AAOS: Cholesterol, LDL Impact Rotator Cuff Repair Revision

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AAOS: Cholesterol, LDL Impact Rotator Cuff Repair Revision
AAOS: Cholesterol, LDL Impact Rotator Cuff Repair Revision

TUESDAY, March 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, the rate of revision surgery is increased for those with moderate or high total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, held from March 14 to 18 in San Diego.

Jourdan Michael Cancienne, M.D., from the University of Virginia School of Medicine in Charlottesville, and colleagues examined the correlation between hyperlipidemia and failure of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair requiring revision surgery.

The researchers found that the rate of revision surgery was significantly higher for patients with moderate-to-high versus normal total cholesterol levels (moderate: P = 0.022; high: P = 0.006). This difference was partly explained by patients not prescribed statins; revision rates were not significantly different for patients prescribed statins with moderate or high or with normal total cholesterol levels. Similar results were seen for LDL, with significantly higher rates of revision surgery for patients with moderate or high LDL levels versus normal levels (moderate P = 0.001; high: P = 0.014), and with the difference mainly explained by patients not prescribed statins.

"Patients with moderate or high total cholesterol and LDL levels are at a significantly increased risk for failure of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair requiring revision surgery," the authors write.

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