August 2015 Briefing - Cardiology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for August 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Periodontal Disease Predicts CAC Progression in Type 1 Diabetes

MONDAY, Aug. 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with type 1 diabetes, but not those without diabetes, periodontal disease duration is an independent predictor of long-term progression of coronary artery calcium (CAC), according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Nonalbuminuric CKD Ups Cardiovascular Morbidity in T1DM

MONDAY, Aug. 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nonalbuminuric chronic kidney disease is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, but not renal outcomes, in patients with type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online Aug. 26 in Diabetes Care.

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FDA Approves Repatha for Certain Patients With High Cholesterol

FRIDAY, Aug. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Repatha (evolocumab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the second non-statin drug in its class approved to treat high cholesterol.

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Azithromycin Routine in Hospital Despite Risk for QTc Prolongation

FRIDAY, Aug. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Azithromycin is routinely prescribed to hospitalized patients despite risk factors for corrected QT (QTc) prolongation and administration of interacting medications, according to a study published online Aug. 19 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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AMA: Ruling Makes It Easier for Insurers to Terminate Doctors

FRIDAY, Aug. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The outcome of a recent case regarding the termination of physicians by an insurance company following a dispute over the necessity of medical services provided has serious implications for physicians and their patients, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Lower Risk of Dabigatran-Tied Bleeding With Gastroprotection

FRIDAY, Aug. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients taking dabigatran, the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) is reduced with use of gastroprotective agents, according to a study published in the September issue of Gastroenterology.

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Nonlinear Link for LDL, HDL With MACE Similar in RA, Non-RA

THURSDAY, Aug. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The nonlinear relationships for low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol with major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) seen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients do not differ from those in non-RA controls, according to a study published in the August issue of Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Psoriasis Patients at Higher Risk for Arrhythmia

THURSDAY, Aug. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with psoriasis are at higher risk of developing arrhythmia, even after controlling for other risk factors, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Periop Bridging Unnecessary for Most A-Fib Patients on Warfarin

THURSDAY, Aug. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For most atrial fibrillation patients taking warfarin who require temporary interruption for a procedure, perioperative bridging with heparin is unnecessary, according to a study published in the Aug. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Smoking Cessation Boosts Mental Health, QOL After Heart Attack

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking cessation after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) reduces angina and boosts mental health and quality of life, according to research published online Aug. 25 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Worse Outcomes for Children With Delay in Epinephrine

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Delay in epinephrine administration is associated with worse outcomes for children with in-hospital cardiac arrest with an initial nonshockable rhythm, according to a study published in the Aug. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Healthier Diet Linked to Reduced Congenital Heart Defects

TUESDAY, Aug. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women who follow a very healthy diet are much less likely than those who eat poorly to have a baby with tetralogy of Fallot or atrial septal defects, according to a study published online Aug. 24 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood-Fetal & Neonatal Edition.

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No Cognitive Benefits Seen for Elderly Who Stop HTN Rx

TUESDAY, Aug. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Discontinuing antihypertensive treatment in seniors with mild cognitive deficits does not improve mental functioning, according to research published online Aug. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Exercise Can Help Control A-Fib in Overweight Patients

TUESDAY, Aug. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise appears to help control atrial fibrillation (AF) in overweight or obese patients, according to a study published in the Sept. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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High Uric Acid Levels Linked to Greater Mortality

TUESDAY, Aug. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- High serum uric acid levels are associated with greater risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, but not cancer mortality, in elderly adults, according to a study published online Aug. 16 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Too Few Blacks, Hispanics Pursuing Careers As Physicians

TUESDAY, Aug. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Too few members of certain minority groups are pursuing careers in U.S. medicine, resulting in a serious lack of diversity among general practitioners and specialists, according to a research letter published online Aug. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Catheter-Directed, Low-Dose Fibrinolysis Safe, Effective for PE

TUESDAY, Aug. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis appears safe and efficacious for acute massive and submassive pulmonary embolism (PE), according to a study published in the Aug. 24 issue of JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Increasing Use of Statins for Primary Prevention in Elderly

MONDAY, Aug. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a sharp rise in the use of statins among elderly patients who do not have vascular disease, but there is little research to guide the use of these medicines in this group of patients, according to a research letter published online Aug. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Supportive Doctors Boost Patients' Weight-Loss Efforts

MONDAY, Aug. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Weight loss is more successful for obese patients who feel they have the most helpful doctors compared to those who feel their doctors are less helpful, according to a study published in the September issue of Patient Education & Counseling.

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Nonselective Beta-Blocker Use Ups Survival in Ovarian Cancers

MONDAY, Aug. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nonselective beta-blocker use is associated with improved overall survival among patients with epithelial ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancers (collectively, epithelial ovarian cancer [EOC]), according to a study published online Aug. 24 in Cancer.

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Spouses of Stroke Survivors Report Reduced Quality of Life

FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Caring for a spouse who has had a stroke can harm both mental and physical health, according to research published online Aug. 20 in Stroke.

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Lipophilic Superior to Hydrophilic Statin in Heart Failure

FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with heart failure, treatment effects are superior with lipophilic versus hydrophilic statins, according to a meta-analysis published online Aug. 17 in Cardiovascular Therapeutics.

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Patient, Family Advisors Can Play Key Role in Practices

FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Practices can employ patient and family advisors in order to help them focus on patient-centered care needs, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Long-Acting Analog Insulin Doesn't Up AMI Risk in T2DM

THURSDAY, Aug. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is not significantly different for long-acting insulin analogs versus other basal insulin therapies, according to a study published online Aug. 17 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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Report Highlights Ways to Improve Physician Resilience

THURSDAY, Aug. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Strategies can be adopted for improving physician resilience and the ability to handle the challenges presented by patient care, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Long Work Hours Linked to Increased Risk of Stroke

THURSDAY, Aug. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Working long hours is associated with increased risk of stroke, and with a smaller increased risk of coronary heart disease, according to research published online Aug. 19 in the The Lancet.

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Two-Thirds of Acute AAA Occur in Those Aged 75 Years and Older

THURSDAY, Aug. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two-thirds of acute abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) events occur in those aged ≥75 years, with most events in men younger than 75 years occurring in smokers, according to a study published online Aug. 19 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Heart Safety of Testosterone Unclear for Older Men

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Trials should be conducted to better establish the cardiovascular safety of testosterone therapy, according to a perspective piece published in the Aug. 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Role of SNP Variant in FTO Explored in Obesity

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A single nucleotide variant in the FTO obesity locus disrupts a conserved motif, which has obesity effects, according to a study published online Aug. 19 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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EHR Data Refine Risk Prediction for Post-PCI Readmission

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patient characteristics extracted from their electronic health records can be used to refine risk prediction for hospital readmission after percutaneous coronary intervention, according to a study published online Aug. 18 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Risk Factors Can ID Patients More Likely to Be Readmitted

TUESDAY, Aug. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients at greatest risk for an unplanned hospital readmission include those with chronic cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, those discharged on Fridays, and those with a high number of previous emergency department visits, according to a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Post-Exercise ABI Expands Clinical, Prognostic Information

MONDAY, Aug. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with normal and abnormal resting ankle-brachial index (ABI), post-exercise ABI expands clinical and prognostic information, according to a study published in the Aug. 17 issue of JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Improved Outcomes With Early Mitral Regurgitation Surgery

MONDAY, Aug. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Excess postoperative mortality and morbidity is seen with use of guideline-based indications for mitral regurgitation surgery versus early surgery, according to a study published in the July issue of the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery.

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Serious Childhood Infection Tied to Metabolic Disease Later in Life

MONDAY, Aug. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Infection-related hospitalization (IRH) during childhood is independently associated with adverse adult metabolic variables, according to a study published online Aug. 17 in Pediatrics.

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Metabolic Changes With Metformin May Lower LDL-C

MONDAY, Aug. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The diabetes drug metformin changes metabolic profiles of three metabolites that may lower LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), according to a study published online Aug. 5 in Diabetes Care.

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mHealth Technologies Show Potential for CVD Prevention

FRIDAY, Aug. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Mobile health (mHealth) technologies have the potential to improve cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention in terms of targeting lifestyle behaviors, despite limited evidence on their effectiveness, according to a scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA) published online Aug. 13 in Circulation.

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Long-Term Insulin Pump Use Reduces Mortality in T1DM

FRIDAY, Aug. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with type 1 diabetes, long-term use of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (insulin pump therapy) is associated with reduced cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, according to a study published online June 22 in The BMJ.

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U-Shaped Link for Physical Activity, Heart Failure in Men

THURSDAY, Aug. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There is a U-shaped correlation for physical activity with risk of heart failure among men, according to a study published online Aug. 12 in JACC: Heart Failure.

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More Physicians Reporting Dissatisfaction With EHR Systems

THURSDAY, Aug. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More physicians report being dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with their electronic health record (EHR) system, compared with five years ago, according to a report published by the AmericanEHR Partners and the American Medical Association.

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Some Minorities Less Likely to Call 911 for Stroke

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of emergency medical service (EMS) transport varies by race and sex among U.S. stroke patients, according to a study published online Aug. 12 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Troponin T Predicts Cardio Events in T2DM Patients With Stable IHD

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes and stable ischemic heart disease, troponin T concentrations predict cardiovascular events, according to a study published in the Aug. 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Trans, but Not Saturated, Fats Up All-Cause Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Trans fats, but not saturated fats, are associated with all-cause mortality, coronary heart disease (CHD), and CHD-associated mortality, according to a systematic review published online Aug. 11 in The BMJ.

