AAOS: ADHD Meds Tied to Lower Bone Density in Children

This article originally appeared here.
Share this content:
AAOS: ADHD Meds Tied to Lower Bone Density in Children
AAOS: ADHD Meds Tied to Lower Bone Density in Children

FRIDAY, March 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children taking medications for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may have lower bone density than their peers, according to research scheduled to be presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, held from March 1 to 5 in Orlando, Fla.

Jessica Rivera, M.D., orthopedic surgeon with the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, and colleagues used data on 5,315 U.S. children ages 8 to 17 who were part of a government health survey. The prescription medications included stimulants such as Ritalin and Adderall, and nonstimulants, like Strattera.

The team found, overall, lower bone density in the hip and lumbar spine for children on ADHD medications than children not taking them. Overall, about one-quarter of children on the medications had lower-than-normal bone density, Rivera told HealthDay.

"I'm in no way saying that kids shouldn't be on these medications," Rivera said. "This is an early study and it's not something that should change practice."

Abstract
More Information

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »


Sign up for myCME e-newsletters


Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease


More in Home

FDA Approves 'Artificial Pancreas' for Type 1 Diabetes

FDA Approves 'Artificial Pancreas' for Type 1 Diabetes

MiniMed 670G hybrid closed loop system automatically monitors glucose, delivers insulin

More Evidence HPV Vaccine Protects Against Cervical Cancer

More Evidence HPV Vaccine Protects Against Cervical Cancer

Protection appears to occur even when only one or two of the recommended doses are given

Prescribed NSAIDs Tied to Higher Heart Failure Risk

Prescribed NSAIDs Tied to Higher Heart Failure Risk

Study of millions of health records suggests an association

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »