Facial Fracture Risk Up for Older Women With Facial Injury

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Facial Fracture Risk Up for Older Women With Facial Injury
Facial Fracture Risk Up for Older Women With Facial Injury

MONDAY, July 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of facial fracture varies with age, sex, and race, with increased risk among white and Asian older women, according to research published online July 14 in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.

Curtis Hanba, from the Wayne State University School of Medicine in Detroit, and colleagues characterized the incidence of facial fractures by patient demographics and injury mechanism in a retrospective analysis of the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). There were 33,825 NEISS entries corresponding to 1,401,196 emergency department visits for adult facial injury; of these, 14.4 percent involved fracture.

The researchers found that among younger individuals (<60 years), a greater proportion of facial injuries were fractures among men than women (15.5 versus 12.5 percent; P < 0.001). In older populations (≥60 years), women had an increased fracture predilection (15.0 versus 14.0 percent; P < 0.001). Older women had a significantly greater fracture risk than younger women, with the comparison significant among whites and Asians; older black women had a significantly decreased fracture risk. Compared with blacks, white and Asian individuals of either sex had significantly greater rates of facial fracture injury on individual comparisons of younger and older cohorts.

"There is an increase in the risk of facial fracture among postmenopausal women sustaining facial injuries, with these results significant among whites and Asians," the authors write. "A decreased risk was noted on comparison of younger and older black women."

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