December 2014 Briefing - Psychiatry

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for December 2014. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

AMA Identifies Top 10 Issues That Affected Docs in 2014

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The top 10 issues that affected physicians in 2014 include many regulatory issues relating to Medicare and data release, as well as health issues such as overprescribing of antibiotics and the Ebola crisis, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Serotonin1A Binding Linked to Suicide Attempt Lethality

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For suicide attempters with major depressive disorder (MDD), serotonin1A binding potential in the raphe nuclei is correlated with lethality rating and lethal intent factor, according to a study published online Dec. 30 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Binge Alcohol Ingestion Has Acute Immunomodulatory Effects

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A single binge alcohol intoxication episode has acute immunomodulatory effects, according to a study published online Dec. 4 in Alcohol.

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Ebola, ACA, VA Scandal Top U.S. Health News for 2014

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- It started as a deadly but little-known outbreak in West Africa, but the lethal and unchecked spread of the Ebola virus dominated U.S. headlines for much of 2014, making it one of the year's top health news features.

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Pre-Op Depression Tied to Fewer Gains in QOL After Spinal Surgery

TUESDAY, Dec. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing lumbar decompression or posterior cervical fusion (PCF), preoperative depression is associated with lower improvements in postoperative quality of life (QOL), according to two studies published in the Jan. 1 issue of The Spine Journal.

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Hepatitis C Co-Infection in HIV Doesn't Worsen Mental Decline

MONDAY, Dec. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Hepatitis C infection does not contribute to neurocognitive impairment in people with HIV, according to a new study published online Dec. 10 in Neurology.

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Brain Variations on MRI May Predict Surgical Success in OCD

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors may be able to identify candidates for dorsal anterior cingulotomy for refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) by looking at a key structure in the targeted brain region. These research findings have been published online Dec. 23 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Older Women Restrict Driving More Than Older Men

MONDAY, Dec. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Older women restrict their driving activity more than older men, regardless of physical health or cognitive status, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Tips Offered to Docs, Spouses for Maintaining Happy Marriage

FRIDAY, Dec. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Simple tips can help physicians and their spouses maintain marital happiness, according to an article published in the American Medical Association (AMA) Alliance magazine Physician Family.

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Sedatives Still Prescribed for Elderly Despite Risks

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors continue to prescribe benzodiazepines for seniors despite the significant risks they pose, a new study contends. The research was published online Dec. 17 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Digital Self-Scheduling Set to Increase Considerably by 2019

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Digital self-scheduling is set to increase considerably in the next five years, according to a report published by Accenture.

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Challenges ID'd in Development of the Physician Compare Website

TUESDAY, Dec. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), information must be made available to allow the public to compare physicians, although there are considerable challenges surrounding the development of the physician performance website, Physician Compare. These challenges are addressed in a health policy brief published online Dec. 11 in Health Affairs.

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Support for Electronic Health Information Varies With Use

TUESDAY, Dec. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Consent and purpose are important for public support of secondary uses of electronic health information, according to a study published in the Dec. 16 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Physicians Reminded of Ethical Obligations Regarding Torture

TUESDAY, Dec. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- With the issuing of the new U.S. Senate report on interrogations, the American Medical Association (AMA) is reminding physicians of their ethical obligations relating to torture and interrogation.

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Methylphenidate Use Tied to Fewer Injuries in Kids With ADHD

MONDAY, Dec. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Taking medication for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) might reduce the risk of young patients accidentally injuring themselves, new research suggests. The findings, published online Dec. 15 in Pediatrics, applied to both girls and boys.

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Physicians Should Scrutinize Job Offers Before Accepting

MONDAY, Dec. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians should scrutinize job offers and pay attention to specific issues before accepting a job, according to an article published Dec. 3 in Medical Economics.

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Webcast Scheduled to Discuss Maintenance of Certification

MONDAY, Dec. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- New data relating to Maintenance of Certification (MOC) will be discussed in a free webcast to be held Dec. 17 by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

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ICU Diaries May Aid Survivors in Recovery After Discharge

MONDAY, Dec. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Patient diaries kept during a hospital stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) for a critical illness may be used as a therapeutic tool to assist survivors in recovery after discharge, according to research published online Dec. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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In Nursing Homes, Statins Often Continued in Advanced Dementia

MONDAY, Dec. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For nursing home (NH) residents with dementia taking statins, most continue statins with the progression to advanced dementia, according to research published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Tips Offered for Docs to Manage Their Online Reputation

FRIDAY, Dec. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians can manage their online reputation, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

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FDA: Ziprasidone Can Cause Rare, Serious Adverse Drug Reaction

FRIDAY, Dec. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The antipsychotic medicine ziprasidone (Geodon) and generic versions of the drug can cause a rare, serious skin reaction that can progress to affect other parts of the body, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

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More Students Enrolling in U.S. Medical Schools

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- More students are enrolling in medical schools, and enrollees are more diverse than before, according to a report from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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More Docs, Patients Not Speaking Same Language

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- People applying to become medical residents in the United States speak a wide range of non-English languages, but many aren't the languages spoken by patients with limited English skills, according to a research letter published in the Dec. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on medical education.

