February 2016 Briefing - Psychiatry

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for February 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Analysis Reveals 'Female Libido' Pill May Not Be Worth It

MONDAY, Feb. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Flibanserin (Addyi), the "female libido" pill, appears to cause many serious side effects while failing to increase the desire for sexual activity, according to a review published online Feb. 29 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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No Increase in Depression for Supported Transgender Children

MONDAY, Feb. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Transgender children who have socially transitioned and are supported to live openly as the gender "opposite" their natal sex do not have elevations in depression, and have only slightly elevated anxiety, according to a study published online Feb. 26 in Pediatrics.

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Irritable Bowel Self-Management Strategies Sustainable

FRIDAY, Feb. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Comprehensive self-management (CSM) strategies are sustainable for patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to a study published in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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PTSD, Depression Common After Stem Cell Transplant

FRIDAY, Feb. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) meet the criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression at six months after the procedure, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of Cancer.

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Some Women Lack Interest in Sex With New Contraceptive

THURSDAY, Feb. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Almost one-quarter of women report lacking interest in sex at six months after initiating a new contraceptive method, compared to over 40 percent of women using no contraceptive method, according to a study published in the March issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Anxiety Tied to Ischemia During Exercise Testing for Women

FRIDAY, Feb. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For women without history of coronary artery disease (CAD), those with anxiety are more likely to exhibit ischemia during exercise testing than those without anxiety, according to a study published in the February issue of Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Active Mind May Delay Alzheimer Symptoms, but Not Disease

THURSDAY, Feb. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Intellectual enrichment (high education and high midlife cognitive activity) has effects on biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in older adults, according to a study published online Feb. 24 in Neurology.

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Zolpidem Use Linked to Motor Vehicle Collisions in Elderly

THURSDAY, Feb. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Zolpidem users, especially women and individuals aged ≥80 years, have higher rates of motor vehicle collisions (MVCs), according to a study published online in Sleep Medicine.

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Suggestions for Optimizing Practice Feedback Effectiveness

THURSDAY, Feb. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In an article published online Feb. 23 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, 15 suggestions are presented to optimize the effectiveness of practice feedback.

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Benzodiazepine Prescriptions Rose From 1996 to 2013

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Benzodiazepine prescriptions and overdose deaths increased considerably from 1996 to 2013, according to a study published online Feb. 18 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Mind-Body Intervention Can Improve Function, Pain in LBP

TUESDAY, Feb. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A mind-body intervention can improve short-term function and current and most severe pain for elderly patients with chronic low back pain (LBP), according to a study published online Feb. 22 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Quality of Life After DCIS Diagnosis Doesn't Decline

MONDAY, Feb. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Quality of life (QoL) after a ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) diagnosis is generally comparable to that of similarly aged women without the diagnosis, according to a study published online Feb. 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Botulinum Toxin Ups Physical, Mental Health in Hyperhidrosis

FRIDAY, Feb. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with hyperhidrosis, botulinum toxin treatment is associated with significant improvements in mental and physical health, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in the Journal of Dermatology.

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Testosterone Therapy Offers Modest Benefits for Older Men

THURSDAY, Feb. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Testosterone treatment may offer moderate benefit in improving sexual function in older men, but further research is needed to establish possible risks, according to research published in the Feb. 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Cannabis Use Not Linked to Risk of Mood, Anxiety Disorders

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Cannabis use is not associated with increased risk of mood or anxiety disorders, but is associated with increased risk of several substance use disorders within the general population, according to research published online Feb. 17 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Many Med Schools Appear Unwelcoming Regarding Disability

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Most medical schools need to post, update, or clarify technical standards (TSs), required under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), that detail what a school will do to accommodate a student with a disability, according to a study published online Jan. 19 in Academic Medicine.

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Nonmedical Stimulant Use Up Among Adults, Not Teens

TUESDAY, Feb. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Nonmedical stimulant use has increased among adults in recent years, according to a study published online Feb. 16 in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.

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USPSTF: Evidence Lacking for Routine Use of ASD Screening

TUESDAY, Feb. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concludes that the evidence is currently insufficient to weigh the balance of benefits and harms of screening for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in young children for whom no concerns of ASD have been raised. These findings form the basis of a recommendation statement published in the Feb. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Proton Pump Inhibitors Linked to Increased Dementia Risk

MONDAY, Feb. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may be tied to the development of dementia in the elderly, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in JAMA Neurology.

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CDC: Number of Uninsured Persons in U.S. Down Since 2013

FRIDAY, Feb. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The percentage of uninsured persons is decreasing in the United States, according to a report published by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Physicians Concerned By Increasing Cost of Generics

THURSDAY, Feb. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pennsylvania physicians have called for state- and national-level medical associations to take an active role in addressing the issue of increasing generic drug prices, according to an article published by the Pennsylvania Medical Society.

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Euthanasia/Assisted Suicide for Psychiatric Disorders Examined

THURSDAY, Feb. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients receiving euthanasia or assisted suicide (EAS) for psychiatric disorders are mainly women and most have chronic, severe conditions, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Cardiovascular Fitness, Exercise BP Linked to Brain Volume

THURSDAY, Feb. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Poor cardiovascular (CV) fitness and greater exercise blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) responses in middle age correlate with smaller brain volume later in life, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in Neurology.

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Incidence of Dementia Down in Framingham Heart Study

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of dementia decreased over three decades among participants in the Framingham Heart Study, according to research published in the Feb. 11 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Tasering Found to Cause Short-Term Cognitive Impairment

TUESDAY, Feb. 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Being shocked by a Taser stun gun can cause short-term cognitive impairment similar to dementia, according to a new study.

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Postpartum Hemorrhage Up With Specific Antidepressants

TUESDAY, Feb. 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors in late pregnancy is associated with increased risk of postpartum hemorrhage, according to a study published in the March issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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CBT May Work As Well As Meds in Major Depressive Disorder

TUESDAY, Feb. 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with major depressive disorder, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and antidepressants have similar efficacy, according to a clinical guideline published online Feb. 9 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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USPSTF Issues Final Recs on Youth Depression Screening

MONDAY, Feb. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for major depressive disorder (MDD) in children aged 12 to 18 years, but the evidence is currently inadequate to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for younger children. These findings form the basis of a final recommendation statement published online Feb. 9 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Three-Fold Increased Suicide Risk After Concussion

MONDAY, Feb. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of suicide is increased after concussion, particularly after concussions on weekends, according to a study published online Feb. 8 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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AMA Highlights Issues Relating to Medical Liability Reform

MONDAY, Feb. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Medical liability reforms are likely to be advanced and challenged in 2016, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Childhood ADHD Linked to Increased Obesity in Females

MONDAY, Feb. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with increased obesity in females, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Doctors Offer Suggestions for Electronic Health Records

FRIDAY, Feb. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians recently met in Seattle to discuss the difficulties and benefits associated with electronic health records (EHRs) in a third town hall meeting on the subject, according to a report published by the American Medical Association.

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Seven Tips Provided for Optimizing Practice Revenue

THURSDAY, Feb. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Business operations data represent a relatively untapped resource for optimizing practice revenue, and can indicate areas of strength and opportunities for improvement, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Patient-Centered System Recommended for Medical Billing

THURSDAY, Feb. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Simplification, consolidation, and real time point-of-care information could address the inefficiencies in the medical billing system, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online Feb. 2 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Video Games Offer Educational Methods for Med Students

THURSDAY, Feb. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Video games can play a role in medical education, offering new methods for teaching medical students, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Axonal Injury in Brain Trauma Tied to β-Amyloid Burden

THURSDAY, Feb. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Imaging studies suggest that the development of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) may be related to the presence of axonal damage, according to research published online Feb. 3 in Neurology.

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Minimal Benzodiazepine Exposure May Up Dementia Risk

THURSDAY, Feb. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with minimal exposure to benzodiazepine have a slightly increased risk of dementia, according to a study published online Feb. 2 in The BMJ.

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Therapist-Guided, Internet-Based CBT Superior for BDD

THURSDAY, Feb. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Therapist-guided, Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD-NET) is superior to online supportive therapy, according to a study published online Feb. 2 in The BMJ.

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Mercury From Seafood Not Tied to Brain Neuropathology

TUESDAY, Feb. 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Seafood consumption is associated with increased brain levels of mercury, but these levels are not associated with brain neuropathology, according to a study published in the Feb. 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Tips Presented for Encouraging Treatment Adherence

TUESDAY, Feb. 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Tips for increasing patient adherence to treatment plans include patient engagement and addressing barriers to adherence, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Few Adults Discuss Subjective Memory Complaints With Doctors

TUESDAY, Feb. 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Few adults aged 45 years or older with subjective memory complaints (SMCs) report discussing these with a health care professional, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Increasing Weight Loss From Mid- to Late-Life May Identify MCI Risk

MONDAY, Feb. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing weight loss from midlife to late life may be a marker for mild cognitive impairment (MCI), according to a study published online Feb. 1 in JAMA Neurology.

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