AM, PM Cortisol Tied to Brain, Cognitive Variances in Later Life

This article originally appeared here.
Share this content:
AM, PM Cortisol Tied to Brain, Cognitive Variances in Later Life
AM, PM Cortisol Tied to Brain, Cognitive Variances in Later Life

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Evening and morning cortisol levels in older people may be differentially associated with tissue volume in gray and white matter structures and cognitive function, according to a study published online Aug. 19 in Neurology.

Mirjam I. Geerlings, Ph.D., from the National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Md., and colleagues analyzed data from the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study. Participants (4,244; mean age, 76 years; 58 percent women) were without dementia and had 1.5T brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), assessment of cognitive functioning, and saliva collected at home 45 minutes after awakening and at night.

The researchers found that higher evening cortisol was associated with smaller total brain volume, when adjusted for age, sex, education, intracranial volume, smoking, steroid use, white matter lesions, and brain infarcts on MRI. These smaller volumes were found in all brain regions, but were significantly smaller in gray matter compared to white matter regions. Higher evening cortisol was also tied to poorer cognitive functioning across all domains. In contrast, higher levels of morning cortisol were associated with slightly greater normal white matter volume and better processing speed and executive functioning, but were not associated with memory performance.

"Understanding these differential associations may aid in developing strategies to reduce the effects of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction on late-life cognitive impairment," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »


Sign up for myCME e-newsletters


Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease


More in Home

Dermatography Helps Lessen Appearance of Surgical Scars

Dermatography Helps Lessen Appearance of Surgical Scars

Pigments can restore more natural skin appearance that patients are happy with

Drug-Resistant Bacteria Live in America's Water Systems

Drug-Resistant Bacteria Live in America's Water Systems

Bacteria found in plumbing may sicken thousands each year

Deep Brain Stimulation May Improve TBI Symptoms

Deep Brain Stimulation May Improve TBI Symptoms

Deep brain stimulation appears to boost function and quality of life

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »