February 2015 Briefing - Internal Medicine

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Internal Medicine for February 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

AMA: Key Steps for Minimizing Liability Risk in Telemedicine

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Key steps should be taken to minimize the potential risk of liability resulting from use of telemedicine, according to an article published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Oral Bisphosphonate Use Tied to Lower Endometrial Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For postmenopausal women, oral bisphosphonate use is associated with a reduction in the risk of endometrial cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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No Response to Statin May Mean More Rapid Atheroma Progression

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Twenty percent of people with coronary artery disease experience little or no reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol from statin treatment, according to research published online Feb. 26 in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

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Distinct Immune Changes Seen in Patients With Chronic Fatigue Sx

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) appears to be linked to specific changes in a person's immune system, particularly increased amounts of chemical messengers that regulate immune responses, researchers report. The new study was published online Feb. 27 in Science Advances.

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Dr. Craig Spencer Speaks Out About His Ebola Experience

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. politicians and media outlets hyped the threat of U.S. cases of Ebola last year, according to a newly written personal account by Craig Spencer, M.D., M.P.H., the last American Ebola patient treated in the United States. He also believes that officials and the media unnecessarily maligned those who were risking their lives to combat the West African epidemic.

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Screening for DM at Dental Visit May Be Effective Strategy

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The dentist's office may be a good place to screen people for diabetes, according to new research published online Feb. 25 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Stress Ups Risk of Peptic Ulcer Regardless of H. Pylori Status

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Psychological stress correlates with increased risk of peptic ulcer, with similar effects associated with Helicobacter pylori infection and ulcers unrelated to either H. pylori or use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, according to a study published in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Invasive Strategy Improves Outcome in Elderly With ACS

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An invasive strategy using coronary angiography results in a better outcome in elderly patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (ACS), according to research published in the March 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Abdominal Obesity Ups Risk of Hip Fracture

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Abdominal obesity is associated with increased risk of hip fracture, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Home Walking Program Improves Erectile Function After MI

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For men with recent acute myocardial infarction, a home-based walking program is associated with a reduction in reported erectile dysfunction (ED), according to a study published in the March 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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CBT, Sertraline Insufficient in Diabetes and Depression

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with diabetes and depression, improvements in depression are seen with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or sertraline, with a significant advantage for sertraline, but glycemic control remains unchanged with both treatments, according to a study published online Feb. 17 in Diabetes Care.

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Longer Needles Recommended for Epinephrine Autoinjectors

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Given the increasing epidemic of obesity, epinephrine autoinjectors (EAIs) for anaphylaxis require longer needles to ensure intramuscular injection, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in Allergy.

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Struggle With Routine Tasks Predicts Adverse CHF Outcomes

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Heart failure patients who struggle to perform daily tasks are at increased risk for hospitalization and death, according to a study published online Feb. 25 in Circulation: Heart Failure.

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Use of Injected Opioid Tied to HIV Outbreak in Indiana

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Addicts' use of a powerful painkiller is driving a large HIV outbreak in Indiana, according to health officials.

Health Highlights: Feb. 26, 2015

Sleeping More Than Eight Hours a Night May Up Stroke Risk

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adults who sleep more than eight hours a night may face a higher risk of stroke, a new analysis suggests. The study was published online Feb. 25 in Neurology.

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CDC: In U.S., Half Million C. Difficile Infections in 2011

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Almost half a million Americans were infected with the bacteria Clostridium difficile in 2011, and 29,000 died within a month of diagnosis, U.S. health officials say. The report is published in the Feb. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Shorter Hospital Stay Tied to Higher Mortality Post-Hip Fx

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older patients with a broken hip are more likely to die after the fracture if they're discharged from the hospital early, according to a study published Feb. 24 in The BMJ.

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Water Fluoridation Linked to Hypothyroidism in Britain

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A British study has found a correlation between the amount of fluoride in public drinking water and a rise in incidence of hypothyroidism. The findings were published online Feb. 24 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

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Location of Colorectal Cancer Factors Into Survival

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer that started on the left side may be more likely to survive than those whose disease originated on the right side, according to research published in the March issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Post-Op Mortality Low Among HIV Patients Prescribed ART

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with HIV infection receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) have increased 30-day postoperative mortality versus uninfected patients, although absolute incidence is low, according to a study published online Feb. 25 in JAMA Surgery.