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Testosterone Doesn't Spur Atherosclerosis in Older Men

TUESDAY, Aug. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For older men with low or low-normal testosterone levels, testosterone administration for three years is not associated with atherosclerosis progression, according to a study published in the Aug. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Diastolic Dysfunction Common After Anthracycline Chemo

TUESDAY, Aug. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Diastolic dysfunction (DD) frequently develops after anthracycline chemotherapy for breast cancer, according to a study published online July 16 in The Oncologist.

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HAC Reduction Program Penalty Kicks in for FY2015

TUESDAY, Aug. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The latest Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) effort to reduce hospital-acquired conditions (HACs) is the HAC Reduction Program, according to an Aug. 6 health policy brief published in Health Affairs.

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Guideline-Based Protocol Ups Adherence to VTE Prophylaxis

TUESDAY, Aug. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Introduction of a guideline-based protocol significantly increases compliance with guidelines for prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE), according to a brief report published online Aug. 9 in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology.

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In-Person Staff Meetings Are Valuable for Health Care Teams

MONDAY, Aug. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In-person staff meetings, which are not too short or too long and are held frequently, are valuable for health care team operation, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Calculated LDL-C Varies at Lower Values of Measured LDL-C

MONDAY, Aug. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- At lower values of measured low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), the variation and bias of calculated LDL-C increases, according to a study published in the Aug. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Continuous Exercise Training After MI Beneficial in Mice

MONDAY, Aug. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Continuous exercise training before and after myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with improved adverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling in mice, according to a study published in the July 15 issue of the American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

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One-Third of People Believe Alcohol Is Heart-Healthy

FRIDAY, Aug. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately one-third of the public believes alcohol is heart-healthy, according to a study published in the Aug. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Many Hospitals Being Penalized for 30-Day Readmissions

FRIDAY, Aug. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About half of the nation's hospitals are being penalized by Medicare for having patients return within a month of discharge, losing a combined $420 million, according to a report published by Kaiser Health.

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Bariatric Surgery Benefits May Fade With Time

THURSDAY, Aug. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although weight-loss surgery may produce initial dramatic weight loss and improve type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests that in the long run, many people regain weight and see their diabetes return. The report was published online Aug. 5 in JAMA Surgery.

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Cardiac Rehab Participation Too Low Among Acute MI Survivors

THURSDAY, Aug. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac rehabilitation programs are considered a key part of recovering from acute myocardial infarction (AMI) -- but only a small minority of patients ever attend one, according to a research letter published online Aug. 3 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Bariatric Surgery May Lower Tolerance for Alcohol

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who undergo Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery are far less able to process alcohol after their procedure, a small, new study suggests. The research was reported online Aug. 5 in JAMA Surgery.

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Spicy Food Consumption Linked to Reduced Mortality Risk

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adults who regularly eat spicy foods appear to have a reduced mortality risk, according to research published online Aug. 4 in The BMJ.

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One in Four With MI and A-Fib Discharged on Triple Therapy

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About one-quarter of older patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) and atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are discharged on triple therapy (warfarin, aspirin, and clopidogrel), according to a study published in the Aug. 11 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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No Quick Fix in Cardiac Fat Metabolism From Calorie Cuts

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Seven-day caloric and saturated fat restriction was found to increase myocardial dietary fatty acid (DFA) partitioning in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), according to research published online July 29 in Diabetes.

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Women, Blacks Fare Worse After Acute Myocardial Infarction

TUESDAY, Aug. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) takes more years from the expected life spans of women and blacks than from white males, according to a study published in the Aug. 11 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Chloride Levels Linked to Mortality in Heart Failure

TUESDAY, Aug. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Serum chloride levels at admission are associated with mortality among patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), according to a study published in the Aug. 11 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Novel Stem Cell Approach Promising for Heart Failure

MONDAY, Aug. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new method for delivering stem cells to damaged heart muscle has shown early promise in treating severe heart failure, researchers report online July 27 in Stem Cells Translational Medicine.

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Review: mHealth Text Messages Promote Medication Adherence

MONDAY, Aug. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Mobile health (mHealth) short message service text messages can improve medication adherence, according to a review published online July 27 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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Standing More Can Benefit Cardiometabolic Health

MONDAY, Aug. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Sitting appears to be linked to increased blood glucose and cholesterol levels, but standing more helps improve all these measures, according to research published online July 31 in the European Heart Journal.

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For Obese Women, Exercise Plus Phototherapy Beneficial

MONDAY, Aug. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise training combined with phototherapy is associated with improvements in the metabolic profiles of obese women, according to a study published online July 29 in Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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