February 2016 Briefing - Pediatrics

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for February 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Late Surfactant Does Not Cut Duration of Ventilation in BPD

MONDAY, Feb. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Late administration of surfactant does not reduce the duration of ventilation in very preterm neonates with prolonged respiratory distress, according to research published online Feb. 29 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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No Increase in Depression for Supported Transgender Children

MONDAY, Feb. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Transgender children who have socially transitioned and are supported to live openly as the gender "opposite" their natal sex do not have elevations in depression, and have only slightly elevated anxiety, according to a study published online Feb. 26 in Pediatrics.

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Risk Higher in Younger Children for Tonsillectomy Complications

MONDAY, Feb. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Although many pediatric patients undergo tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy (T&A) in ambulatory settings, an inpatient setting may be safer for younger children who are at higher risk of complications, according to research published in online Feb. 25 in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.

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CDC: Zika Found in Nine U.S. Pregnancies

FRIDAY, Feb. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Five of nine pregnancies among U.S. women who were infected with the Zika virus have resulted in adverse outcomes, according to research published in the Feb. 26 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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No Evidence for Benefits of 'Vaginal Seeding'

FRIDAY, Feb. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The increasingly common practice of "vaginal seeding" in infants born by cesarean section is not without risks, according to an editorial published online Feb. 23 in The BMJ.

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Preemies Have Lasting Risk for Anesthesia Adverse Events

FRIDAY, Feb. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Preterm children have an increased risk of developing sedation/anesthesia adverse events, which continues up to age 23 years, according to a study published online Feb. 25 in Pediatrics.

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CDC: Flu Season Continues to Be Mild; Vaccine Is Effective

THURSDAY, Feb. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- This flu season continues to be mild, while the flu vaccine is working better than the one used last season, with an overall efficacy of 59 percent, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Suggestions for Optimizing Practice Feedback Effectiveness

THURSDAY, Feb. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In an article published online Feb. 23 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, 15 suggestions are presented to optimize the effectiveness of practice feedback.

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Early Weaning Linked to Reduced Risk of Atopic Dermatitis

THURSDAY, Feb. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Early weaning at age 4 to 5 months is associated with reduced risk of atopic dermatitis, according to a study published online Feb. 19 in Allergy.

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4vHPV Type Prevalence Down After Vaccine Introduction

TUESDAY, Feb. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Introduction of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has correlated with a reduction in quadrivalent HPV (4vHPV) type prevalence among females aged 14 to 19 and 20 to 24 years, according to a study published online Feb. 22 in Pediatrics.

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Increase in Availability of Donor Human Milk Over Time in NICUs

MONDAY, Feb. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- During recent years there has been an increase in the availability of donor human milk (DHM) in hospitals, according to a study published online Feb. 22 in Pediatrics.

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Teen Weight, Height Linked to Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

MONDAY, Feb. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Higher body weight and taller stature during adolescence are associated with increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), according to a study published online Feb. 22 in Cancer.

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Combination Treatment for Acne May Be Best in Most Cases

MONDAY, Feb. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An evidence-based guideline for the management of acne vulgaris has been published online Feb. 17 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Guidelines Developed for Suspected Zika in Children

MONDAY, Feb. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New guidelines have been developed for evaluation and testing of infants and children with possible Zika virus infection. The interim guidelines were published in the Feb. 19 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Birth Defects Not Up Significantly With Anti-TNFs in Pregnancy

MONDAY, Feb. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Birth defects are not significantly more prevalent among women receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents during pregnancy, according to a study published in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Fever Not Associated With Primary Tooth Eruption

MONDAY, Feb. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Gum irritation, irritability, and drooling, but not fever, are the most frequent signs of primary tooth eruption, according to a meta-analysis published online Feb. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Exercise May Offer Benefit in Adult, Juvenile Myositis

FRIDAY, Feb. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise may benefit patients with adult and juvenile myositis, according to research published online Feb. 8 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Feedback From High-Profile Messenger Can Cut Antibiotic Rx

FRIDAY, Feb. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Feedback from a high-profile messenger can reduce antibiotic prescribing on a national scale, according to a study published online Feb. 18 in The Lancet.

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Most Peds Subspecialists Find Positions Matching Their Goals

FRIDAY, Feb. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Most pediatric subspecialists find initial positions that match their professional and clinical goals, according to a study published online Feb. 19 in Pediatrics.

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Low-Dose Biplanar Radiography Can Measure Leg Length

THURSDAY, Feb. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Low-dose biplanar radiography (EOS) may perform as well as conventional computed tomography (CT) scans in assessing limb length, according to an experimental study published in the January issue of the Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics.

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Many Med Schools Appear Unwelcoming Regarding Disability

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Most medical schools need to post, update, or clarify technical standards (TSs), required under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), that detail what a school will do to accommodate a student with a disability, according to a study published online Jan. 19 in Academic Medicine.

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Obesity Ups Mortality Risk in Critically Ill Children

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Being overweight or obese is linked to increased mortality in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs), according to research published online Feb. 16 in Pediatrics.

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Delivery of Preventive Services to Infants Can Be Improved

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The reliability of delivering a bundle of preventive services to patients aged 0 to 14 months can be improved with innovative redesign, according to a study published online Feb. 17 in Pediatrics.

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USPSTF: Evidence Lacking for Routine Use of ASD Screening

TUESDAY, Feb. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concludes that the evidence is currently insufficient to weigh the balance of benefits and harms of screening for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in young children for whom no concerns of ASD have been raised. These findings form the basis of a recommendation statement published in the Feb. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Fish Intake During Pregnancy Tied to Offspring Growth

MONDAY, Feb. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- High maternal fish intake during pregnancy is associated with elevated risk of rapid growth in infancy, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Hypoxia Challenge Test Can ID Fitness to Fly in Neonates

MONDAY, Feb. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) fail hypoxia challenge testing (HCT) and cannot be deemed fit to fly, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in Pediatrics.

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Lower Oxygen Saturation Target Linked to Risks for Preemies

MONDAY, Feb. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Use of a lower oxygen saturation target in preterm infants is associated with increased risks, according to research published online Feb. 10 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Good Long-Term Outcomes for Fetal Myelomeningocele Surgery

MONDAY, Feb. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Fetal myelomeningocele (fMMC) surgery is associated with improved long-term functional outcomes, according to a study published in the February issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Net Returns Projected to Top Investment in Vaccines

MONDAY, Feb. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Projected immunizations are estimated to yield returns that are greater than costs in low- and middle-income countries during 2011 to 2020, according to a study published in the February issue of Health Affairs.

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CDC: Number of Uninsured Persons in U.S. Down Since 2013

FRIDAY, Feb. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The percentage of uninsured persons is decreasing in the United States, according to a report published by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Physicians Concerned By Increasing Cost of Generics

THURSDAY, Feb. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pennsylvania physicians have called for state- and national-level medical associations to take an active role in addressing the issue of increasing generic drug prices, according to an article published by the Pennsylvania Medical Society.

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Behavioral Interventions Can Cut Inappropriate Antibiotic Use

TUESDAY, Feb. 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Use of certain behavioral interventions can reduce the rates of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing during ambulatory visits for acute respiratory tract infections, according to a study published in the Feb. 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Decline in Severity of Metabolic Syndrome for U.S. Teens

TUESDAY, Feb. 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For U.S. adolescents, metabolic syndrome (MetS) severity decreased from 1999 to 2012, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in Pediatrics.

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USPSTF Issues Final Recs on Youth Depression Screening

MONDAY, Feb. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for major depressive disorder (MDD) in children aged 12 to 18 years, but the evidence is currently inadequate to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for younger children. These findings form the basis of a final recommendation statement published online Feb. 9 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Evidence Review

AMA Highlights Issues Relating to Medical Liability Reform

MONDAY, Feb. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Medical liability reforms are likely to be advanced and challenged in 2016, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Childhood ADHD Linked to Increased Obesity in Females

MONDAY, Feb. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with increased obesity in females, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Doctors Offer Suggestions for Electronic Health Records

FRIDAY, Feb. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians recently met in Seattle to discuss the difficulties and benefits associated with electronic health records (EHRs) in a third town hall meeting on the subject, according to a report published by the American Medical Association.

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No Eczema Benefit to Partially Hydrolysed Whey Formula

FRIDAY, Feb. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A partially hydrolysed formula containing a specific mixture of oligosaccharides does not prevent eczema in high-risk infants, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in Allergy.

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Seven Tips Provided for Optimizing Practice Revenue

THURSDAY, Feb. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Business operations data represent a relatively untapped resource for optimizing practice revenue, and can indicate areas of strength and opportunities for improvement, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Routine Amoxicillin Use of No Benefit in Acute Malnutrition

THURSDAY, Feb. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Routine use of amoxicillin does not improve nutritional recovery from uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition in children, according to research published in the Feb. 4 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Patient-Centered System Recommended for Medical Billing

THURSDAY, Feb. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Simplification, consolidation, and real time point-of-care information could address the inefficiencies in the medical billing system, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online Feb. 2 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Video Games Offer Educational Methods for Med Students

THURSDAY, Feb. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Video games can play a role in medical education, offering new methods for teaching medical students, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Physicians Should Actively Address Tackling in Football

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians should take a more active stand against tackle football, according to a perspective piece published in the Feb. 4 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Less Than Half of U.S. Infants Fully Vaccinated for Influenza

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Although full influenza vaccination coverage is increasing among children aged 6 to 23 months, less than half of children in the United States were fully vaccinated in the 2011 to 2012 influenza season, according to a study published online Feb. 2 in Pediatrics.

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Tips Presented for Encouraging Treatment Adherence

TUESDAY, Feb. 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Tips for increasing patient adherence to treatment plans include patient engagement and addressing barriers to adherence, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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2016 Childhood Immunization Schedule Released

TUESDAY, Feb. 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The 2016 recommended immunization schedule for children and adolescents has been approved, according to a policy statement published online Feb. 1 in Pediatrics.

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Errors During Delivery Rarely Cause Newborn Brain Damage

MONDAY, Feb. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Few cases of severe brain damage in newborns are due to errors made during delivery, according to a new, small study published online Jan. 21 in the Journal of Perinatology.

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Patients and Families Highlight Value of Nurse Practitioners

MONDAY, Feb. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients and their families believe that teams in acute and primary care are more effective when they include nurse practitioners, according to research published online Jan. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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Higher Fiber Intake in Youth Tied to Lower Breast Cancer Risk

MONDAY, Feb. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Higher fiber intake during adolescence and early adulthood correlates with reduced breast cancer risk, according to a study published online Feb. 1 in Pediatrics.

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Proton Radiotherapy May Be New Option for Peds Brain Tumor

MONDAY, Feb. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An open-label, phase 2 trial showed acceptable toxicity and survival rates for the use of proton radiotherapy in children with medulloblastoma. The findings were published online Jan. 29 in The Lancet Oncology.

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