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Younger Women Hesitate to Raise 'False Alarm' in MI

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Younger women may ignore early warning signs of an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), a new study reveals. The finding could help explain why younger women have higher rates of death from AMI than men in their age group. The study was published online Feb. 24 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Six-Month Dual Antiplatelet Tx Noninferior to 24-Month DAPT

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For aspirin-sensitive patients undergoing everolimus-eluting stent implantation, six-month dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is noninferior to 24-month DAPT, according to a study published in the March 3 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Review: More Whole Grains, Less Coronary Heart Disease

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Higher dietary intake of whole grains may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), according to a meta-analysis published in the March 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Success for 'Bionic Hand' Procedure in Three Patients

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In what scientists say is a first, a robotic hand controlled by a patient's own muscle and nerves appears to have restored complex hand function to a trio of amputees in Austria. The findings were reported online Feb. 24 in The Lancet.

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~4 Percent Increase in Primary Care Visits Expected With ACA

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The greater number of Americans with health insurance under the Affordable Care Act will lead to only a slight increase in the use of medical services, and the health system can cope with the added demand, according to a new report from The Commonwealth Fund.

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Characteristics of Tuberculosis Source Cases Identified

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In 26 U.S. tuberculosis outbreaks the initial source case-patients had long incubation periods and were characterized by substance abuse, incarceration, and homelessness, according to a study published in the March issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Disease.

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Suicide Deemed Public Health Concern in Genitourinary Cancers

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Suicide is a public health concern for patients with genitourinary cancer, especially bladder cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 17 in Cancer.

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Remote Patient Monitoring Sector Increasing Rapidly

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The remote patient monitoring sector is growing rapidly and could have a considerable impact on health care, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Even Short Term Use of NSAID With Anticoagulant Ill Advised

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) may raise the risk for myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and/or serious bleeding among MI survivors taking prescription anticoagulants, with no safe window period, according to new research. Bleeding risk rose even within the first three days of NSAID use, the team noted in a study published in the Feb. 24 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Bouts of Intense Anger Greatly Up Heart Attack Risk

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Intense anger or anxiety greatly increases the risk of acute myocardial infarction (MI), according to a new study published online Feb. 23 in the European Heart Journal: Acute Cardiovascular Care.

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SVR Rates Up With New Regimens for HCV and HIV Coinfection

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 and HIV coinfection, new regimens are effective and correlate with high rates of sustained virologic response (SVR) after treatment, according to two studies published online Feb. 23 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Quality of Care Lacking for ESRD in Lupus Nephritis

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, minorities and those who lack private insurance are less likely to receive adequate care for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) due to lupus nephritis (LN), according to research published online Feb. 18 in Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Low Vitamin D May Be More Closely Tied to DM Than Obesity

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People with low levels of vitamin D appear to have an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, even if they aren't overweight or obese, a new study suggests. The findings were published online Feb. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Frequent Sauna Use Linked to Heart Health Benefits in Men

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Men who use saunas frequently may be less likely to die from heart disease, according to research published online Feb. 23 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Undiagnosed/Untreated HIV Implicated in Most New Cases

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Undiagnosed and untreated people with HIV may be responsible for more than nine out of 10 new infections, according to research published online Feb. 23 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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CDC Investigating Newly Discovered Tick-Borne Virus

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An otherwise healthy man in Kansas became infected with a newly discovered type of virus after he was bitten by ticks, and he died of a related illness 11 days later, health official reported Friday. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention team noted that the newly identified virus is a novel member of the genus Thogotovirus, which has been linked to transmission by ticks and mosquitoes in parts of Europe, Asia, and Africa.

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Chikungunya Virus Infection Can Mimic Rheumatoid Arthritis

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus causes joint pain and swelling similar to rheumatoid arthritis, which can make diagnosis difficult, according to research published online Jan. 20 in Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Proton Pump Inhibitor Use Not Linked to Cardiac Arrhythmia

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In critically ill patients, proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use is not associated with cardiac arrhythmia, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Noncancer Pain Patients Commonly Use Benzodiazepines

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) patients who use benzodiazepines (BZDs) daily frequently have multiple comorbid mental health conditions and higher rates of emergency health care use, according to a study published in the February issue of Pain Medicine.

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Patients Say Cost Matters Greatly in Choosing Doctor

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number one determining factor for selecting a doctor is whether the physician is in-network, according to a report published by Vitals.

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Researchers Question Benefits of Treadmill Desks

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study may dampen some of the enthusiasm about treadmill desks. Researchers found that the desks are expensive, challenging to incorporate into an office setting, and may do little to boost meaningful activity levels. Findings from the study were published recently in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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Americans Living Longer Post-Cancer, but Disparities Remain

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Survival rates are improving for many people with cancers of the breast, prostate, lung, liver, and colon or rectum, especially for those diagnosed at younger ages, according to research published online Feb. 19 in JAMA Oncology.

