August 2015 Briefing - Psychiatry

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for August 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

AAP: In Office Visits, Ask Every Adolescent About Alcohol Use

MONDAY, Aug. 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol poses a far greater threat to children than many parents may realize, according to a clinical report published online Aug. 31 in Pediatrics.

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Multidisciplinary Rehab Tops CBT for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

MONDAY, Aug. 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), multidisciplinary rehabilitation treatment (MRT) is more effective for reducing fatigue than cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), according to a study published online Aug. 26 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Psychological Features Impact Myofascial Paraspinous Pain Tx

FRIDAY, Aug. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic myofascial paraspinous pain, psychological characteristics, especially anxiety, influence response to interventional pain management, according to a study published online Aug. 26 in Pain Medicine.

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AMA: Ruling Makes It Easier for Insurers to Terminate Doctors

FRIDAY, Aug. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The outcome of a recent case regarding the termination of physicians by an insurance company following a dispute over the necessity of medical services provided has serious implications for physicians and their patients, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Challenges in Replicating Results of Psychology Studies

FRIDAY, Aug. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Independent researchers couldn't reproduce the findings of more than half of 100 experiments previously published in three prominent psychology journals, according to a review published in the Aug. 28 issue of Science.

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Most Women Feel Distress With False-Positive Mammogram

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of women who receive false positives on mammography experience distress and anxiety, according to research published online Aug. 26 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Mixed Results for Cannabis Effect on Developing Brain

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The potential effect of cannabis on brain structure remains a subject of intense scientific scrutiny, but mixed results have emerged from two of the latest studies on the topic. Both studies were published online Aug. 26 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Alterations in Topological Architecture of Brain in PTSD

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) exhibit alterations in the topological architecture of the brain, according to a study published in the September issue of Radiology.

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Anorexia Resurgence Can Occur After Smoking Cessation

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking cessation may be associated with resurgence of anorexic symptoms in patients with a history of anorexia nervosa, according to a clinical case report published in the September issue of the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

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Exercise, Supplements Don't Help Preserve Cognition in Elderly

TUESDAY, Aug. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Neither exercise nor supplements such as omega-3 fatty acids seem to preserve cognitive function in the elderly, according to research published in the Aug. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Preterm Birth, Poor Fetal Growth Tied to ADHD Risk

TUESDAY, Aug. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Risks of attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are greatest for children with the most severe degree of poor growth in the womb, according to research published online Aug. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Too Few Blacks, Hispanics Pursuing Careers As Physicians

TUESDAY, Aug. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Too few members of certain minority groups are pursuing careers in U.S. medicine, resulting in a serious lack of diversity among general practitioners and specialists, according to a research letter published online Aug. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Good Moods Infectious Among Teens, Depression Is Not

FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A good mood is infectious among teens, but depression is not, a new study suggests. The findings were published online Aug. 19 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

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Spouses of Stroke Survivors Report Reduced Quality of Life

FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Caring for a spouse who has had a stroke can harm both mental and physical health, according to research published online Aug. 20 in Stroke.

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Nine Modifiable Factors May Be Key in Reducing Alzheimer's Risk

FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Up to two-thirds of Alzheimer's cases worldwide may stem from any of nine conditions that often result from lifestyle choices, a broad research review suggests. The findings were published online Aug. 20 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

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Bulimia Nervosa Tied to Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Binge eating disorder (BED) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are associated with increased incidence and prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D), according to a study published in the September issue of the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

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APA: Video Games Linked to Aggression but Not Violence

THURSDAY, Aug. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There is a link between violent video games and higher levels of aggression in players; however, there isn't enough evidence to prove that playing violent video games raises the risk of criminal behavior or violence, according to a report from the American Psychological Association's (APA) Task Force on Violent Media.

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Report Highlights Ways to Improve Physician Resilience

THURSDAY, Aug. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Strategies can be adopted for improving physician resilience and the ability to handle the challenges presented by patient care, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Well-Being of Kids From Military Families Suffers During Wartime

TUESDAY, Aug. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Military-connected youth are at increased risk for adverse outcomes during wartime, indicating poorer socioemotional adjustment than their nonmilitary peers, according to a study published online Aug. 17 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Federal Grants Target Heroin Epidemic in Eastern States

TUESDAY, Aug. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Obama administration will provide millions of dollars in federal grants to help counties hardest hit by a heroin epidemic in the eastern United States.

Health Highlights: Aug 17, 2015

New York Latest State to Ban Powdered Alcohol

MONDAY, Aug. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New York is the latest state to ban powdered alcohol, even though it isn't even available on the open market yet.

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Early Life Adversity Linked to Brain Changes in Adolescent Boys

MONDAY, Aug. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Early life adversity correlates with higher levels of internalizing symptoms and with altered brain structure, according to a study published online Aug. 17 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Physical Activity Reduces Risk of Mental Health Sick Leave

FRIDAY, Aug. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of job stress may increase the risk of sick leave due to mental health disorders, but risk is decreased with increasing physical activity, according to research published in the August issue of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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Playing Football at Younger Age May Disrupt Brain Development

FRIDAY, Aug. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For former professional football players, earlier age of first exposure (AFE) to repetitive head impacts (RHI) correlates with later-life altered corpus callosum (CC) microstructure, according to a study published online July 22 in the Journal of Neurotrauma.

