American College of Cardiology, April 2-4

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The American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session & Expo

The annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology was held from April 2 to 4 in Chicago and attracted more than 20,000 participants from around the world, including clinicians, academicians, allied health professionals, and others interested in cardiology. The conference highlighted recent advances in the treatment, management, and prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), with presentations focusing on novel drugs and surgical approaches to improve the quality of care for patients with cardiovascular disease.

In a prospective cohort study of 15,809 participants from the Physicians' Health Study (PHS), Taraka Gadiraju, M.D., of the Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, and colleagues assessed CVD risk with fried food consumption using food frequency questionnaires.

"After controlling for potential confounding factors, frequent fried food consumption was associated with higher incidence of CVD deaths, with a hazard ratio of 1.61 for fried food consumption of greater than or equal to seven times per week," Gadiraju said. "To our knowledge, this is the first study that puts forth a positive association for excess fried food consumption and CVD mortality in a large cohort. Our data showed a positive and graded association between fried food consumption and CVD mortality in adult men. Confirmation of these findings in women is warranted."

According to Gadiraju, further studies are necessary to measure the association between fried food and coronary artery disease, with dietary assessment focusing on details such as the type of food/oil used, frying time, temperature, and the manner of frying.

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In another study, Sandra Lewis, M.D., of the Northwest Cardiovascular Institute in Portland, Oregon, and colleagues presented differences between men and women cardiologists that in many ways have not changed significantly over the 20 years the investigators have been performing surveys. The investigators found that the percentage of women in adult cardiology has remained low, with less than 12 percent of cardiologists being women, despite a higher percentage of trainees being women.

"Although, in general, women and men tend to be satisfied being cardiologists, family differences persist. Women are less satisfied with their family life and report less professional advancement compared to the men," Lewis said. "More men are married compared to women, while more women are single. Women are less likely to have children than their male counterparts. Women are more likely to interrupt their training and even more likely to interrupt their practice, typically for childbirth."

In addition, the investigators found that female cardiologists are more likely to have experienced discrimination than men, particularly gender discrimination.

"Cardiologists say that stress is typical of the job, and only 20 percent of women and 26 percent of men report no burnout," said Lewis. "Men are more likely to negotiate salary and time to promotion. Women are less likely to feel that their contributions matter, that they are valued and treated fairly." Overall, Lewis added, these findings reflect concerns for the future of cardiology leadership.

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Robert Jay Widmer, M.D., Ph.D., of the Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues found that digital/mobile health (patients using specially designed health tools on their smartphones and through a web-based portal) has an additive benefit over usual cardiac rehabilitation in terms of risk factor reduction -- specifically weight loss -- largely through improved dietary adherence.

"This is crucial, as most patients who enter cardiac rehabilitation after a heart attack are obese, and weight loss tends to predict better outcomes in these patients," Widmer said. "Digital/mobile health should be used as adjuncts in secondary cardiovascular prevention. These therapies are effective for dietary adherence and weight loss, and should be studied in longer-term trials. Yet, studies such as these beg the question regarding the potential of digital/mobile health as a replacement, altogether, for standard cardiac rehabilitation."

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ACC: More Evidence of Long-Term Benefits of Bariatric Surgery

WEDNESDAY, April 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New research adds to growing evidence that bariatric surgery helps patients with type 2 diabetes lower their blood glucose levels for at least five years. The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from April 2 to 4 in Chicago.

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ACC: Expert Guidance Issued for Use of Non-Statin Therapies

WEDNESDAY, April 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Expert consensus guidance has been issued regarding the use of non-statin therapies to lower cholesterol in high-risk patients. The consensus document was published online April 1 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from April 2 to 4 in Chicago.

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ACC: Vitamin D Found to Improve Cardiac Function in Heart Failure

TUESDAY, April 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Regular doses of vitamin D3 may improve cardiac function in heart failure patients, according to a study published online April 4 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The research was published to coincide with the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from April 2 to 4 in Chicago.

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ACC: Prognostic Value of Cardiac Noninvasive Tests Vary by Sex

TUESDAY, April 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with suspected coronary artery disease, the prognostic value of cardiac noninvasive tests (NITs) varies by test type and sex, according to a study published online April 4 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The research is being published to coincide with the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from April 2 to 4 in Chicago.

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ACC: Pharmacist Intervention Can Cut Cardiovascular Risk

TUESDAY, April 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A community pharmacy-based intervention can reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among high-risk patients, according to a study published online April 4 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The research is being published to coincide with the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from April 2 to 4 in Chicago.

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ACC: Prevalence of Familial Hypercholesterolemia <2 Percent

TUESDAY, April 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) mutations are seen in less than 2 percent of individuals with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol ≥190 mg/dL, according to a study published online April 3 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The research is being published to coincide with the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from April 2 to 4 in Chicago.

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ACC: Pre-pPCI Metoprolol Doesn't Reduce Infarct Size in STEMI

TUESDAY, April 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Early intravenous metoprolol before primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI) does not reduce infarct size in a population with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), according to a study published online April 3 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The research is being published to coincide with the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from April 2 to 4 in Chicago.

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ACC: Rate, Rhythm Control Both Effective for Post-Op A-Fib

TUESDAY, April 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with new-onset postoperative atrial fibrillation, outcomes are similar for rate control and rhythm control, according to a study published online April 4 in the New England Journal of Medicine. The research is being published to coincide with the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from April 2 to 4 in Chicago.

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ACC: Ixmyelocel-T Beneficial for Heart Failure With Reduced EF

MONDAY, April 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Ixmyelocel-T, an expanded multicellular therapy produced from a patient's own bone marrow, is effective for patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, according to a study published online April 4 in The Lancet. The research is being published to coincide with the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from April 2 to 4 in Chicago.

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ACC: TAVR Similar to Surgery for Intermediate-Risk Patients

MONDAY, April 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For intermediate-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis, outcomes are similar for transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR) and surgical aortic valve replacement, according to a study published online April 2 in the New England Journal of Medicine. The research is being published to coincide with the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from April 2 to 4 in Chicago.

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ACC: Losmapimod Doesn't Cut Cardio Events After Acute MI

MONDAY, April 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute myocardial infarction, use of losmapimod does not reduce major ischemic cardiovascular events compared with placebo, according to a study published online April 4 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The research is being published to coincide with the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from April 2 to 4 in Chicago.

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ACC: Evolocumab Reduces LDL-C in Statin-Intolerant Patients

MONDAY, April 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with muscle symptoms indicative of statin intolerance, evolocumab is associated with a significantly greater reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels compared with ezetimibe, according to a study published online April 3 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The research is being published to coincide with the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from April 2 to 4 in Chicago.

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ACC: Dying Patients Not Aware They Can Be Spared ICD Shocks

FRIDAY, March 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many physicians aren't following the Heart Rhythm Society and European Society of Cardiology recommendations regarding deactivation of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) for patients near death, according to research scheduled to be presented at the upcoming annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, to be held from April 2 to 4 in Chicago.

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ACC: Mammograms May Also Help Identify Cardiovascular Disease

FRIDAY, March 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Mammography may also be effective for identifying cardiovascular disease in women, according to a study published online March 24 in JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging. The research will also be presented at the upcoming annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, to be held from April 2 to 4 in Chicago.

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ACC: Leadless Pacemaker, Subcutaneous ICD Feasible

WEDNESDAY, March 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Intrabody, wireless unidirectional communication is possible using a leadless cardiac pacemaker (LCP) and subcutaneous implantable-cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD), according to a letter published online March 21 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The research will also be presented at the upcoming annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, to be held from April 2 to 4 in Chicago.

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ACC: Higher Platelet Inhibition With Switch to Ticagrelor

WEDNESDAY, March 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Switching from prasugrel to ticagrelor is associated with a transient increase in platelet inhibition, according to a study published online March 21 in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions. The research will also be presented at the upcoming annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, to be held from April 2 to 4 in Chicago.

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ACC: Good Outcomes for Endovascular Procedures for CLI

TUESDAY, March 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI), increasing rates of endovascular revascularization correlate with decreases in the rates of in-hospital death and major amputation, according to a study published online March 22 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The research will also be presented at the upcoming annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, to be held from April 2 to 4 in Chicago.

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ACC: Faster Absorption of Crushed Prasugrel in STEMI

TUESDAY, March 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Crushed prasugrel correlates with faster drug absorption for patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI), according to a study published online March 21 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The research will also be presented at the upcoming annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, to be held from April 2 to 4 in Chicago.

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ACC: PPI Tx Also Beneficial for Those on Low-Dose Aspirin

MONDAY, March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients requiring dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT), gastroprotection with proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) is also beneficial for patients receiving low-dose aspirin, according to a study published online March 21 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The research will also be presented at the upcoming annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, to be held from April 2 to 4 in Chicago.

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