February 2017 Briefing - Allergy

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Allergy for February 2017. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Strategies Suggested to Protect Practices From Hackers

TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Steps should be taken to protect medical practices, including small practices, from hackers, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Physician Burnout Eroding Sense of Calling

TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For physicians across specialties, burnout is associated with reduced odds of a sense of calling, according to a study published online Feb. 8 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Supreme Court Rules Patient Safety Data Subject to Litigation

MONDAY, Feb. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The Supreme Court of Florida has reversed a District Court of Appeal decision deeming information related to patient safety unprotected from litigation discovery, according to a report published from the American Medical Association.

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Inhaled Corticosteroids Not Linked to Pneumonia in Children

MONDAY, Feb. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) do not appear to be associated with the risk of pneumonia in children with asthma, according to a review published online Feb. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Early Use of Two Asthma Meds Could Prevent Lethal Pneumonia

MONDAY, Feb. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Two medications used to treat asthma and allergies may help prevent a particularly dangerous form of pneumonia caused by influenza A virus (IAV) infection, according to a study published online recently in PLOS Pathogens.

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$20 Million Awarded for Quality Payment Program Training

FRIDAY, Feb. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- About $20 million has been awarded to 11 organizations for the first of a five-year program to provide training and education about the Quality Payment Program for clinicians in individual or small group practices, with up to $80 million to be invested over the remaining four years, according to the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

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Cyberattacks Remain Serious Threat to Health Providers

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Cyberattacks remain a serious threat to small providers as well as big institutions, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Lanadelumab Active in Angioedema With C1 Inhibitor Deficiency

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency, the new kallikrein inhibitor lanadelumab is associated with reduced cleavage of high-molecular-weight kininogen and fewer angioedema attacks, according to a study published in the Feb. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Health Information Theft a Pressing Concern for U.S. Patients

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Forty-four percent of U.S. adults are worried about having their personal health care information stolen, according to findings from the Xerox eHealth Survey published Feb. 9 in HIT Consultant.

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CMS Rule Set to Stabilize Small Health Insurance Markets

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has proposed a rule in relation to new reforms intended to stabilize individual and small group health insurance markets for 2018.

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Health Care Spending Expected to Grow 5.6% Annually to 2025

THURSDAY, Feb. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Health care spending is expected to grow at an average annual rate of 5.6 percent from 2016 to 2025, according to a report published online Feb. 15 in Health Affairs.

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Sublingual Grass Pollen Immunotherapy Has Little Effect

TUESDAY, Feb. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Sublingual grass pollen immunotherapy is not associated with improved nasal response to allergen challenge versus placebo at three-year follow-up in adults with moderate-to-severe seasonal allergic rhinitis, according to a study published in the Feb. 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Reduced Immune Response After Intradermal Flu Shot in Eczema

MONDAY, Feb. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with moderate/severe atopic dermatitis (AD), those colonized with Staphylococcus aureus have a reduced immune response to intradermal influenza vaccination, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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AAP Provides Guidance on Anaphylaxis Emergency Plans

MONDAY, Feb. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- All caregivers for children at risk of anaphylaxis should have a written action plan and epinephrine auto-injectors readily available, according to two clinical reports from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online Feb. 13 in the Pediatrics.

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Variation in Prescribing Practices for Pediatric Atopic Dermatitis

MONDAY, Feb. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Prescribing practices vary among U.S. and Canadian physicians treating severe childhood atopic dermatitis (AD), according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Insomnia Associated With Higher Risk of Developing Asthma

THURSDAY, Feb. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Insomnia may increase the risk of asthma in adults, according to research published online Feb. 1 in the European Respiratory Journal.

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PD-1 Expression Tied to Chronic Rhinosinusitis With Nasal Polyps

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) expression is associated with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) disease severity, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in Allergy.

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