American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, July 20-23

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The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting

The annual meeting of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine was held from July 20 to 23 in Toronto and attracted more than 1,500 participants from around the world, including sports medicine specialists, athletic trainers, physical therapists, and family physicians. The conference featured the latest advances in sports medicine, with presentations focusing on the identification, prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of sports injuries.

In a study of 132 pitcher seasons in Major League Baseball, Christopher L. Camp, M.D., of the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City, and colleagues found that deficits in shoulder external rotation and forward flexion during pre-season physicals was associated with an increased risk for sustaining an elbow injury during the ensuing season.

"Historically, we have focused on glenohumeral internal rotation deficits (GIRD), but GIRD was not associated with an increased risk of injury in this particular study. This work highlights the fact that internal rotation (GIRD) is not the only important factor to consider," Camp said. "Both external rotation and forward flexion are critical measures as well. This work really supports the concept of the 'kinetic chain,' which describes the process of energy transfer from the feet, through the hips and trunk, to the shoulder, elbow, and eventually the ball. When there are errors or aberrant motion at one link in the chain (i.e., the shoulder), this has an adverse effect on the subsequent segments (i.e., the elbow)."

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In another study, Michelle T. Sugi, M.D., M.P.H., of the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, and colleagues aimed to provide more information on pectoralis major tendon rupture demographics and surgical outcomes.

"We present a series of 134 traumatic pectoralis major tendon ruptures, which were treated surgically at our institution. This is the largest single series regarding the surgical treatment of pectoralis major tendon ruptures in a nonmilitary population," Sugi said. "Surgical repair of acute pectoralis major tendon ruptures can be performed safely with a low re-rupture rate and low risk of complications."

Sugi added that there is considerable variation in surgical fixation treatment options for pectoralis major tendon ruptures. The use of a suture button had the lowest complication rate, resulted in the fastest release from medical care, and may offer improved outcomes.

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Patrick S. Buckley, M.D., of the Rothman Institute at the Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia, and colleagues found that current high school athletes specialized, on average, two years earlier than current collegiate and professional athletes.

"The presentation highlights our research on single sport specialization, where we found that current high school athletes specialized to play only one sport at an earlier age than current professional athletes. High school athletes also recalled a higher incidence of sports-related injury that they attributed to specialization. It is important to emphasize, however, that this was based on the athlete's ability to recall an injury, but didn't actually measure specific injury data," Buckley said. "Additionally, current professional athletes specialized to play a single sport at a lower frequency and at an older age than current high school athletes. These data suggest that early single sport specialization may not be necessary for professional advancement."

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AOSSM: New Surgical Option for Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears

WEDNESDAY, July 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Arthroscopic superior capsule reconstruction can benefit patients with shoulder injuries once considered beyond repair, according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, held from July 20 to 23 in Toronto.

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AOSSM: Activity, QoL Still Good 10 Years After ACL Repair

FRIDAY, July 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who undergo knee surgery for a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can expect to stay active and maintain a high quality of life, according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, held from July 20 to 23 in Toronto.

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