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Radiation Therapy Most Common Treatment for Prostate Cancer

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that a wait-and-watch approach for prostate cancer isn't being used often enough, and that more men are being treated than may be necessary. The study appears online Feb. 19 in JAMA Oncology.

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FDA: People With Peanut Allergy Should Avoid Cumin Products

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A huge recall of products that contain cumin spice possibly contaminated with peanut has been ongoing in the United States since December, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning people with peanut allergy to avoid cumin and all products that contain cumin.

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Fast-Replicating HIV Strains Damage Immune System Earlier

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fast-replicating strains of HIV damage the immune system in the very early stages of infection, resulting in quicker disease progression, according to a study published online Feb. 17 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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CDC: Increase in Hypothermia Deaths Over Past Decade

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More people are dying from hypothermia in the United States, according to research published in the Feb. 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Ebola Transmitted Via Cough Possible, Not Likely

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Based on prior evidence, health workers dealing with Ebola primarily have worried about disease transmission from a patient's blood, vomit, and feces, all of which contain high levels of virus as symptoms progress, but health care workers also might need to worry about a patient's cough, authors speculate online Feb. 19 in mBio.

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Lack of Sleep Tied to Increased Levels of Free Fatty Acids

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research helps explain why getting too little sleep might boost diabetes risk. The study was published online Feb. 19 in Diabetologia.

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Duodenoscopes Infected With CRE at UCLA Med Center

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Endoscopes that were used to perform digestive procedures between October and January were contaminated with carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae, California hospital officials said Thursday.

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HealthDay/Harris Poll: Americans Still Divided Over ACA

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Affordable Care Act remains one of the most significant -- and controversial -- achievements of President Barack Obama's presidency. And Americans remain deeply divided over the health-care reform law that was signed by Obama five years ago, a HealthDay/Harris Poll released Thursday found.

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Household Movement Benefits Elderly With Mobility Issues

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults with physical impairments, simply reducing sedentary time benefits heart health, according to a study published online Feb. 18 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Unhealthy Outpacing Healthy Eating in Most World Regions

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although people around the world are eating more healthy foods, that positive trend has been outpaced by a rising consumption of unhealthy foods, according to research published in the March issue of The Lancet Global Health.

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Breast Milk Consumption Trending Among Body Builders

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some bodybuilders are drinking human breast milk in the mistaken belief it will give a boost to their muscles.

Health Highlights: Feb. 18, 2015

'Remission' Replaces 'Functional Cure' in HIV Case

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- All babies born with HIV should receive the same rapid medical response as the young Mississippi girl born with the virus who suffered a disappointing relapse last July, despite the fact that the virus later reappeared, according to a letter published in the Feb. 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Varicella Zoster Linked to Giant Cell Arteritis

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research links the varicella zoster virus to giant cell arteritis. The study was published online Feb. 18 in Neurology.

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Doctors, Pharmacists Least Likely Health Pros to Divorce

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors appear less likely to get divorced than most other health care professionals, according to research published online Feb. 18 in The BMJ.

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Fear of Discrimination Keeps Many LGBT Med Students Silent

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fear of discrimination is a major reason why about one-third of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) medical students stay "in the closet," new research finds. The study was published online Feb. 16 in Academic Medicine.

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Fatigue, Distraction Play Role in Risk of Low Back Pain

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Significant risk factors for low back pain include fatigue, manual labor involving awkward positions, and being distracted during an activity, according to research findings reported online Feb. 9 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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New Sleep Guidelines Issued by National Sleep Foundation

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For the youngest and oldest, the National Sleep Foundation has new guidelines on what constitutes a good night's rest. The new guidelines were developed by a panel of 12 experts who examined the findings of 320 studies, and were published online in Sleep Health: Journal of the National Sleep Foundation.

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Few Doctors Would Consider Euthanasia in Psychiatric Disease

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Few physicians would find euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (EAS) conceivable for patients with psychiatric disease, dementia, or those who are "tired of living," according to a study from the Netherlands published online Feb. 18 in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

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Article Emphasizes Importance of Apology in Medical Error

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Apology laws, which prohibit certain statements or expressions of sympathy by a physician from being admissible in a lawsuit, are unnecessary if physicians understand the importance of saying sorry and offering accountability after an error, according to an article published Feb. 4 in Medical Economics.

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Cost-Effectiveness of Immediate HCV Rx in Early Disease Analyzed

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV), immediate treatment seems to be cost-effective in those with moderate and advanced fibrosis, and can be cost-effective in patients with no or minimal fibrosis, according to a study published online Feb. 11 in Hepatology.

