American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, March 14-18

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The 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

The annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons was held from March 14 to 18 in San Diego and attracted approximately 30,000 participants from around the world. The conference highlighted recent advances in the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal conditions, with presentations focusing on joint fractures, osteoarthritis, and other musculoskeletal injuries, as well as factors impacting joint replacement procedure outcomes.

In one study, Wellington Hsu, M.D., of the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Evanston, Ill., and colleagues found that young female athletes have a higher rate of concussion than their male counterparts. Specifically, the investigators found that young female soccer players had higher rates of concussion than young male football players after traumatic brain injury (TBI) laws were enacted.

"Physicians and the media have always paid special attention to professional athletes and raising awareness about the risks of concussion, but with increasing involvement in youth sports there is growing evidence we should be more focused on this population, as the potential for long term damage and permanent injuries from one or multiple concussions is alarming," Hsu said.

The investigators evaluated the incidence of concussion diagnosis over the last 10 years and compared rates from prior to and after TBI laws in the United States were established. The researchers found that concussion rates increased over the 10-year period and diagnosis of concussion greatly increased after TBI laws were put into effect.

"We found that females were at higher risk of reported concussions than their male counterparts. Specifically, we also found that young female soccer players were at a higher risk of concussion than young male football players. This finding was the most surprising and the most significant. Concussion diagnosis grew among young female volleyball and male baseball players after TBI laws were put into effect," Hsu said. "Sports other than American football can put adolescent athletes at risk of concussion, especially young female soccer players. It is important to be aware of this risk as we consider preventative measures to reduce the risk of neurologic damage."

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In another study, Michael G. Ciccotti, M.D., of the Rothman Institute and Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, and colleagues found that 45 percent of high school athletes specialize in one sport, which is two years earlier than current college and professional athletes began to specialize in one sport.

The investigators conducted a survey of 3,090 athletes, including those who play high school, collegiate, and professional sports. They questioned the participants about demographics and current sports commitments, as well as whether they were ever injured or ever cared for by a medical professional because of a sports injury.

"We found that current professional athletes began to compete in all types of sports at an earlier age, playing multiple sports throughout the year. We found, though, that the high school athletes decided to specialize at a statistically earlier age -- two years earlier than current professional and collegiate athletes," Ciccotti said. "Furthermore, we found that the high school athletes recalled a statistically higher incidence of injury than the professional and collegiate athletes, and that current professional athletes were less likely to promote early specialization in a single sport."

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David M. Levy, M.D., of the Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, and colleagues found that most patients who took part in recreational or competitive running prior to developing hip bone spurs were able to return to running within nine months of undergoing arthroscopic surgery.

"We showed that arthroscopic hip surgery was effective not only for relieving a patient's symptoms and getting them better but it also got them back to being athletic. The main concern with these patients when they come in is that they are extremely debilitated, and we showed that this procedure not only got them better but was able to get them back to running as well, which is very significant," Levy said. "We mainly studied recreational athletes as compared to professional athletes, who may have more of an impetus to get back to being athletic, which I find even more significant. Therefore, there is value in arthroscopic hip surgery in not only getting patients better but getting them back to recreational sports."

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AAOS: Home Beats Inpatient Rehab Post Joint Arthroplasty

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Patients discharged home from the hospital following hip or knee arthroplasty recover as well as, or better than, those who first go to a rehabilitation center, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, held from March 14 to 18 in San Diego.

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AAOS: Osteoporosis Fractures More Often Fatal for Men

WEDNESDAY, March 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Men are more likely than women to die after an osteoporosis-related fracture, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, held from March 14 to 18 in San Diego.

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AAOS: Informed Decision Making Ups QoL After Orthopedic Surgery

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Patients meeting criteria for informed, patient-centered (IPC) decisions have significantly better quality of life after orthopedic surgery, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, held from March 14 to 18 in San Diego.

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AAOS: SSRI Use Linked to Lower Risk of Revision in THA, TKA

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing total hip (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use is associated with a lower risk of revisions, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, held from March 14 to 18 in San Diego.

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AAOS: Cholesterol, LDL Impact Rotator Cuff Repair Revision

TUESDAY, March 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, the rate of revision surgery is increased for those with moderate or high total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, held from March 14 to 18 in San Diego.

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AAOS: Few Hip Fracture Patients Take Vitamin D Consistently

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of femoral neck patients undergoing surgical fixation with cancellous screw or sliding hip screws do not take vitamin D consistently, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, held from March 14 to 18 in San Diego.

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