most patients with back pain, according to a review published online Feb. 2 in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

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Surgery Can Benefit T2DM Control for Patients With Lumbar Stenosis

THURSDAY, Feb. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Successful lumbar surgery is associated with improved glycemic control for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2), according to a study published in the February issue of The Spine Journal.

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Gout Linked to Increased Hip Fracture Risk in Women

THURSDAY, Feb. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For women, a history of gout is associated with increased risk of hip fracture, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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