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Docs Trained in High-Cost Areas Practice More Costly Medicine

TUESDAY, Dec. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors who were trained in high-cost areas of the United States may be more likely to practice expensive medicine, a new study suggests; however, that effect gradually decreases over time. The study was published in the Dec. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on medical education.

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Work-Hour Restrictions Have Not Improved Outcomes

TUESDAY, Dec. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing medical residents' work hours hasn't improved mortality rates, hospital readmission rates, or outcomes of surgery, according to two new studies published in the Dec. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on medical education.

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Depression, Anxiety Tied to T-Wave Abnormalities

TUESDAY, Dec. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Depression and anxiety are independently, yet oppositely, associated with electrocardiographic (ECG) T-wave inversions, according to a study published in the Dec. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Peer Education Helpful for Diabetes Patients in Distress

FRIDAY, Dec. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Peer education improves mental status in type 2 diabetes patients who have emotional disorders, according to research published online Nov. 16 in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation.

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AMA: Social Determinants of Health to Be Taught in Med School

THURSDAY, Dec. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A new policy implemented by the American Medical Association (AMA) supports integrating more training on the social determinants of health into undergraduate medical education, according to a report published by the AMA.

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Antidepressant Effect Seen for Anti-Inflammatory Meds

THURSDAY, Dec. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Anti-inflammatory agents may decrease depression and depressive symptoms, according to research published in the December issue of JAMA Psychiatry.

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First-Episode Schizophrenia Care Needs Improvement

THURSDAY, Dec. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Improper drug treatment is given to nearly 40 percent of people who suffer their first episode of schizophrenia, according to a new study published online Dec. 4 in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Running Linked With Lower Alzheimer's Death Risk

THURSDAY, Dec. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Running more than 15 miles a week may reduce the risk of dying from Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests. The study was published online Nov. 14 in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

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Cognitive Behavioral Tx for Insomnia Assists CA Survivors

THURSDAY, Dec. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For cancer survivors, cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) with and without armodafinil is associated with decreases in insomnia severity and improvements in sleep quality, according to a study published online Dec. 1 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Bidirectional Link Between Physical Activity and Depression

THURSDAY, Dec. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Physical activity is associated with a trend toward fewer depressive symptoms, and the correlation is bidirectional, according to research published in the December issue of JAMA Psychiatry.

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CDC: Nearly 1 in 12 Americans Struggle With Depression

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 8 percent of Americans aged 12 and older experienced moderate to severe symptoms of depression during 2009 to 2012, U.S. health officials reported Wednesday, with only about one-third of those suffering from severe depressive symptoms seeking help from a mental health professional in the previous year.

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Too Much Patient Care Tied to Faculty Members' Intent to Leave

TUESDAY, Dec. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Spending "far too much/too much" time/effort on patient care is associated with increased intent to leave the institution, according to research published in Academic Medicine.

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Midlife Diabetes Linked to Greater Cogntive Decline Later

TUESDAY, Dec. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes in midlife is associated with a greater decline in cognitive skills over 20 years, according to a new study published in the Dec. 2 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Doctor Discusses Ways to Keep Morale in Medicine High

MONDAY, Dec. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the many frustrations for doctors in medical practice, there are ways to keep morale high, according to an article published Nov. 20 in Medical Economics.

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Most People With Dementia Have Not Been Screened

MONDAY, Dec. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of Americans with dementia have never undergone screening of their cognitive function, according to a new study published online Nov. 26 in Neurology.

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Many Physicians Report Their Incomes Have Plateaued

MONDAY, Dec. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Many physicians report that their personal income has not changed since last year, according to the results of the Physicians Practice 2014 Physicians Compensation Survey.

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Prevalence of Psych Comorbidity Down After Detention

MONDAY, Dec. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For youth, the prevalence rates of psychiatric comorbidity decrease after detention; however, rates remain substantial and those with multiple disorders at baseline are at highest risk of disorders five years after detention, according to a study published online Nov. 26 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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