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Review: Music Beneficial During Postoperative Period

THURSDAY, Aug. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing surgical procedures, music is associated with reductions in postoperative pain, anxiety, and analgesia use, according to a review published online Aug. 12 in The Lancet.

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More Physicians Reporting Dissatisfaction With EHR Systems

THURSDAY, Aug. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More physicians report being dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with their electronic health record (EHR) system, compared with five years ago, according to a report published by the AmericanEHR Partners and the American Medical Association.

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Exposure to Rude Behavior Harms NICU Team Performance

THURSDAY, Aug. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to rudeness has adverse consequences on the diagnostic and procedural performance of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) team members, according to a study published online Aug. 10 in Pediatrics.

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Diet High in Refined Carbs Could Increase Depression Risk

THURSDAY, Aug. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- High-glycemic-index (GI) diets could increase the risk of depression in postmenopausal women, according to a study published in the August issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Thalamic Dysconnectivity Seen in Those at Risk for Psychosis

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Among individuals at clinical high risk for psychosis, thalamic dysconnectivity is evident, according to a study published online Aug. 12 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Case Report Describes Benefit of Ketamine in Child With PTSD

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Ketamine may be beneficial for children with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and episodes of severe aggression and emotional dysregulation, according to a case report published online Aug. 10 in Pediatrics.

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Cholinesterase Inhibitors Pose Weight-Loss Risk

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors with dementia newly prescribed cholinesterase inhibitors are at risk for significant weight loss, according to a study published online Aug. 3 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Partial Reinforcement Strategy Feasible for Chronic Insomnia

TUESDAY, Aug. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A partial reinforcement strategy with 10 mg zolpidem seems to be effective for maintenance therapy for chronic insomnia, according to a study published online July 7 in Sleep Medicine.

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HAC Reduction Program Penalty Kicks in for FY2015

TUESDAY, Aug. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The latest Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) effort to reduce hospital-acquired conditions (HACs) is the HAC Reduction Program, according to an Aug. 6 health policy brief published in Health Affairs.

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In-Person Staff Meetings Are Valuable for Health Care Teams

MONDAY, Aug. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In-person staff meetings, which are not too short or too long and are held frequently, are valuable for health care team operation, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Religion, Spirituality May Enhance Health in Cancer Patients

MONDAY, Aug. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For cancer patients, religion and spirituality (R/S) measures are associated with measures of physical, mental, and social health outcomes, according to three reviews published online Aug. 10 in Cancer.

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E-Interventions Lack Sustained Efficacy in Alcohol Misuse

FRIDAY, Aug. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Web-based or CD programs could reduce drinking slightly among adults and college students in the short term, but they appear to be ineffective for reducing binge drinking and the negative social aspects linked with alcohol misuse. The findings were published in the Aug. 4 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Many Hospitals Being Penalized for 30-Day Readmissions

FRIDAY, Aug. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About half of the nation's hospitals are being penalized by Medicare for having patients return within a month of discharge, losing a combined $420 million, according to a report published by Kaiser Health.

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Reduced Executive Function May Mean Higher CVD Risk

THURSDAY, Aug. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults with lower scores on executive function tests are significantly more likely to experience coronary heart disease or stroke, new research suggests. The study was published online Aug. 5 in Neurology.

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Phone-Delivered CBT Beneficial for Seniors With Anxiety

THURSDAY, Aug. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A telephone-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention is superior to nondirective supportive therapy (NST) for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), according to a study published online Aug. 5 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Sleeping on Side May Be More Efficient for 'Clearing Brain'

THURSDAY, Aug. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Removal of waste, including soluble amyloid β (Aβ), from the brain may be most efficient in the lateral versus the prone position, according to an experimental study published in the Aug. 5 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

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More Social Media Use Linked to Mental Health Concerns in Teens

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who frequently use social media are more likely to say they struggle with mental health concerns that are not being addressed, according to research published in the July issue of Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking.

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Progress in Reducing U.S. Rates of Violence

TUESDAY, Aug. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Violent crime rates have decreased dramatically over the past three decades, largely due to crime prevention efforts that focus on the root causes of violence, researchers say. Findings from the study are published in the Aug. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on violence and human rights.

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Mindfulness Therapy Beneficial for PTSD Symptoms in Veterans

TUESDAY, Aug. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Mindfulness therapy appears to help veterans cope with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a new study suggests. The report was published in the Aug. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on violence and human rights.

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USPSTF Finds Evidence Lacking for Autism Screening in Children

TUESDAY, Aug. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has concluded that there is currently insufficient evidence to assess the benefits and harms of screening for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in asymptomatic children age 3 and younger. These findings form the basis of a draft recommendation statement published online Aug. 3 by the USPSTF.

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