AMA: Use American Heart Month to Focus on Patients' BP

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AMA: Use American Heart Month to Focus on Patients' BP
AMA: Use American Heart Month to Focus on Patients' BP

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As part of American Heart Month, physicians are encouraged to focus on patients' blood pressure, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

Physicians should ask three questions when measuring blood pressure: (1) whether patients were rushing or physically active just before the appointment; (2) whether they have been taking their medication; and (3) what kind of diet and physical activity regimen they have. These questions can help physicians to better measure and control blood pressure and improve patients' overall health.

Additional tips for addressing blood pressure have been developed by the AMA, Johns Hopkins Medicine, and physicians in pilot sites across the country, and form part of the M.A.P. checklist, which calls for physicians and care teams to measure accurately, act rapidly, and partner with patients to promote patient self-management. The M.A.P. framework includes other resources, which are products of the AMA's Improving Health Outcomes initiative.

"Make sure your workflow includes these three important questions to better measure and control your patients' blood pressure and help improve their overall health," the report states.

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