25(OH)D Inversely Linked to Arterial Stiffness in Some Teens

This article originally appeared here.
Share this content:
25(OH)D Inversely Linked to Arterial Stiffness in Some Teens
25(OH)D Inversely Linked to Arterial Stiffness in Some Teens

MONDAY, June 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In lean adolescents and in obese adolescents with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), but not obese adolescents with normoglycemia, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) is inversely associated with some measures of arterial stiffness, according to a study published online May 26 in Diabetes Care.

Pranati Jha, M.B.B.S., from the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati, and colleagues conducted a cross-sectional analysis to examine the correlation between 25(OH)D levels and arterial stiffness in obese youth with and without T2DM. Data were included for 190 youth with T2DM, 190 obese control subjects without T2DM, and 190 lean control subjects without T2DM (mean age, 17.9 ± 3.4 years).

The researchers found that for lean individuals, obese individuals, and obese individuals with T2DM, the mean 25(OH)D levels were 21.27, 14.29, and 14.13 ng/mL, respectively (P < 0.01). From lean to obese to T2DM, pulse wave velocity (PWV), augmentation index (AIx), and brachial distensibility worsened (P < 0.01). 25(OH)D level correlated independently with PWV in lean individuals and with AIx in the group with T2DM; a 3 ng/mL increase in 25(OH)D correlated with a 1 percent decrease in AIx.

"25(OH)D is inversely associated with some measures of arterial stiffness in lean adolescents and obese adolescents with T2DM but not in obese normoglycemic adolescents," the authors write. "Future studies are needed to determine if supplemental 25(OH)D is important for cardiovascular health."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease



Sign up for myCME e-newsletters




More in Home

FDA Approves First Generic Under-the-Tongue Suboxone

FDA Approves First Generic Under-the-Tongue Suboxone

May only be prescribed by Drug Addiction Treatment Act-certified prescribers

Kellogg's Honey Smacks Cereal Recalled Due to Salmonella Risk

Kellogg's Honey Smacks Cereal Recalled Due to <i>Salmonella</i> ...

Twenty-four people have been hospitalized, but no deaths have been reported

Portable Music Player Use Linked to Hearing Loss in Children

Portable Music Player Use Linked to Hearing Loss ...

Increased odds of high-frequency hearing loss with portable music player use

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »