AHA: Long-Term Use of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy Appears Safe

This article originally appeared here.
Share this content:
AHA: Long-Term Use of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy Appears Safe
AHA: Long-Term Use of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy Appears Safe

(HealthDay News) -- Heart attack and stroke patients can safely take aspirin combined with a second antiplatelet medication for extended periods, contrary to recent findings suggesting otherwise, according to results of a meta-analysis. The research was published online Nov. 16 in The Lancet and presented at the annual meeting of the American Heart Association (AHA), held from Nov. 15 to 19 in Chicago.

Meta-analysis coauthor Laura Mauri, M.D., an associate professor of cardiovascular medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston, was also lead investigator on the Dual Antiplatelet Therapy (DAPT) trial -- also presented at the AHA meeting. DAPT data indicated significant benefits for extending the combination therapy longer than the clinical standard of 12 months in heart attack patients who've received a stent. The combination therapy reduced the risk of heart attack by about half if it was continued for up to 30 months compared with patients only taking aspirin. The dual therapy patients also had a 71 percent reduced risk of in-stent thrombosis.

Despite these positives, DAPT trial patients taking the two drugs also appeared to have a 36 percent increased risk of death during the study period compared with patients taking just aspirin. "We thought it was important to see if there are any major risks we should be concerned about," Mauri told HealthDay. To investigate their concerns, researchers reviewed data from 14 different clinical trials involving combination antiplatelet drug therapy. The trials included nearly 69,644 patients. The analysis found no significant difference in rates of death between people who took the dual therapy for longer than 12 months, compared with people who received either aspirin alone or the dual therapy for shorter periods of time.

The increased death rates in the DAPT study appear to be mainly caused by people with prior diagnoses of cancer being randomly assigned to the patient group receiving combination therapy, Mauri said. When these patients were excluded, the differences in death rate were no longer significant.

The DAPT trial was funded in part by the pharmaceutical industry. Several authors of the meta-analysis disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical companies.

Full Article
Press Release - DAPT
Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
More Information

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

Trending Activities

All Professions



Sign up for myCME e-newsletters


More in Home

Dupilumab Reduces Rate of Severe Asthma Exacerbations

Dupilumab Reduces Rate of Severe Asthma Exacerbations

And, add-on dupilumab reduces glucocorticoid dose in patients with glucocorticoid-treated asthma

Better Social Support Network Protects Black Men Against HIV

Better Social Support Network Protects Black Men Against ...

Social networks of black men who have sex with men influence HIV risk behavior

Recommendations Developed for Managing Postpartum Pain

Recommendations Developed for Managing Postpartum Pain

Impact of medications on mother-infant dyad should be considered, as many women breastfeed

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »