Early Mortality for Most Infants With Trisomy 13, 18

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Early Mortality for Most Infants With Trisomy 13, 18
Early Mortality for Most Infants With Trisomy 13, 18

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Early mortality is the most common outcome among children born with trisomy 13 or 18, although one-year survival is high for those undergoing surgical procedures, according to a study published online July 26 in The Journal of the American Medical Association.

Katherine E. Nelson, M.D., from the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, and colleagues conducted a retrospective cohort study to identify children born in Ontario from April 1, 1991, through March 31, 2012, with a diagnosis code for trisomy 13 or 18. Data were included for 174 children with trisomy 13 and 254 with trisomy 18, with follow-up times of 0 to more than 7,000 days.

The researchers found that the median survival times were 12.5 and nine days, respectively, for trisomy 13 and 18. Mean one-year survival was 19.8 and 12.6 percent, respectively, for trisomy 13 and 18; 10-year survival was 12.9 and 9.8 percent, respectively. Over the study period there was no change in survival. Surgeries were conducted in 23.6 percent of children with trisomy 13 and 13.8 percent with trisomy 18, with surgeries ranging from myringotomy to complex cardiac repair. One-year survival after first surgery was 70.7 and 68.6 percent, respectively, for trisomy 13 and 18.

"Among children born with trisomy 13 or 18 in Ontario, early mortality was the most common outcome, but 10 percent to 13 percent survived for 10 years," the authors write.

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