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Cancer Survivors Need Healthful Lifestyle Advice

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Clinical interventions should be implemented to help cancer survivors make lifestyle behavior changes, according to research published online Feb. 13 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

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Many Women Not Receiving Recommended Radiation Tx

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many American women with locally-advanced breast cancer do not receive recommended radiation therapy after mastectomy, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

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Post-Electrophysiology Mortality Usually Not Related to Procedure

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Half of major complications within 30 days of electrophysiology (EP) procedures occur after discharge, but the majority of deaths are not directly related to the procedure, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in the Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology.

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Seasonal Flu Vaccine Can Offer Cross-Protection Against H7N9

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Seasonal influenza vaccines trigger immune system protection against the H7N9 influenza virus, according to a study published online Feb. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Varenicline May Help Smokers Not Yet Ready to Quit

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Varenicline (Chantix) can boost the likelihood that cigarette smokers who aren't ready to stop cold turkey will cut down gradually, a new study suggests. The research appears in the Feb. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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CDC: Biggest Rise in Recent Measles Cases in Illinois

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number of measles cases in the United States has reached 141 patients in 17 states and the District of Columbia, federal health officials reported Tuesday.

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'Most Comprehensive Map' of Human Epigenomes Presented

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists have issued a comprehensive map of human epigenomes -- the range of chemical and structural shifts that determine how genes govern health. The group published the new map online Feb. 18 in Nature, accompanied by simultaneous publication in six other sister journals.

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Eliglustat Safely Reverses Manifestations of Gaucher's

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A novel oral substrate reduction therapy, eliglustat, can safely reverse clinical manifestations in untreated adults with Gaucher's disease type 1, according to a study published in the Feb. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Fondaparinux Found to Effectively Treat NSTEMI

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In a new study, patients who received fondaparinux to treat non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) had a lower risk of major bleeding and death compared to patients who received low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH). The findings were published in the Feb. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Cardiovascular Health Calculators Overestimate Actual Risk

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Four of five widely used formulas may overestimate people's risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) by as much as 154 percent in some cases, according to research published in the Feb. 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine. That includes the most recently developed risk calculator, unveiled alongside new treatment guidelines in 2013 by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA).

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Methylprednisolone Use Cuts Treatment Failure in Pneumonia

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia and high initial inflammatory response, methylprednisolone use is associated with decreased treatment failure, according to a study published in the Feb. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Observation Increasingly Used in Younger Men With Prostate CA

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Observation is increasingly being used among men with low-risk prostate cancer who are young and healthy enough for treatment, according to a study published in the March issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Increasing Dietary Fiber Leads to Other Healthy Changes

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A simple high-fiber diet can provide health benefits while being easier to stick with than a diet calling for multiple changes in eating habits, according to research published in the Feb. 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Young Adult Sore Throat Could Be Due to F. Necrophorum

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fusobacterium necrophorum is responsible for one in five sore throats in young adults, a new study suggests. The report was published in the Feb. 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Rates of Injury From Chiropractic Care Assessed in Older Adults

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For older Medicare beneficiaries with a neuromusculoskeletal complaint, the risk of injury is lower after an office visit for chiropractic spinal manipulation versus evaluation by a primary care physician, according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of Spine.

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Moderate Exercise Twice Weekly Lowers CV Risk in Women

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Even a few bouts of moderate exercise each week can cut a middle-aged woman's odds for coronary heart disease (CHD), venous thromboembolism (VTE), and stroke, according to new research, and exercising more frequently or strenuously may not provide greater reductions in cardiovascular risk. The findings were published online Feb. 16 in Circulation.

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Wide Variation in Hospital Tx Patterns for Metastatic CRC

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), there is wide variation in hospital treatment patterns, according to a study published online Jan. 29 in Cancer.

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High Deductible Plans Factor Into Physician-Patient Relationship

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In an environment where patients are increasingly aware of the costs of health care, physicians need to be prepared to address these issues with their patients, according to an article published Feb. 4 in Medical Economics.

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Mindfulness Program Helps Seniors Sleep Better

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Mindfulness meditation may help older adults get a better night's sleep, according to a study published online Feb. 16 in the JAMA Internal Medicine.

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At Least 4 to 5 Percent Weight Loss Needed to Cut Diabetes Risk

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For Japanese men with visceral fat accumulation and hemoglobin A1C (A1C) of 5.6 to 6.4 percent, minimization of the risk of diabetes requires a minimum of 4 to 5 percent weight loss, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation.

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Productivity Growth in U.S. Hospitals During 2002 to 2011

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- During 2002 to 2011, U.S. hospitals experienced productivity growth in treating Medicare patients with heart attack, heart failure, and pneumonia, according to a study published in the February issue of Health Affairs.

