Cellulitis Often Misdiagnosed in Inpatient Setting

This article originally appeared here.
Share this content:
Cellulitis Often Misdiagnosed in Inpatient Setting
Cellulitis Often Misdiagnosed in Inpatient Setting

(HealthDay News) -- Cellulitis is frequently misdiagnosed in the inpatient setting, according to research published in the July issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Lauren Strazzula, M.D., from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and colleagues examined the national incidence of cellulitis misdiagnosis among inpatients. Data were reviewed from 1,430 inpatient dermatology consultations from four medical centers, conducted in 2008.

The researchers found that 5.17 percent of inpatient dermatology consultations were requested for the assessment of cellulitis. Almost three-quarters (74.32 percent) of those evaluated for cellulitis were diagnosed with pseudocellulitis. The rate of misdiagnosis did not vary significantly across institutions (P = 0.12). There was no significant difference noted in patient demographics and associated risk factor prevalence for those given a diagnosis of cellulitis versus pseudocellulitis (P > 0.05).

"This study demonstrates that an inpatient dermatology consultation for patients admitted with cellulitis improves diagnostic accuracy, and in turn, may be a cost-effective strategy that decreases unnecessary hospitalization and improves patient care," the authors write. "This research highlights the need for more comprehensive training in the diagnosis and management of dermatologic disease in undergraduate and graduate medical education."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease



Sign up for myCME e-newsletters




More in Home

Florida Teen First Human Case of Another Mosquito-Borne Virus

Florida Teen First Human Case of Another Mosquito-Borne ...

First documented case of Keystone infection in a human

70 Sickened So Far in Salmonella-Tainted Melon Outbreak

70 Sickened So Far in Salmonella-Tainted Melon Outbreak

Illnesses reported in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio, and Tennessee

AAFP Still Recommends CRC Screening From Age 50 to 75

AAFP Still Recommends CRC Screening From Age 50 ...

Despite ACS change to start screening from age 45 years, AAFP agrees with USPSTF recommendation

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »