February 2015 Briefing - Emergency Medicine

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Emergency Medicine for February 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Dr. Craig Spencer Speaks Out About His Ebola Experience

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. politicians and media outlets hyped the threat of U.S. cases of Ebola last year, according to a newly written personal account by Craig Spencer, M.D., M.P.H., the last American Ebola patient treated in the United States. He also believes that officials and the media unnecessarily maligned those who were risking their lives to combat the West African epidemic.

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Use of Injected Opioid Tied to HIV Outbreak in Indiana

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Addicts' use of a powerful painkiller is driving a large HIV outbreak in Indiana, according to health officials.

Health Highlights: Feb. 26, 2015

CDC: In U.S., Half Million C. Difficile Infections in 2011

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Almost half a million Americans were infected with the bacteria Clostridium difficile in 2011, and 29,000 died within a month of diagnosis, U.S. health officials say. The report is published in the Feb. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Incidence of Viral Pneumonia Up in Young Children

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Young children are at increased risk of becoming seriously ill with pneumonia -- but unlike in years past, the cause is usually a respiratory virus, according to a study published in the Feb. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Longer Needles Recommended for Epinephrine Autoinjectors

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Given the increasing epidemic of obesity, epinephrine autoinjectors (EAIs) for anaphylaxis require longer needles to ensure intramuscular injection, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in Allergy.

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Characteristics of Tuberculosis Source Cases Identified

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In 26 U.S. tuberculosis outbreaks the initial source case-patients had long incubation periods and were characterized by substance abuse, incarceration, and homelessness, according to a study published in the March issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Disease.

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Younger Women Hesitate to Raise 'False Alarm' in MI

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Younger women may ignore early warning signs of an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), a new study reveals. The finding could help explain why younger women have higher rates of death from AMI than men in their age group. The study was published online Feb. 24 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Essential Role for Pediatricians in Care of Sexual Exploitation Victims

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatricians have a role to play in identification and treatment of victims of child sex trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC), according to a clinical report published online Feb. 23 in Pediatrics.

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CDC Investigating Newly Discovered Tick-Borne Virus

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An otherwise healthy man in Kansas became infected with a newly discovered type of virus after he was bitten by ticks, and he died of a related illness 11 days later, health official reported Friday. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention team noted that the newly identified virus is a novel member of the genus Thogotovirus, which has been linked to transmission by ticks and mosquitoes in parts of Europe, Asia, and Africa.

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Variation in Clinical Practice Guidelines for Febrile Infants

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency department clinical practice guideline (CPG) recommendations contribute to observed practice variation in febrile infants, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Noncancer Pain Patients Commonly Use Benzodiazepines

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) patients who use benzodiazepines (BZDs) daily frequently have multiple comorbid mental health conditions and higher rates of emergency health care use, according to a study published in the February issue of Pain Medicine.

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Patients Say Cost Matters Greatly in Choosing Doctor

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number one determining factor for selecting a doctor is whether the physician is in-network, according to a report published by Vitals.

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Doctors, Pharmacists Least Likely Health Pros to Divorce

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors appear less likely to get divorced than most other health care professionals, according to research published online Feb. 18 in The BMJ.

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Fear of Discrimination Keeps Many LGBT Med Students Silent

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fear of discrimination is a major reason why about one-third of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) medical students stay "in the closet," new research finds. The study was published online Feb. 16 in Academic Medicine.

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Article Emphasizes Importance of Apology in Medical Error

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Apology laws, which prohibit certain statements or expressions of sympathy by a physician from being admissible in a lawsuit, are unnecessary if physicians understand the importance of saying sorry and offering accountability after an error, according to an article published Feb. 4 in Medical Economics.

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CDC: Biggest Rise in Recent Measles Cases in Illinois

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number of measles cases in the United States has reached 141 patients in 17 states and the District of Columbia, federal health officials reported Tuesday.

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Patients Tend to Prefer Formal Physician Attire

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients often prefer physicians with formal attire and white coats, according to a systematic review published online Jan. 19 in BMJ Open.

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Electronic Beats Paper Record in Peds Trauma Resuscitations

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic documentation produces more complete records of pediatric trauma resuscitations than paper documentation, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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Latino Physician Shortage Has Worsened Since 1980

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 1980 to 2010 the Latino physician shortage worsened, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in Academic Medicine.

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Seven Tips Help Doctors Prepare for Meaningful Use Audits

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Given that physicians are chosen for meaningful use (MU) audits at random, the best way to prepare is for a physician to assume they will be audited, according to an article published Jan. 28 in Medical Economics.

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Research Misconduct ID'd by FDA Often Unreported in Literature

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A review of U.S. Food and Drug Administration inspection reports between 1998 and 2013 revealed 57 clinical trials in which regulators had uncovered violations serious enough to earn the agency's most severe classification -- "official action indicated," or OAI. The findings were published online Feb. 9 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Advantages of Shorter Resident Shifts Found Lacking

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Shorter shifts for medical residents don't appear to be making any big improvements in doctors' fatigue levels or in patient care, new research shows. The study was published online Feb. 9 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Confidence Not Accurate Measure of Prescribing Competence

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For medical students, self-reported confidence in prescribing only weakly correlates with actual competence, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Early Stroke Care Can Start With Paramedics

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- It's possible for paramedics to deliver immediate drug treatment to stroke patients, new research suggests. The study, funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), was published in the Feb. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Measles Diagnosis for Five Infants at Illinois Day Care

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number of measles cases in the United States continues to climb, with Illinois health officials saying five infants who attend a suburban Chicago day care center are infected.

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Perspective on Dr. Davidson: 'Be Like Mike'

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The tragic shooting of surgeon Michael Davidson can be used as an opportunity to find meaning in tragedy, according to a perspective piece published online Feb. 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Prehospital Magnesium Sulfate Doesn't Benefit Stroke Outcomes

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with suspected stroke, prehospital magnesium sulfate therapy is safe but does not impact the degree of disability at 90 days, according to a study published in the Feb. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Early Rehab Doesn't Increase Adverse Events Post-CABG

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Early enrollment in cardiac rehabilitation does not increase major adverse event rates among patients who recently underwent open heart surgery, according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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'Battlefield' Blood Transfusion Deemed More Beneficial

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A blood transfusion containing equal parts plasma, platelets, and red blood cells is the most effective treatment for someone who is in immediate danger of exsanguination, compared to a blood mix containing a larger amount of red blood cells, according to research published in the Feb. 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Patient Engagement Can Cut Costs, Improve Outcomes

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patient engagement initiatives can decrease costs without sacrificing quality care, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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Incidence of Emergent Hernia Repair Up From 2001 to 2010

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 2001 to 2010 there was an increase in the incidence rates of emergent hernia repair, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in JAMA Surgery.

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Medication Issues Behind One in 12 Pediatric ER Visits

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- At one Canadian children's hospital, medication-related problems accounted for one in 12 emergency department visits over a year. And about two-thirds of those incidents were preventable, the researchers concluded. The findings have been published online Feb. 2 in Pediatrics.

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