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More Rapid Refeeding Protocol Seems Safe in Anorexia Nervosa

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Refeeding patients with anorexia nervosa to achieve more rapid weight gain can be safe and effective in a hospital-based protocol, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

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Many Adults Maintain Adequate Vitamin D With Minimal UVR

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many adults maintain adequate serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels even in periods of minimal ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure, according to a study published online Feb. 3 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Antipsychotic Rx Often Relates to Non-Approved Indications

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with dementia living in nursing homes, the provider's rationale for use of antipsychotic drug therapy frequently relates to indications for which these drugs are not approved, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Use of Nondrug, Nonsurgical Options Low in Hip, Knee OA

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Usage of nondrug, nonoperative interventions in community-dwelling individuals with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) is low, according to research published in the February issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Lycopene Inversely Linked to Renal Cell Carcinoma Risk

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For postmenopausal women, lycopene intake seems to be inversely associated with the risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of Cancer.

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Various Strategies Used by Patients With HIV, Chronic Pain

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with HIV and chronic pain, various pain self-management strategies are employed, including physical activity, cognitive and spiritual strategies, and substance use, according to a study published online Feb. 3 in Pain Medicine.

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Patients Tend to Prefer Formal Physician Attire

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients often prefer physicians with formal attire and white coats, according to a systematic review published online Jan. 19 in BMJ Open.

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Limited Evidence on Management of Dyslipidemia in HIV

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A detailed guide has been presented for clinicians who manage dyslipidemia in HIV-infected patients. The guide, based on and extrapolated from guidelines for the general population, has been published online Feb. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Prevalence of Fibromyalgia Varies With Criteria Applied

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of fibromyalgia varies with the different sets of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria, according to a study published in the February issue of Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Osteoporosis-Treated Adults Have Elevated Risk of Mortality

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women and men below age 70 who are treated for osteoporosis have an excess mortality risk, according to a study published online Feb. 7 in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

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Latino Physician Shortage Has Worsened Since 1980

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 1980 to 2010 the Latino physician shortage worsened, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in Academic Medicine.

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Targeted Panel Testing Superior for Neuromuscular Diseases

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Targeted panel testing has the highest clinical yield for molecular diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases (NMDs), according to a study published in the February issue of the Annals of Neurology.

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Cancer Patients Rarely Demand Unnecessary Treatment, Tests

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer patients rarely request unnecessary tests or treatments, according to a study published online Feb. 12 in JAMA Oncology.

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ASCO Endorses ACS Guideline for Prostate CA Survivor Care

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has endorsed the American Cancer Society (ACS) Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines, according to a report published online Feb. 9 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Exposure to Gas, Dust, Fumes Ups Risk of Mite Sensitization

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Occupational exposure to gas, dust, and fumes (GDF) increases the risk of mite sensitization, and is associated with asthma and wheeze in those who are mite-sensitized, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in Allergy.

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Kidney Failure Risk in CKD Up With High-Acid, Meat-Rich Diet

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients struggling with chronic kidney disease who routinely consume meat-rich, highly-acidic diets may boost their risk for kidney failure, according to research published online Feb. 12 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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HIV+ to HIV+ Kidney Transplantation May Be Feasible

THURSDAY, Feb. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research from South Africa suggests that HIV may not be a barrier for kidney transplants between people infected with the virus. The study appears in the Feb. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Deaths Due to Smoking Underestimated in U.S.

THURSDAY, Feb. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- According to the U.S. Surgeon General, about 480,000 Americans die of smoking-related causes each year, but that figure may be closer to 540,000, researchers from the American Cancer Society report. The findings were published in the Feb. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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MetS Prevalent Among Seniors at Risk of Mobility Disability

THURSDAY, Feb. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults at high risk of mobility disability, metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Specific NSAIDs Increase Nonfatal Ischemic Stroke Risk

THURSDAY, Feb. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of specific nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), diclofenac and aceclofenac, is associated with increased risk of nonfatal ischemic stroke, according to a study published online Jan. 22 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Mammography Rates Down Since 2009 USPSTF Guidelines

THURSDAY, Feb. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Since the publication of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines for mammography in 2009, there has been a decrease in mammography rates among white, Hispanic, and Asian women, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Seven Tips Help Doctors Prepare for Meaningful Use Audits

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Given that physicians are chosen for meaningful use (MU) audits at random, the best way to prepare is for a physician to assume they will be audited, according to an article published Jan. 28 in Medical Economics.

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AMA: Use American Heart Month to Focus on Patients' BP

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As part of American Heart Month, physicians are encouraged to focus on patients' blood pressure, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Hepatitis B Screening Endorsed Pre-Immunosuppressive Tx

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- All patients undergoing chemotherapy or immunosuppressive therapies should undergo routine screening for active or prior hepatitis B viral infection, according to research published in the February issue of Hepatology.

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ICDs May Provide Little Benefit When Implanted Over Age 70

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) may not benefit all patients to the same degree, as their effectiveness seems to diminish somewhat with the advancing age of the patient, according to a review published online Feb. 10 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality Outcomes.

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Health Benefits of Moderate Drinking May Be Overestimated

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A review of 52,891 British people found little to no health benefit linked to alcohol consumption, once the results were adjusted for a range of personal, social, economic, and lifestyle factors. The findings were published Feb. 10 in The BMJ.

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Low Childhood Vitamin D Levels May Up Adult CVD Risk

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adults who had low vitamin D levels as children and teens may be more likely to have atherosclerosis, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Americans' Complementary Health Approaches Changing

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Yoga is increasingly popular among U.S. adults and children, two new government surveys reveal. Both surveys, which were published Feb. 10 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), looked at the overall use of alternative or complementary medicine among Americans.

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More Donor Hearts Discarded Even As Need Grows

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Even as the need for heart transplants increases, more donor hearts are being discarded, with a new study showing that only one in three donated hearts finds a recipient. The new report was published online Feb. 10 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Findings Do Not Support Creatine for Parkinson's Rx

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Creatine monohydrate doesn't appear to slow the progression of Parkinson's disease, according to research published in the Feb. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Iron Supplements Speed Blood Donation Recovery

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Low-dose iron supplements speed blood donors' recovery of iron and hemoglobin, new research shows. The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-funded study was published in the Feb. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Naps Counteract Negative Effects of Sleep Deprivation

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Brief daytime naps might protect against the harmful health effects of a poor night's sleep, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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IOM Proposes New Criteria, Name for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic fatigue syndrome, a debilitating illness affecting up to 2.5 million Americans, may soon get a new name and set of diagnostic criteria.

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BP Meds Benefit Diabetes Patients, Even Without HTN

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new analysis indicates that people with type 2 diabetes are less likely to suffer myocardial infarctions, strokes, or early mortality when they take blood pressure medications -- even if they don't actually have hypertension. The study was published in the Feb. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Smoking Impairs Rx Response in Axial Spondyloarthritis

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking may hamper the effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors used to treat axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), according to a study published online Feb. 9 in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

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ABIM Implements Changes to MOC Program

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) has changed or suspended several of the recent revisions made to its Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program, to the satisfaction of American medical organizations, according to an article published Feb. 3 in Medical Economics.

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Mental Stress Adversely Affects MI Recovery in Younger Women

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In younger people with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stress may lead to a worse recovery and this may be of particular concern among women, a new study suggests. The report was published online Feb. 9 in Circulation.

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Research Misconduct ID'd by FDA Often Unreported in Literature

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A review of U.S. Food and Drug Administration inspection reports between 1998 and 2013 revealed 57 clinical trials in which regulators had uncovered violations serious enough to earn the agency's most severe classification -- "official action indicated," or OAI. The findings were published online Feb. 9 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Lung-RADS Criteria Can Reduce False-Positive Result Rate

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of the American College of Radiology Lung Imaging Reporting and Data System (Lung-RADS) classification system for low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) can reduce the false-positive result rate but also decreases sensitivity, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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ACC/AHA Risk Score No Better for Identifying Elevated CAC in RA

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) 10-year risk score does not improve identification of those with elevated cardiovascular risk based on high coronary artery calcification (CAC) scores, according to a study published in the February issue of Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Multidisciplinary Approach Successful in Chronic Back Pain

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medication combined with a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program can decrease disability and improve mental health in low back pain patients over several years, according to a study published online Dec. 26 in the International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.

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Advantages of Shorter Resident Shifts Found Lacking

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Shorter shifts for medical residents don't appear to be making any big improvements in doctors' fatigue levels or in patient care, new research shows. The study was published online Feb. 9 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Eight Clinical Signs of Impending Death Identified

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they have identified eight specific physical signs that strongly indicate impending death in patients with advanced cancer. The findings have been reported online Feb. 9 in Cancer.

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Confidence Not Accurate Measure of Prescribing Competence

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For medical students, self-reported confidence in prescribing only weakly correlates with actual competence, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Some Angiotensin Receptor Blockers More Potent Than Others

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Different angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have distinct potencies for suppressing adrenal β-arrestin1 (βarr1)-dependent post-myocardial infarction (MI) hyperaldosteronism, according to a letter published in the Dec. 30 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Smartphone ECGs Have Similar Accuracy to Standard ECGs

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Wireless, single-lead real-time smartphone electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring accurately detects baseline intervals and atrial rate and rhythm, according to a study published online Feb. 5 in the Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology.

