February 2015 Briefing - Psychiatry

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for February 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

AMA: Key Steps for Minimizing Liability Risk in Telemedicine

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Key steps should be taken to minimize the potential risk of liability resulting from use of telemedicine, according to an article published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Stress Ups Risk of Peptic Ulcer Regardless of H. Pylori Status

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Psychological stress correlates with increased risk of peptic ulcer, with similar effects associated with Helicobacter pylori infection and ulcers unrelated to either H. pylori or use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, according to a study published in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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CBT, Sertraline Insufficient in Diabetes and Depression

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with diabetes and depression, improvements in depression are seen with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or sertraline, with a significant advantage for sertraline, but glycemic control remains unchanged with both treatments, according to a study published online Feb. 17 in Diabetes Care.

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Suicide Deemed Public Health Concern in Genitourinary Cancers

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Suicide is a public health concern for patients with genitourinary cancer, especially bladder cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 17 in Cancer.

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Essential Role for Pediatricians in Care of Sexual Exploitation Victims

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatricians have a role to play in identification and treatment of victims of child sex trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC), according to a clinical report published online Feb. 23 in Pediatrics.

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Noncancer Pain Patients Commonly Use Benzodiazepines

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) patients who use benzodiazepines (BZDs) daily frequently have multiple comorbid mental health conditions and higher rates of emergency health care use, according to a study published in the February issue of Pain Medicine.

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Patients Say Cost Matters Greatly in Choosing Doctor

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number one determining factor for selecting a doctor is whether the physician is in-network, according to a report published by Vitals.

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Fear of Discrimination Keeps Many LGBT Med Students Silent

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fear of discrimination is a major reason why about one-third of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) medical students stay "in the closet," new research finds. The study was published online Feb. 16 in Academic Medicine.

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Doctors, Pharmacists Least Likely Health Pros to Divorce

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors appear less likely to get divorced than most other health care professionals, according to research published online Feb. 18 in The BMJ.

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New Sleep Guidelines Issued by National Sleep Foundation

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For the youngest and oldest, the National Sleep Foundation has new guidelines on what constitutes a good night's rest. The new guidelines were developed by a panel of 12 experts who examined the findings of 320 studies, and were published online in Sleep Health: Journal of the National Sleep Foundation.

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Few Doctors Would Consider Euthanasia in Psychiatric Disease

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Few physicians would find euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (EAS) conceivable for patients with psychiatric disease, dementia, or those who are "tired of living," according to a study from the Netherlands published online Feb. 18 in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

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Article Emphasizes Importance of Apology in Medical Error

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Apology laws, which prohibit certain statements or expressions of sympathy by a physician from being admissible in a lawsuit, are unnecessary if physicians understand the importance of saying sorry and offering accountability after an error, according to an article published Feb. 4 in Medical Economics.

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Varenicline May Help Smokers Not Yet Ready to Quit

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Varenicline (Chantix) can boost the likelihood that cigarette smokers who aren't ready to stop cold turkey will cut down gradually, a new study suggests. The research appears in the Feb. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Noninvasive Neurotechnology Reduces Menopause Symptoms

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A noninvasive neurotechnology for autocalibration of neural oscillations is associated with a reduction in menopause-related symptoms, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in Menopause.

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Hot Flashes Linger Long After Final Menses in Many Women

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of women experience menopause-related hot flashes and night sweats for seven years or more, according to research published online Feb. 16 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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High Deductible Plans Factor Into Physician-Patient Relationship

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In an environment where patients are increasingly aware of the costs of health care, physicians need to be prepared to address these issues with their patients, according to an article published Feb. 4 in Medical Economics.

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Antipsychotic Rx Often Relates to Non-Approved Indications

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with dementia living in nursing homes, the provider's rationale for use of antipsychotic drug therapy frequently relates to indications for which these drugs are not approved, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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More Rapid Refeeding Protocol Seems Safe in Anorexia Nervosa

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Refeeding patients with anorexia nervosa to achieve more rapid weight gain can be safe and effective in a hospital-based protocol, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

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Picky Eating Usually Transient Among Preschool Children

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Picky eating is usually a transient behavior in early childhood, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

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Patients Tend to Prefer Formal Physician Attire

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients often prefer physicians with formal attire and white coats, according to a systematic review published online Jan. 19 in BMJ Open.

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Latino Physician Shortage Has Worsened Since 1980

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 1980 to 2010 the Latino physician shortage worsened, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in Academic Medicine.

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Seven Tips Help Doctors Prepare for Meaningful Use Audits

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Given that physicians are chosen for meaningful use (MU) audits at random, the best way to prepare is for a physician to assume they will be audited, according to an article published Jan. 28 in Medical Economics.

