Doctors Urged to Check Patient Drug History Before Opioid Rx

Share this content:
Doctors Urged to Check Patient Drug History Before Opioid Rx
Doctors Urged to Check Patient Drug History Before Opioid Rx

WEDNESDAY, May 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Prescription databases can help combat drug abuse when doctors are required by law to check them before writing opioid prescriptions, according to a study to be published in a future issue of the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy.

The researchers found that states that enforced a "must access" policy for prescription drug databases saw a drop in the number of Medicare recipients who got more than a seven-month supply of opioid medication in just six months. Also, fewer people filled a prescription before their previous supply ran out.

The investigators also found that the number of Medicare opioid users who received prescriptions from five or more doctors dropped by 8 percent in those states. The number of people who got opioids from five or more pharmacies fell by more than 15 percent. The effects of prescription database regulations were most notable in states with the strictest laws, including New York. New York requires doctors to check the opioid history of "every patient, every time," the researchers said. But even less stringent state laws reduced doctor-shopping.

"The main issue is getting providers to change their prescribing behavior," study coauthor Colleen Carey, Ph.D., an assistant professor of policy analysis and management at Cornell University's College of Human Ecology in Ithaca, N.Y., said in a university news release. "The majority of opioids that people abuse start in the medical system as a legitimate prescription."

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »


Sign up for myCME e-newsletters


Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

NTproBNP Levels Are Significantly Lower in Blacks

NTproBNP Levels Are Significantly Lower in Blacks

Higher NTproBNP levels linked to increased risk of death; this association did not differ by race

Data May Weigh on Pros/Cons of Expanded Care Optometry

Data May Weigh on Pros/Cons of Expanded Care ...

Majority of residents in Kentucky, Oklahoma, New Mexico live within 30 minutes of ophthalmologist

Gaps Seen Between Hearing Loss, Receipt of Medical Evaluation, Tx

Gaps Seen Between Hearing Loss, Receipt of Medical ...

About 20.6 percent of those with hearing less than excellent/good had visited doctor for hearing issues

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »