Exercise Dose, Intensity Don't Impact Reduction in Liver Fat

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Exercise Dose, Intensity Don't Impact Reduction in Liver Fat
Exercise Dose, Intensity Don't Impact Reduction in Liver Fat

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Reductions in liver fat or visceral adipose tissue (VAT) do not differ significantly with the dose or intensity of aerobic exercise, according to a study published online April 8 in the Journal of Hepatology.

Shelley E. Keating, from the University of Sydney, and colleagues examined the efficacy of commonly prescribed exercise doses for reducing liver fat and VAT. Forty-seven inactive and overweight/obese adults were randomized to receive eight weeks of low- to moderate-intensity, high-volume aerobic exercise (LO:HI); high-intensity, low-volume aerobic exercise (HI:LO); low- to moderate-intensity, low-volume aerobic exercise (LO:LO); or placebo.

The researchers observed a significant change in group × time interaction in liver fat, with reductions of 2.38 percent in HI:LO, 2.62 percent in LO:HI, and 0.84 percent in LO:LO and an increase of 1.1 percent in placebo. There were significant reductions in VAT in the HI:LO, LO:HI, and LO:LO groups but not in placebo. No significant differences were seen between the dose or intensity of the exercise regimen and the deceases in liver fat or VAT.

"All of the aerobic exercise regimens employed reduced liver fat and VAT by a small amount without clinically significant weight loss," the authors write.

Two authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

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