ASN: Sickle Cell Trait Linked to Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease

This article originally appeared here.
Share this content:
ASN: Sickle Cell Trait Linked to Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease
ASN: Sickle Cell Trait Linked to Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease

(HealthDay News) -- For African-Americans, sickle cell trait (SCT) is associated with increased risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD), according to a review published online Nov. 13 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The research was published to coincide with the American Society of Nephrology's Kidney Week 2014, held from Nov. 11 to 16 in Philadelphia.

Rakhi P. Naik, M.D., M.H.S., from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, and colleagues examined the correlation between SCT and CKD and albuminuria in self-identified African-Americans. Data were collected from five large prospective studies involving 15,975 self-identified African-Americans (1,248 with SCT [carriers] and 14,727 without SCT [noncarriers]).

The researchers found that, compared with noncarriers, carriers had increased risk of CKD (odds ratio, 1.57; absolute risk difference, 7.6 percent); incident CKD (odds ratio, 1.79; absolute risk difference, 8.5 percent); and decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR; odds ratio, 1.32; absolute risk difference, 6.1 percent). There was a correlation between SCT and albuminuria (odds ratio, 1.86; absolute risk difference, 12.6 percent).

"Among African-Americans in these cohorts, the presence of SCT was associated with an increased risk of CKD, decline in eGFR, and albuminuria, compared with noncarriers," the authors write. "These findings suggest that SCT may be associated with the higher risk of kidney disease in African-Americans."

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

Abstract
Full Text
More Information

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

Trending Activities

All Professions



Sign up for myCME e-newsletters


More in Home

Surveillance Frequency Doesn't Cut Mortality in Colorectal Cancer

Surveillance Frequency Doesn't Cut Mortality in Colorectal Cancer

And, intensity of imaging surveillance not linked to time to detection of colorectal cancer recurrence

Procalcitonin Assay Doesn't Cut Antibiotic Use in Lower RTI

Procalcitonin Assay Doesn't Cut Antibiotic Use in Lower ...

Provision of assay doesn't result in less antibiotic use for suspected lower respiratory tract infection

Preventing Child Maltreatment Not Yet Feasible in Primary Care

Preventing Child Maltreatment Not Yet Feasible in Primary ...

USPSTF says evidence inadequate for primary care interventions to prevent child maltreatment

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »