April 2015 Briefing - Pediatrics

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for April 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Investigational MenB Vaccine Can Protect Individuals in Outbreak

THURSDAY, April 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An investigational serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccine seems to have protected vaccinated individuals from the disease during an outbreak, according to a study published online April 27 in Pediatrics.

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Intensive T1DM Control Greatly Lowers Odds of Ocular Surgery

THURSDAY, April 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive management of type 1 diabetes can reduce the risk of having a diabetes-related ocular surgery by nearly 50 percent, according to a new report. Results of the study were published in the April 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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3-D Printing Method Successfully Treats Tracheobrochomalacia

THURSDAY, April 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An implant created with a three-dimensional (3-D) printer has demonstrated success in three patients, from 3 to 16 months old, with tracheobronchomalacia, according to trial results published in the April 29 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Breastfeeding Linked to Better Breast Cancer Outcomes for Mom

WEDNESDAY, April 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women who breastfeed their babies and later develop breast cancer are less likely to have the cancer return or be terminal than women who do not breastfeed, new research shows. The study was published online April 28 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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AAP: Guidelines Updated for Lice Infestation Among Children

WEDNESDAY, April 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Outbreaks of head lice in children can be effectively treated without banning infected children from school, new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) say. The guidelines were published online April 27 in Pediatrics.

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WHO Offers Evidence-Based Folate Concentration Guidelines

WEDNESDAY, April 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence-based folate concentration guidelines for the prevention of neural tube defects (NTDs) have been developed by the World Health Organization (WHO), according to a report published in the April 24 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Microneedle Patch Could Offer Alternative Mode of Vaccination

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A microneedle patch may be an easier, safer, and more convenient way to vaccinate more people worldwide against measles and other vaccine-preventable diseases, new research suggests.

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Physician Compensation Up for Most Specialties

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physician compensation has gone up for almost all specialties, according to a 2015 report published by Medscape.

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CDC: Surveillance System Can Help Reduce Health Care Injuries

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A surveillance system for health care facilities can be used to identify and help reduce the number of preventable injuries among health care personnel, according to research published in the April 24 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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AAP Advises Doctors on How to Identify Child Abuse

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has just released new guidance to help primary care doctors recognize the signs of child abuse. The clinical report was published online April 27 in Pediatrics.

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High Sodium Intake Does Not Appear to Raise BP in Teen Girls

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Consuming higher-than-recommended amounts of salt appears to have no ill effect on teenage girls' blood pressure, according to new research published online April 27 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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HHS: New Recommendation for Fluoride Levels in Drinking Water

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. government has decreased its recommended level of fluoride in drinking water for the first time in a half-century.

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Early Benefits for Quadrivalent HPV Vaccine in Canadian Teens

MONDAY, April 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) vaccination for young girls is associated with reduced incidence of dysplasia and anogenital warts (AGW), according to a study published online April 27 in Pediatrics.

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AAP: Updated Guidelines on Newborn Hospital Release

MONDAY, April 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has just released updated guidelines for judging whether or not a newborn is ready for hospital discharge. The guidelines are published online April 27 in Pediatrics.

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Focus on Calories Versus Quality of Food Misdirected

FRIDAY, April 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- All calories are not created equal and some foods are not as bad for weight management as many believe, according to new research published online April 8 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Exercise Can't Fix the Damage of a Bad Diet

FRIDAY, April 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although physical activity is important for health, a healthy diet is essential for weight loss -- and regular exercise will not make up for a poor diet, according to an editorial published online April 22 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

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VNN1 Gene Potentially Useful Biomarker in Childhood Asthma

THURSDAY, April 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they've identified a gene that affects whether children with asthma respond to corticosteroids. The study was published online April 21 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Gene Tx May Benefit Children, Teens With Wiskott-Aldrich Sx

THURSDAY, April 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Gene therapy may benefit children and teens with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, a rare immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the WAS gene, according to a small new study published in the April 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on child health.

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EHR Data Mining Helps With Quality Improvement

WEDNESDAY, April 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic health records (EHRs) are a valuable source of data that can be mined to help practices with quality improvement performance, according to a study published in Medical Economics.

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ACP Supports Ban on Flavoring, Ads for E-Cigarettes

WEDNESDAY, April 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration should ban flavorings and television advertisements for e-cigarettes, according to a position paper released by the American College of Physicians (ACP) and published in the April 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Increasing Number of Children Present With DKA in T1DM

WEDNESDAY, April 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A growing number of American children and teens with type 1 diabetes are experiencing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) at the time of their diagnosis, according to research published in the April 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on child health.

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Eating Disorders Common in Girls With Type 1 Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, April 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For girls and young women with type 1 diabetes, eating disorders are common and persistent, according to a study published online April 17 in Diabetes Care.

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High-Dose Oral Insulin Promising for Prevention of T1DM

WEDNESDAY, April 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In a small, preliminary study, high-dose insulin capsules safely induced what appears to be a protective immune response in children at high risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The study findings were published in the April 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on child health.

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More Reassurance Against MMR-Autism Link

WEDNESDAY, April 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Yet another study finds no evidence that the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine raises the risk of autism -- even among children who are at increased genetic risk. The latest research was reported in the April 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on child health.

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Parent Training Program Can Improve Child Behavior in Autism

WEDNESDAY, April 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Training programs for parents can help improve the behavior of children with autism, according to a study published in the April 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on child health.

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EHR Decision Support Ups Radiologic Test Appropriateness

TUESDAY, April 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Computerized clinical decision-support (CCDS) capabilities of electronic health records may improve appropriate use of diagnostic radiologic test ordering and reduce test use, according to a review published in the April 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Sports Participation Seems Safe for Children With LQTS

TUESDAY, April 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There is no evidence of cardiac events or deaths occurring in treatment-compliant genotype-positive long QT syndrome (LQTS) pediatric patients who participate in sports, according to research published in the March 1 issue of JACC: Clinical Electrophysiology.

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Strategies Successful for Helping Children Swallow Meds

TUESDAY, April 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- At least five different strategies may help children swallow pills and capsules more easily, according to research published online April 20 in Pediatrics.

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Guidance Offered for Managing Conflict With Patients

MONDAY, April 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Good communication is key to managing conflict with patients, according to an article published April 1 in Medical Economics.

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Wide Variation in NICU Antibiotic Prescribing Patterns

MONDAY, April 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Antibiotics appear to be overused in many neonatal intensive care units, new research suggests. The findings were published online April 20 in Pediatrics.

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Antibiotic-Glucocorticoid Eardrops Found Superior in Acute Otorrhea

MONDAY, April 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For children with tympanostomy tubes who develop otorrhea, antibiotic-glucocorticoid eardrops are clinically superior and cost less than oral antibiotics or initial observation, according to a study published online April 20 in Pediatrics.

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Higher Altitude Linked With Lower Rates of ADHD

FRIDAY, April 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The effects of higher altitude may reduce the risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a new study suggests. The research was published online March 25 in the Journal of Attention Disorders.

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Allergy Season Predicted to Be One of the Worst, but Shorter

FRIDAY, April 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Experts are predicting that this allergy season may be one of the worst in years.

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CDC Details Mosquito-Borne Virus-Linked Death in Tennessee

FRIDAY, April 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have characterized a La Crosse virus isolate from the brain of a child who died of encephalitis-associated complications in eastern Tennessee in 2012.

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Suboptimal Prescribing Attitudes Could Signal Personal Distress

FRIDAY, April 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students in personal distress may be more likely to have suboptimal attitudes about self-prescribing and personal responsibility for reporting impaired colleagues, according to a study published in the April issue of Academic Medicine.

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Apple HealthKit App Facilitates Doctor-Patient Communication

THURSDAY, April 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The latest version of Apple's operating system iOS 8 allows physicians to connect with patients in many ways using the HealthKit app that collects user health and fitness data, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Aerosolized Measles Vaccine Inferior to Subcutaneous Vaccine

THURSDAY, April 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- With respect to seropositivity, aerosolized vaccination against measles is inferior to the subcutaneous vaccine, according to a study published in the April 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Modified Timolol Agent Effective for Infantile Hemangiomas

THURSDAY, April 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new modified timolol-based cream seems effective for infantile hemangiomas (IHs), according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of Dermatology.

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Ethical Implications for Looking Up Applicants on Facebook

THURSDAY, April 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Looking up students on Facebook and other social networking sites (SNS) is associated with ethical concerns, according to a perspective piece published in the March issue of the Journal of Graduate Medical Education.

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Response to Parental Concerns of Autism Found Lacking

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The behavior of health care providers is likely a very important factor in delayed autism identification, according to new research published online April 14 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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AMA Announces End of Sustainable Growth Rate Formula

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Recently adopted legislation has repealed the sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Lansoprazole Worsens Asthma Control in Poor Metabolizers

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Children with poor metabolizer phenotype based on CYP2C19 have worse asthma control after six months of lansoprazole treatment, according to a study published online April 6 in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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Survey Looks at Patient Attitudes Regarding Informed Consent

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most U.S. adults would prefer to be asked for permission to participate in studies assessing usual medical practices, according to a study published online April 14 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Gestational Diabetes May Increase Risk of Autism

TUESDAY, April 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Gestational diabetes may increase the risk a child will develop autism, according to research published in the April 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Security Breaches of Health Records Up Over Past Decade

TUESDAY, April 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Breaches in data security exposed more than 29 million health records to potential criminal misuse between 2010 and 2013, according to a new study. Security breaches involving hacking have nearly doubled in recent years, rising to 8.7 percent in 2013 compared with 4.7 percent in 2010, according to the study, published as a research letter in the April 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Placebo Response May Depend on Individual DNA

TUESDAY, April 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The strength of the placebo effect may depend on particular DNA, according to a report published online April 13 in Trends in Molecular Medicine.

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Quality Improvement Intervention Cuts Lost OR Time

TUESDAY, April 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Significant reductions can be made in operating room (OR) time lost due to cancellation on the day of surgery (DoSC), according to a study published online April 13 in Pediatrics.

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HPV4 Vaccine Cost-Effective for OPC Prevention in Teen Boys

MONDAY, April 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV4) vaccine appears to be cost-effective for the prevention of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) among 12-year-old males, according to a study published online April 13 in Cancer.

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Confidentiality Shortcomings With EHR Use for Parents, Teens

MONDAY, April 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic health records (EHRs) and personal health records (PHRs) require significant modifications in order to meet the confidentiality requirements of specific populations, including parents and adolescents, according to a perspective piece published online April 13 in Pediatrics.

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Improvement Seen in the Pediatric Readiness of ERs

MONDAY, April 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The pediatric readiness of U.S. emergency departments has improved, according to research published online April 13 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Peritoneal Drainage, Laparotomy Cuts Mortality in NEC

MONDAY, April 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For infants with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), peritoneal drainage followed by laparotomy is associated with reduced mortality but increased costs compared with peritoneal drainage alone, according to a study published online April 13 in Pediatrics.

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Many Doctors Haven't Started Dealing With ICD-10 Revision

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most physicians have barely begun to deal with issues relating to documentation associated with the transition to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10), according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Medical Debt Burden Higher in Texas, Florida

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Significantly more adults in Florida and Texas struggle to pay medical bills or pay off medical debt over time compared with residents of New York and California, according to a new Commonwealth Fund report released Friday.

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Children With Neuro Disorders Need Flu Vaccine, May Not Get It

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Children with neurological disorders such as epilepsy or cerebral palsy are at increased risk for complications from the flu, but are no more likely to receive a flu vaccine than other children are, a new U.S. study shows. The study, published online March 30 in Vaccine, was conducted with researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Art Program Hones Med Students' Visual Observation Skills

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An innovative interdisciplinary program, Art Rounds, is effective for improving medical and nursing students' physical observation skills, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of Nursing Education.

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Two New Strategies Show Promise in Treating Crohn's Dz

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two experimental therapies show promise in management of Crohn's disease.

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Cases of Melanoma Declining in U.S. Children

THURSDAY, April 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of melanoma is falling among American children, according to a new study published online April 9 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Migraine Medication Linked to Eating Disorders in Teens

THURSDAY, April 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Topiramate (Topamax) used for migraine headaches has been linked to increased odds of eating disorders in some teens. The report was published online April 6 in Pediatrics.

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Pharmacists Raise Concerns for Patient Access to Generic Drugs

THURSDAY, April 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly all pharmacists have experienced upswings in the acquisition costs of generic drugs, with price spikes reported to be worse since 2013, according to a report published by the National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA).

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Limited Time Available to Review Sunshine Act Data

WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have only 45 days to review and dispute reports regarding their financial ties to drug and medical device manufacturers reported under the Physician Payments Sunshine Act, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

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CDC: Long-Acting Contraceptive Use Rising Among U.S. Teens

WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The use of long-acting, reversible forms of contraception remains low among sexually active teen girls, though that trend seems to be changing, according to research published in the April 7 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Case Report of Food Allergy Acquired Via Blood Transfusion

TUESDAY, April 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The case of an 8-year-old Canadian boy suggests that it's possible, but still rare, for children to develop food allergies from blood transfusions. The report was published in the April 7 issue of CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Med Students, Residents Rarely Perform Stethoscope Hygiene

TUESDAY, April 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Stethoscope hygiene is rarely performed by trainee physicians, according to a research letter published online April 2 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Youth Guidelines Would Significantly Up Statin Rates

MONDAY, April 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- If all physicians followed new cholesterol guidelines aimed at children, almost half a million Americans aged 17 to 21 would be prescribed a statin, new research predicts. The study was published online April 6 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Online Human Milk Samples May Contain Cow's Milk

MONDAY, April 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About 10 percent of online human milk samples tested were contaminated with cow's milk in a recent study published online April 6 in Pediatrics.

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2014 Bronchiolitis Guidelines Focus on Avoiding Interventions

MONDAY, April 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The 2014 new and updated guidelines for management of bronchiolitis largely focus on tests or treatments to avoid, according to a perspective piece published online April 6 in Pediatrics.

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Statistical Model Helps Predict Neonatal Intubation Competency

MONDAY, April 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Neonatal intubation competency can be modeled using a Bayesian statistical model, according to a study published online April 6 in Pediatrics.

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Article Highlights Legal Issues Linked to Physician Extenders

FRIDAY, April 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The use of physician extenders (PEs; mainly physician assistants and nurse practitioners) may bring added legal risks to a practice, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Three-Quarters of Children With ADHD Take Meds

FRIDAY, April 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most children with special health care needs (CSHCN) with current attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) receive medication treatment or behavioral therapy, according to a study published online March 31 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Sodium Content Too High in Over Half of Packaged Foods

FRIDAY, April 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of packaged grocery store foods included in a new study contained too much added salt, U.S. health officials reported Thursday. The report was published April 2 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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New Guidelines Could Up Care Access for Millions in Africa

FRIDAY, April 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Newborns and young infants in developing nations who have suspected severe bacterial infections can be effectively treated outside a hospital, three new studies suggest. The new studies were published online April 1 in The Lancet and The Lancet Global Health.

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Pediatric Discoid Lupus Carries Significant Progression Risk

FRIDAY, April 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) carries a significant risk of progression to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), according to a review published in the April issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Key Disordered Eating Info Not Reaching Overweight Youth

FRIDAY, April 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Eating disorder education needs to reach overweight youth, according to a study published in the April issue of the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

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Bleach Exposure May Increase Risk of Infections in Children

FRIDAY, April 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Bleach exposure is associated with increased risk of respiratory and other infections in school-aged children, according to a study published online April 2 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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Women Overweight in Youth May Face Higher CRC Risk

THURSDAY, April 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women who were overweight as children and teens may have a greater risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), no matter what their current weight, a new study cautions. The findings were published in the April issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Review: Vegan-Vegetarian Diets Seem Safe in Pregnancy

THURSDAY, April 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Vegan-vegetarian diets appear to be safe in pregnancy, according to a review published in the April issue of BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

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Patients May Be Modifying Meds Due to Trouble Swallowing

THURSDAY, April 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some patients experience difficulties swallowing and modify medication dosage forms, without necessarily consulting health professionals, according to research published in the March issue of the Journal of Pharmacy Practice and Research.

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Legal Issues of Removing Patient From Practice Explored

WEDNESDAY, April 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The legal and ethical responsibilities of removing a patient from practice are discussed in an article published March 16 in Medical Economics.

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Plasma B12 Levels Tied to Anorexia Nervosa Severity

WEDNESDAY, April 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with anorexia nervosa, plasma levels of vitamin B12 might be an early marker of liver dysfunction and are possibly related to more severe psychopathological aspects, according to a study published in the April issue of the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

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Obesity Ups Respiratory Events in Peds Procedural Sedation

WEDNESDAY, April 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity is associated with increased odds of respiratory events and more frequent need for airway intervention in patients undergoing pediatric procedural sedation, according to a study published online March 27 in Pediatric Anesthesia.

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