August 2017 Briefing - Allergy

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Allergy for August 2017. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Minimal Evidence for Electronic Communication Guidelines

THURSDAY, Aug. 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Minimal evidence is available for guidelines for electronic communication between patients and providers, according to research published online Aug. 28 in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.

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Local Allergic Rhinitis Often Progresses Over Time

THURSDAY, Aug. 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with local allergic rhinitis (LAR) show worsening of rhinitis, greater tendency toward development of asthma, and impairment of quality of life after 10 years, but have a similar rate of development of allergic rhinitis with systemic atopy as controls, according to research published online Aug. 22 in Allergy.

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Proactive Approach Encouraged for Online Patient Reviews

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Most patients are using online reviews as a first step to finding a new doctor, with 65 percent forming an opinion from reading one to six reviews, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Many Parents Aren't Divulging CAM Use to Child's Provider

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Parents often try complementary treatments when their children are ill, but many don't tell their pediatricians about it, according to a report published online Aug. 28 in Pediatrics.

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Low Rate of Recurrence Seen for Serious Reactions to Vaccines

TUESDAY, Aug. 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Severe vaccine reactions recur rarely, if ever, when a child receives the same vaccine again, or one with similar ingredients, according to a review published online Aug. 28 in Pediatrics.

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Increases in IgE, Eosinophils, Mast Cells Can ID IgG4-RD

MONDAY, Aug. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Most patients with immunoglobulin G subclass 4-related disease (IgG4-RD) have increased levels of IgE, eosinophils, and mast cells, according to research published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Asthma Tied to Later Inflammatory Bowel Disease

FRIDAY, Aug. 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Asthma is associated with subsequent development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to a study published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Patient Beliefs May Explain High Rate of Medicine Intake

THURSDAY, Aug. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Subjective norms and attitudes toward medicine consumption predict the intention and expectation to consume medicines, according to a study published online Aug. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

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Nurse-, System-Related Factors Analyzed in Wrong-Patient Events

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Greater focus is needed on correct identification processes in order to prevent wrong-patient medication administration incidents, and system supports for nurses are critical, according to a study published online Aug. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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Hours Worked Impacted by Kids for Female, Not Male Doctors

MONDAY, Aug. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For women, but not men, in dual-physician couples, weekly hours worked are lower for those with versus those without children, according to a research letter published online Aug. 21 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Studies Used for FDA Approval of Device Changes Often Low Quality

TUESDAY, Aug. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many studies used to support U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of high-risk medical device modifications are not controlled; and efficacy of drugs granted accelerated approval is often confirmed three years after approval, according to two studies published in the Aug. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Specialist Access No Better With Adoption of Access Standards

TUESDAY, Aug. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Adoption of specialty access standards does not improve access to specialists, according to a study published online Aug. 14 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Probiotics in Infancy Do Not Reduce Incidence of Eczema

TUESDAY, Aug. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Probiotic administration during the first six months of life does not reduce the incidence of eczema at 2 years of age or asthma at 5 years of age, according to a study published online Aug. 7 in Pediatrics.

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Guidance Provided for Preventing Practice Billing Errors

MONDAY, Aug. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Strategies can help to prevent medical practice billing errors, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Epigenetic Markers Correlate With Allergic Rhinitis Severity

FRIDAY, Aug. 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Participants with grass pollen-induced allergic rhinitis undergo epigenetic changes within three hours of exposure to grass pollen, according to a study published online July 29 in Allergy.

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Signature ID'd for Allergen-Specific Type 2 Helper Cells

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- In research published in the Aug. 2 issue of Science Translational Medicine, scientists have identified a human type 2 helper (TH2) cell signature in allergen-specific TH2 cells.

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Revenue Exceeds Expenditures for Many ABMS Member Boards

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Overall revenue exceeds expenditures for many American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) member boards, according to a study published in the Aug. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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