August 2015 Briefing - Gastroenterology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for August 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

AMA: Ruling Makes It Easier for Insurers to Terminate Doctors

FRIDAY, Aug. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The outcome of a recent case regarding the termination of physicians by an insurance company following a dispute over the necessity of medical services provided has serious implications for physicians and their patients, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Takayasu Arteritis, Ulcerative Colitis Co-Occurrence Rate High

FRIDAY, Aug. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Takayasu arteritis (TAK) has a high rate of co-occurrence and genetic overlap with ulcerative colitis (UC), according to a study published in the August issue of Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Lower Risk of Dabigatran-Tied Bleeding With Gastroprotection

FRIDAY, Aug. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients taking dabigatran, the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) is reduced with use of gastroprotective agents, according to a study published in the September issue of Gastroenterology.

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Cirrhosis in Hepatitis C More Widespread Than Thought

THURSDAY, Aug. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Severe liver damage may be four times more common among Americans with hepatitis C than previously believed, according to study findings published in the August issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

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Longer Colonoscopy Withdrawal Time May Cut Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Aug. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Longer colonoscopy withdrawal time is associated with lower risk for colorectal cancer over five years, according to a study published online recently in Gastroenterology.

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Many With Nonceliac Wheat Sensitivity Have Autoimmune Dz

THURSDAY, Aug. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More patients with nonceliac wheat sensitivity (NCWS) and celiac disease (CD) than irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) develop autoimmune diseases (ADs), according to a study published in the September issue of Gastroenterology.

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Antiviral Rx May Help Prevent Ebola, Small Study Suggests

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Antiviral drugs may help protect people from developing Ebola after exposure to the virus, a new case study suggests. The results were published online Aug. 25 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Low-Dose Aspirin, Other NSAIDs May Lower Colorectal Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, Aug. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Regularly taking low-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may lower long-term risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), new research suggests. The study was published online Aug. 25 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Too Few Blacks, Hispanics Pursuing Careers As Physicians

TUESDAY, Aug. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Too few members of certain minority groups are pursuing careers in U.S. medicine, resulting in a serious lack of diversity among general practitioners and specialists, according to a research letter published online Aug. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Weight Loss Benefits NASH, No Matter How It's Done

MONDAY, Aug. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Weight loss can improve nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in obese or overweight people, whether excess pounds are shed through lifestyle changes or weight-loss surgery, according to research published in the August issue of Gastroenterology.

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Patient, Family Advisors Can Play Key Role in Practices

FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Practices can employ patient and family advisors in order to help them focus on patient-centered care needs, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Significant Rise in Organic Food Recalls in the United States

FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a sharp rise in recalls of organic food products in the United States this year, according to a new report.

Health Highlights: Aug 20, 2015

Report Highlights Ways to Improve Physician Resilience

THURSDAY, Aug. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Strategies can be adopted for improving physician resilience and the ability to handle the challenges presented by patient care, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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FDA Reveals More Violations by Medical Scope Maker

TUESDAY, Aug. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New violations by the maker of medical scopes recently linked to deadly infections in patients have been discovered by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Health Highlights: Aug 18, 2015

Drinking Coffee May Cut Risk of Death in Stage III Colon Cancer

TUESDAY, Aug. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Total coffee intake is associated with colon cancer recurrence and mortality for patients with stage III disease, according to a study published online Aug. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Antigen Level Signals Response to Chemo for Pancreatic Cancer

MONDAY, Aug. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A drop in carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 levels of more than 10 percent after two rounds of chemotherapy is associated with longer survival in patients with advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), according to a study published online Aug. 6 in the Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Child CA Survivors Face Risk of Bowel Obstruction Requiring Sx

FRIDAY, Aug. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Survivors of childhood cancer have an increased long-term risk of intestinal obstruction requiring surgery (IOS), according to a study published online Aug. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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More Physicians Reporting Dissatisfaction With EHR Systems

THURSDAY, Aug. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More physicians report being dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with their electronic health record (EHR) system, compared with five years ago, according to a report published by the AmericanEHR Partners and the American Medical Association.

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Migration Contributes to Flat HBV Infection Prevalence Rate in U.S.

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has remained constant since 1999, according to a study published online Aug. 6 in Hepatology.

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Index Stratifies Risk for Advanced Colorectal Neoplasia

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A scoring system can stratify risk for advanced colorectal neoplasia in asymptomatic adults, according to a study published online Aug. 11 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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HAC Reduction Program Penalty Kicks in for FY2015

TUESDAY, Aug. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The latest Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) effort to reduce hospital-acquired conditions (HACs) is the HAC Reduction Program, according to an Aug. 6 health policy brief published in Health Affairs.

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In-Person Staff Meetings Are Valuable for Health Care Teams

MONDAY, Aug. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In-person staff meetings, which are not too short or too long and are held frequently, are valuable for health care team operation, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Pre-Referral Workup for GI, Liver Conditions Can Be Optimized

FRIDAY, Aug. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Pre-referral workup for gastroenterology and hepatology conditions can be optimized using Delphi methodology, according to research published online July 30 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Many Hospitals Being Penalized for 30-Day Readmissions

FRIDAY, Aug. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About half of the nation's hospitals are being penalized by Medicare for having patients return within a month of discharge, losing a combined $420 million, according to a report published by Kaiser Health.

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Chronic HCV Diagnosed in 4.2 Percent of Inpatient Cohort

THURSDAY, Aug. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening program diagnosed chronic HCV infection in 4.2 percent of baby boomers tested, according to a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Bariatric Surgery Benefits May Fade With Time

THURSDAY, Aug. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although weight-loss surgery may produce initial dramatic weight loss and improve type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests that in the long run, many people regain weight and see their diabetes return. The report was published online Aug. 5 in JAMA Surgery.

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Current Cleaning Protocols Not Enough for Endoscopes

THURSDAY, Aug. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Despite adherence to current U.S. reprocessing guidelines, microbes and biologic debris persist on endoscopes, according to research published in the Aug. 1 issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Infliximab Lost Into Feces of Patients With Ulcerative Colitis

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with moderate to severely active ulcerative colitis (UC), clinical nonresponders to infliximab have high concentrations of infliximab in fecal samples, according to a study published in the August issue of Gastroenterology.

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Urine Test May Help ID Pancreatic Cancer Earlier

MONDAY, Aug. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists report that they have developed a urine test that may detect pancreatic cancer at an early stage. The findings were published in the Aug. 1 issue of Clinical Cancer Research.

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WHO: 'Ring' Vaccination for Ebola Very Promising

MONDAY, Aug. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental Ebola vaccine appears highly effective, according to an interim analysis of findings from a clinical trial being conducted in the West African nation of Guinea. An independent body of international experts conducted the review and recommended that the trial of the VSV-EBOV vaccine continue. The findings were published online July 31 in The Lancet.

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L-Carnitine May Reduce Muscle Cramps in Patients With Cirrhosis

MONDAY, Aug. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- L-carnitine appears to be safe and effective for reducing muscle cramps in patients with cirrhosis, according to a study published in the August issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Review: mHealth Text Messages Promote Medication Adherence

MONDAY, Aug. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Mobile health (mHealth) short message service text messages can improve medication adherence, according to a review published online July 27 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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