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Risk of Psychiatric Disorders Up for Children With T1DM

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Children with type 1 diabetes have an increased risk of psychiatric disorders, especially in the six months after diagnosis, according to a study published online Feb. 3 in Diabetes Care.

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Health Benefits of Moderate Drinking May Be Overestimated

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A review of 52,891 British people found little to no health benefit linked to alcohol consumption, once the results were adjusted for a range of personal, social, economic, and lifestyle factors. The findings were published Feb. 10 in The BMJ.

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Americans' Complementary Health Approaches Changing

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Yoga is increasingly popular among U.S. adults and children, two new government surveys reveal. Both surveys, which were published Feb. 10 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), looked at the overall use of alternative or complementary medicine among Americans.

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Naps Counteract Negative Effects of Sleep Deprivation

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Brief daytime naps might protect against the harmful health effects of a poor night's sleep, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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IOM Proposes New Criteria, Name for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic fatigue syndrome, a debilitating illness affecting up to 2.5 million Americans, may soon get a new name and set of diagnostic criteria.

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Mental Stress Adversely Affects MI Recovery in Younger Women

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In younger people with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stress may lead to a worse recovery and this may be of particular concern among women, a new study suggests. The report was published online Feb. 9 in Circulation.

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Research Misconduct ID'd by FDA Often Unreported in Literature

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A review of U.S. Food and Drug Administration inspection reports between 1998 and 2013 revealed 57 clinical trials in which regulators had uncovered violations serious enough to earn the agency's most severe classification -- "official action indicated," or OAI. The findings were published online Feb. 9 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Oxytocin in Labor Not Linked With Later ADHD in Child

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Augmentation of labor with the medication oxytocin does not seem to raise the risk of having a child with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online Feb. 9 in Pediatrics.

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Confidence Not Accurate Measure of Prescribing Competence

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For medical students, self-reported confidence in prescribing only weakly correlates with actual competence, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Elevated Risk of Psychiatric Dx in Adults Born Very Premature

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People who were born very preterm may be at higher risk of anxiety disorders and certain other mental health issues, even into their 30s, a new study suggests. The findings, published online Feb. 9 in Pediatrics, give a picture of how preemies fare as they move through adulthood.

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Review: Some Nonpharmacologic Tx Effective in Peds GI Disorders

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Certain nonpharmacologic treatments are effective in pediatric abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs), according to a review published online Feb. 9 in Pediatrics.

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Resting-State Connectivity Predicts Psychotherapy Response

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Resting-state functional brain connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fcMRI) can predict response to psychotherapy in major depressive disorder (MDD), according to a study published online Feb. 4 in Neuropsychopharmacology.

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Stress in America: Financial Worries Top the List

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Financial worries served as a significant source of stress for 64 percent of adults in 2014, ranking higher than three other major sources of stress: work (60 percent), family responsibilities (47 percent), and health concerns (46 percent), according to a report released Feb. 4, titled Stress in America: Paying With Our Health.

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Motivational Interviewing Can Help Reach Nonadherent Patients

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Motivational interviewing can be a useful approach for reaching noncompliant patients, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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APOE Allele Linked to Severity of Alzheimer's Disease

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The APOEε2 allele may be associated with a milder clinical and pathological course of Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to research published online Jan. 26 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Meaning-Centered Group Therapy Beneficial in Advanced Cancer

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Meaning-centered group psychotherapy (MCGP) is effective for reducing psychological distress and improving spiritual well-being in patients with advanced cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 2 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Perspective on Dr. Davidson: 'Be Like Mike'

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The tragic shooting of surgeon Michael Davidson can be used as an opportunity to find meaning in tragedy, according to a perspective piece published online Feb. 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Many Scientifically Inclined Prefer Certain Religious Accounts

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Perspectives on science and religion are complex, with many scientifically inclined individuals preferring certain religious accounts, according to an article published in the February issue of the American Sociological Review.

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Non-Pharmacological Options Efficacious in Treating Delirium

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Non-pharmacological alternatives for the treatment of delirium are available and beneficial, according to a review published online Feb. 2 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Patient Engagement Can Cut Costs, Improve Outcomes

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patient engagement initiatives can decrease costs without sacrificing quality care, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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FDA: Vyvanse Approved for Binge-Eating Disorder

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine dimesylate) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with binge-eating disorder.

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Estrogen May Lessen Cognitive Effects of Lead Exposure

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Estrogen and estradiol may help protect against lead's harmful effects on the frontal areas of the brain, according to a study published recently in the Journal of Environmental Health.

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Maternal Depression Up at Four Years Postpartum

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal depression is more common at four years postpartum than at any point during the first 12 months postpartum, and is more likely among women with only one child at four years postpartum, according to a study published in the February issue of BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.

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