BRAF Inhibitors May Accelerate Wound Healing

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BRAF Inhibitors May Accelerate Wound Healing
BRAF Inhibitors May Accelerate Wound Healing

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Topical application of BRAF inhibitors may accelerate healing of skin wounds, according to a study published online Aug. 1 in Nature Communications.

Helena Escuin-Ordinas, Ph.D., from the University of California in Los Angeles, and colleagues examined how the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib accelerates skin wound healing in two wound-healing mice models.

The researchers found that topical treatment with vemurafenib accelerated wound healing through paradoxical mitogen-activated protein kinase activation; the benefit of vemurafenib-accelerated wound healing was reversed by additional of a MEK inhibitor. The same dosing regimen of topical BRAF inhibitor did not increase cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma incidence in mice.

"Topical BRAF inhibitors may have clinical applications in accelerating the healing of skin wounds," the authors write.

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