Economic Impact of Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Injury Measured

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Economic Impact of Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Injury Measured
Economic Impact of Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Injury Measured

WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The management of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury has a considerable economic impact, according to a study published online June 5 in Head & Neck.

Cesare Carlo Ferrari, M.D., from the University of Insubria in Varese, Italy, and colleagues examined resource consumption in the management of patients with RLN injury versus non-injured patients. Three perspectives (patient, national health system [NHS], and society) were examined in five clinical pathways.

The researchers found that the direct medical costs supported by the NHS varied from €79.46 to €3,261.95. From the perspective of the patient, the direct medical costs increased from €3.60 to €499.45. Per patient, productivity losses were €156 per day. Considering the minimum and maximum values related to direct costs associated with the NHS and patient for each clinical pathway, the percentage varied from 43.25 to 98.14 percent and from 51.52 to 80.60 percent, respectively.

"The analysis shows a significant economic impact of RLN injury management, which varies depending on the damage, duration, and severity," the authors write.

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