AHA: Fried Food Intake Tied to Heart Failure Risk in Physicians

Share this content:
AHA: Fried Food Intake Tied to Heart Failure Risk in Physicians
AHA: Fried Food Intake Tied to Heart Failure Risk in Physicians

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The more fried food you eat, the greater your risk for heart failure, according to a new study. The findings were scheduled for presentation at the American Heart Association's Epidemiology and Prevention/Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2015 Scientific Sessions, held from March 3 to 6 in Baltimore.

For the study, researchers collected data on 15,362 male doctors who took part in the Physicians' Health Study. The men -- average age 66 at the start of the study -- completed food frequency questionnaires over a three-year period. During an average follow-up of about a decade, 632 developed heart failure.

In this study, men who ate fried food one to three times a week had an average 18 percent increased risk of developing heart failure, researchers found. When fried food was eaten four to six times a week, heart failure risk was 25 percent higher, and at seven times or more weekly, 68 percent greater.

"This study suggests that it might be wise to reduce the frequency and quantity of fried foods consumed weekly in order to prevent heart failure and other chronic conditions," lead researcher Luc Djousse, M.D., an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston, told HealthDay.

Press Release
More Information

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

Trending Activities

All Professions



Sign up for myCME e-newsletters


More in Home

Surveillance Frequency Doesn't Cut Mortality in Colorectal Cancer

Surveillance Frequency Doesn't Cut Mortality in Colorectal Cancer

And, intensity of imaging surveillance not linked to time to detection of colorectal cancer recurrence

Procalcitonin Assay Doesn't Cut Antibiotic Use in Lower RTI

Procalcitonin Assay Doesn't Cut Antibiotic Use in Lower ...

Provision of assay doesn't result in less antibiotic use for suspected lower respiratory tract infection

Preventing Child Maltreatment Not Yet Feasible in Primary Care

Preventing Child Maltreatment Not Yet Feasible in Primary ...

USPSTF says evidence inadequate for primary care interventions to prevent child maltreatment

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »