February 2015 Briefing - Pulmonology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pulmonology for February 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

AMA: Key Steps for Minimizing Liability Risk in Telemedicine

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Key steps should be taken to minimize the potential risk of liability resulting from use of telemedicine, according to an article published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Incidence of Viral Pneumonia Up in Young Children

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Young children are at increased risk of becoming seriously ill with pneumonia -- but unlike in years past, the cause is usually a respiratory virus, according to a study published in the Feb. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Sleeping More Than Eight Hours a Night May Up Stroke Risk

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adults who sleep more than eight hours a night may face a higher risk of stroke, a new analysis suggests. The study was published online Feb. 25 in Neurology.

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Struggle With Routine Tasks Predicts Adverse CHF Outcomes

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Heart failure patients who struggle to perform daily tasks are at increased risk for hospitalization and death, according to a study published online Feb. 25 in Circulation: Heart Failure.

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Characteristics of Tuberculosis Source Cases Identified

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In 26 U.S. tuberculosis outbreaks the initial source case-patients had long incubation periods and were characterized by substance abuse, incarceration, and homelessness, according to a study published in the March issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Disease.

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Remote Patient Monitoring Sector Increasing Rapidly

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The remote patient monitoring sector is growing rapidly and could have a considerable impact on health care, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Patients Say Cost Matters Greatly in Choosing Doctor

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number one determining factor for selecting a doctor is whether the physician is in-network, according to a report published by Vitals.

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Doctors, Pharmacists Least Likely Health Pros to Divorce

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors appear less likely to get divorced than most other health care professionals, according to research published online Feb. 18 in The BMJ.

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Fear of Discrimination Keeps Many LGBT Med Students Silent

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fear of discrimination is a major reason why about one-third of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) medical students stay "in the closet," new research finds. The study was published online Feb. 16 in Academic Medicine.

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Article Emphasizes Importance of Apology in Medical Error

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Apology laws, which prohibit certain statements or expressions of sympathy by a physician from being admissible in a lawsuit, are unnecessary if physicians understand the importance of saying sorry and offering accountability after an error, according to an article published Feb. 4 in Medical Economics.

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Varenicline May Help Smokers Not Yet Ready to Quit

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Varenicline (Chantix) can boost the likelihood that cigarette smokers who aren't ready to stop cold turkey will cut down gradually, a new study suggests. The research appears in the Feb. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Seasonal Flu Vaccine Can Offer Cross-Protection Against H7N9

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Seasonal influenza vaccines trigger immune system protection against the H7N9 influenza virus, according to a study published online Feb. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Methylprednisolone Use Cuts Treatment Failure in Pneumonia

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia and high initial inflammatory response, methylprednisolone use is associated with decreased treatment failure, according to a study published in the Feb. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Mindfulness Program Helps Seniors Sleep Better

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Mindfulness meditation may help older adults get a better night's sleep, according to a study published online Feb. 16 in the JAMA Internal Medicine.

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High Deductible Plans Factor Into Physician-Patient Relationship

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In an environment where patients are increasingly aware of the costs of health care, physicians need to be prepared to address these issues with their patients, according to an article published Feb. 4 in Medical Economics.

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Productivity Growth in U.S. Hospitals During 2002 to 2011

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- During 2002 to 2011, U.S. hospitals experienced productivity growth in treating Medicare patients with heart attack, heart failure, and pneumonia, according to a study published in the February issue of Health Affairs.

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Patients Tend to Prefer Formal Physician Attire

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients often prefer physicians with formal attire and white coats, according to a systematic review published online Jan. 19 in BMJ Open.

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Exposure to Gas, Dust, Fumes Ups Risk of Mite Sensitization

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Occupational exposure to gas, dust, and fumes (GDF) increases the risk of mite sensitization, and is associated with asthma and wheeze in those who are mite-sensitized, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in Allergy.

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Latino Physician Shortage Has Worsened Since 1980

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 1980 to 2010 the Latino physician shortage worsened, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in Academic Medicine.

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Deaths Due to Smoking Underestimated in U.S.

THURSDAY, Feb. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- According to the U.S. Surgeon General, about 480,000 Americans die of smoking-related causes each year, but that figure may be closer to 540,000, researchers from the American Cancer Society report. The findings were published in the Feb. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Seven Tips Help Doctors Prepare for Meaningful Use Audits

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Given that physicians are chosen for meaningful use (MU) audits at random, the best way to prepare is for a physician to assume they will be audited, according to an article published Jan. 28 in Medical Economics.

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Americans' Complementary Health Approaches Changing

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Yoga is increasingly popular among U.S. adults and children, two new government surveys reveal. Both surveys, which were published Feb. 10 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), looked at the overall use of alternative or complementary medicine among Americans.

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Naps Counteract Negative Effects of Sleep Deprivation

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Brief daytime naps might protect against the harmful health effects of a poor night's sleep, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Lung-RADS Criteria Can Reduce False-Positive Result Rate

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of the American College of Radiology Lung Imaging Reporting and Data System (Lung-RADS) classification system for low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) can reduce the false-positive result rate but also decreases sensitivity, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Research Misconduct ID'd by FDA Often Unreported in Literature

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A review of U.S. Food and Drug Administration inspection reports between 1998 and 2013 revealed 57 clinical trials in which regulators had uncovered violations serious enough to earn the agency's most severe classification -- "official action indicated," or OAI. The findings were published online Feb. 9 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Confidence Not Accurate Measure of Prescribing Competence

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For medical students, self-reported confidence in prescribing only weakly correlates with actual competence, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Motivational Interviewing Can Help Reach Nonadherent Patients

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Motivational interviewing can be a useful approach for reaching noncompliant patients, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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Perspective on Dr. Davidson: 'Be Like Mike'

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The tragic shooting of surgeon Michael Davidson can be used as an opportunity to find meaning in tragedy, according to a perspective piece published online Feb. 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Lung Cancer Now Leads Cancer Mortality in Developed Nations

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Lung cancer has overtaken breast cancer as the leading cancer killer of women in developed countries, reflecting changing smoking patterns among females worldwide, according to a new report published online Feb. 4 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

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Secondhand Smoke Exposure Down But Still Too High

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although fewer Americans are smoking and more communities have smoke-free laws, 58 million nonsmokers are still being exposed to secondhand smoke, U.S. health officials said Tuesday. Findings from the new study were published in the Feb. 3 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Healthy Diet Independently Tied to Lower Risk of COPD

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A healthy diet might reduce the risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), new research suggests. The study was published Feb. 3 in The BMJ.

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AICR: Awareness of Key Cancer Risk Factors Alarmingly Low

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer than half of Americans are aware that some major lifestyle factors can affect their cancer risk, and many people worry about cancer-causing claims that aren't backed by scientific evidence, according to a survey conducted by the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR). The survey results were released Wednesday to coincide with World Cancer Day.

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A Little Jogging Goes a Long Way

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A little jogging is good for your health, researchers say, but too much might not be. The findings were published in the Feb. 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Too Many Hospitalized Heart Failure Patients on IV Fluids

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Potentially harmful intravenous (IV) fluids are being given to too many patients with severe heart failure, according to a new study published in the Feb. 1 issue of JACC: Heart Failure.

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Work-Related Asthma Underdiagnosed

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Only 15 percent of working adults with asthma discuss with their doctor how their jobs might affect their breathing, even though nearly half have asthma that is possibly work-related, according to a study published in the February issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. The researchers also found that doctors often don't bring up the topic with patients.

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Patient Engagement Can Cut Costs, Improve Outcomes

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patient engagement initiatives can decrease costs without sacrificing quality care, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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