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Motivational Interviewing Can Help Reach Nonadherent Patients

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Motivational interviewing can be a useful approach for reaching noncompliant patients, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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Soy Food, Isoflavone Intake Not Linked to Endometrial Cancer

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Soy food/isoflavone intake is not associated with endometrial cancer risk in Japanese women, according to a study published in the February issue of BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.

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Occupation, Work Hours Linked to Workers' Risk for Neck Pain

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Occupation and work hours are associated with increased workers' risk for neck pain, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of Spine.

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High Coffee Intake Linked With Lower Risk of Endometrial Cancer

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- High versus low intake of coffee is associated with a reduced risk for endometrial cancer, according to a new study published in the February issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Mortality Risk of T1DM Higher for Women

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women with type 1 diabetes have a nearly 40 percent greater risk of dying from any cause and more than double the risk of dying from heart disease than men with type 1 diabetes, according to a report published online Feb. 5 in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

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U.S. Lyme Disease Costs Could Exceed $1 Billion Annually

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- With an estimated 240,000 to 440,000 new cases of Lyme disease diagnosed every year, the illness costs the U.S. health care system between $712 million and $1.3 billion annually, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in PLOS ONE.

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ABFM: No Change to Maintenance of Certification Requirements

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In response to the announcement of changes to the Maintenance of Certification (MOC) requirements from the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM), the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) has announced that it will not be making changes to the requirements for maintaining certification at this time.

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Two Novel Genetic Variants for Breast Cancer Discovered

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists say they have identified two new genetic variants that are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Their findings are published online Feb. 4 in Human Molecular Genetics.

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Prompt, Aggressive BP Management Encouraged

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with systolic blood pressure higher than 150 mm Hg face increased risks without aggressive drug treatment started within a month and a half, according to research findings published Feb. 5 in The BMJ.

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CDC: HIV-Related Mortality Disparities Persisting for Blacks

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of HIV-related mortality is still highest among blacks, and over half of all newly identified HIV-positive persons are black, according to two reports published in the Feb. 6 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Perspective on Dr. Davidson: 'Be Like Mike'

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The tragic shooting of surgeon Michael Davidson can be used as an opportunity to find meaning in tragedy, according to a perspective piece published online Feb. 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Contraception Info Given With Isotretinoin Rx Ups Safe Use

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say giving birth control information to women visiting dermatology clinics can help promote the safe use of isotretinoin. The study was published online Feb. 4 in JAMA Dermatology.

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Smartphone Accessory Could Help Detect HIV, Syphilis

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A smartphone accessory that can detect HIV and syphilis has been developed by Columbia University researchers. The findings were published in the Feb. 4 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Low Adherence to Daily HIV Prophylaxis in High-Risk Women

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In a population of predominantly young, unmarried women in sub-Saharan Africa, daily adherence to oral or vaginal tenofovir-based formulations was low, and no regimen significantly reduced the risk of HIV-1 acquisition. The study was published in the Feb. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Prehospital Magnesium Sulfate Doesn't Benefit Stroke Outcomes

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with suspected stroke, prehospital magnesium sulfate therapy is safe but does not impact the degree of disability at 90 days, according to a study published in the Feb. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Lung Cancer Now Leads Cancer Mortality in Developed Nations

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Lung cancer has overtaken breast cancer as the leading cancer killer of women in developed countries, reflecting changing smoking patterns among females worldwide, according to a new report published online Feb. 4 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

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ABIM: Immediate Changes Announced for MOC Program

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In response to concerns from internists and medical specialty societies, immediate changes are being made to the Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program, according to correspondence from the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM).

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Healthy Diet Independently Tied to Lower Risk of COPD

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A healthy diet might reduce the risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), new research suggests. The study was published Feb. 3 in The BMJ.

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Secondhand Smoke Exposure Down But Still Too High

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although fewer Americans are smoking and more communities have smoke-free laws, 58 million nonsmokers are still being exposed to secondhand smoke, U.S. health officials said Tuesday. Findings from the new study were published in the Feb. 3 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Fewer Than Half of Ebola Pledges Have Reached Area in Need

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Only about 40 percent of the nearly $2.9 billion in international aid pledged to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa had reached the hard-hit countries of Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone by Dec. 31, according to a report published Feb. 3 in The BMJ.

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Biomarkers Show Potential for Parkinson's Diagnosis

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have developed a blood test that they say could help neurologists detect Parkinson's disease and track the illness as it progresses. The study was published online Feb. 2 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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One in Three Prefer Earlier Death to Daily Pill

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- One out of three adults would sooner face a shorter life span than take a daily pill to prevent cardiovascular disease, according to a new Internet survey published online Feb. 3 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Flu Vaccination Rates for Nursing Home Staff Too Low

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Only about one in two U.S. nursing home workers receive an annual flu vaccination, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Infection Most Common Readmission Reason Post-Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Infections are the most likely reason people end up back in the hospital after surgery, a new study finds. The report was published in the Feb. 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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AICR: Awareness of Key Cancer Risk Factors Alarmingly Low

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer than half of Americans are aware that some major lifestyle factors can affect their cancer risk, and many people worry about cancer-causing claims that aren't backed by scientific evidence, according to a survey conducted by the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR). The survey results were released Wednesday to coincide with World Cancer Day.

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'Battlefield' Blood Transfusion Deemed More Beneficial

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A blood transfusion containing equal parts plasma, platelets, and red blood cells is the most effective treatment for someone who is in immediate danger of exsanguination, compared to a blood mix containing a larger amount of red blood cells, according to research published in the Feb. 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Review: Hormonal Rx Not Indicated As Acne Monotherapy

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hormonal therapy is recommended for treatment of acne in patients who do not respond to standard therapies, according to a review published online Jan. 27 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Tips Provided for Transitional Care Management Code Usage

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In an article published Dec. 18 in Medical Economics, information is provided on transitional care management (TCM) codes and how to implement a process to use these codes.

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Work-Related Asthma Underdiagnosed

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Only 15 percent of working adults with asthma discuss with their doctor how their jobs might affect their breathing, even though nearly half have asthma that is possibly work-related, according to a study published in the February issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. The researchers also found that doctors often don't bring up the topic with patients.

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New Guidelines Issued for Treatment of Allergic Rhinitis

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For the one in six Americans with allergic rhinitis, new treatment guidelines have been issued by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. The recommendations for those ages 2 and up appear in the February issue of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.

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Younger Patients With Diabetes More Often Skipping Visits

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- One in every five young American adults with diabetes hasn't seen a doctor in the past six months, according to a February data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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Two Pneumococcal Vaccines Advised for Seniors

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adults 65 and older need two pneumococcal vaccines to better protect them from sepsis, meningitis, and pneumonia, according to a revised vaccination schedule from the 2015 Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. The new recommendations were published in the Feb. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Nutritional Supplements Can Improve Pressure Ulcer Healing

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For malnourished adult patients, specific nutritional supplements (arginine, zinc, and antioxidants) are associated with improved pressure ulcer healing, according to a study published in the Feb. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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A Little Jogging Goes a Long Way

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A little jogging is good for your health, researchers say, but too much might not be. The findings were published in the Feb. 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Guidelines for VTE Prophylaxis, Treatment in Cancer Unchanged

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The 2014 recommendations for the prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with cancer are unchanged from 2013, according to an article published online Jan. 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Many Americans Suffering in Final Year of Life

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For a growing number of Americans, the final year of life is marked by pain, depression, and other distressing symptoms, according to a study published in the Feb. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Too Many Hospitalized Heart Failure Patients on IV Fluids

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Potentially harmful intravenous (IV) fluids are being given to too many patients with severe heart failure, according to a new study published in the Feb. 1 issue of JACC: Heart Failure.

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Non-Pharmacological Options Efficacious in Treating Delirium

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Non-pharmacological alternatives for the treatment of delirium are available and beneficial, according to a review published online Feb. 2 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Patient Engagement Can Cut Costs, Improve Outcomes

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patient engagement initiatives can decrease costs without sacrificing quality care, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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Spironolactone + TMP-SMX May Up Risk of Sudden Death

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Taking spironolactone alongside the antibiotic trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole can cause blood potassium to rise to potentially life-threatening levels, according to a study published online Feb. 2 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Medicaid Expansion Tops Savings Versus Marketplace

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medicaid expansion is associated with greater reductions in out-of-pocket spending for previously uninsured low-income adults than Marketplace exchange coverage with premium tax credits and generous benefits, according to a report published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

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Recommendations Presented for MRI Use in Multiple Myeloma

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Recommendations for the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in multiple myeloma are presented in a consensus statement published online Jan. 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Mediterranean Diet Linked to Lower Left Ventricular Mass

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Greater adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet (DT) is tied to decreased left ventricular (LV) mass, according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Incidence of Emergent Hernia Repair Up From 2001 to 2010

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 2001 to 2010 there was an increase in the incidence rates of emergent hernia repair, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in JAMA Surgery.

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Patients With Psoriasis Less Likely to Be Physically Active

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with psoriasis are less likely to engage in physical activity, especially those with more severe disease, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of Dermatology.

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