Dietary Glycemic Index Linked to Lung Cancer Risk

This article originally appeared here.
Share this content:
Dietary Glycemic Index Linked to Lung Cancer Risk
Dietary Glycemic Index Linked to Lung Cancer Risk

MONDAY, March 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary glycemic index (GI) is associated with lung cancer risk, according to a study published in the March issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Stephanie C. Melkonian, Ph.D., from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, and colleagues assessed glycemic load (GL) and GI among 1,905 newly diagnosed lung cancer cases and 2,413 healthy controls. The correlations between quintiles of GI/GL and lung cancer risk were assessed.

The researchers observed a significant correlation between GI and lung cancer risk (fifth versus first quintile, odds ratio, 1.49; Ptrend < 0.001). There was also a significant correlation between total GI using total available carbohydrate and lung cancer risk (fifth versus first quintile, odds ratio, 1.48; Ptrend = 0.001). The correlations for GI and lung cancer risk were more pronounced among never smokers (odds ratio, 2.25), for squamous cell carcinoma (odds ratio, 1.92), and for those with less than 12 years of education (odds ratio, 1.75).

"Understanding the role of GI in lung cancer could inform prevention strategies and elucidate biologic pathways related to lung cancer risk," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »


Sign up for myCME e-newsletters


Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease


More in Home

FDA Approves 'Artificial Pancreas' for Type 1 Diabetes

FDA Approves 'Artificial Pancreas' for Type 1 Diabetes

MiniMed 670G hybrid closed loop system automatically monitors glucose, delivers insulin

More Evidence HPV Vaccine Protects Against Cervical Cancer

More Evidence HPV Vaccine Protects Against Cervical Cancer

Protection appears to occur even when only one or two of the recommended doses are given

Prescribed NSAIDs Tied to Higher Heart Failure Risk

Prescribed NSAIDs Tied to Higher Heart Failure Risk

Study of millions of health records suggests an association

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »