Concussions May Accelerate Alzheimer's Disease Progression

Share this content:
Concussions May Accelerate Alzheimer's Disease Progression
Concussions May Accelerate Alzheimer's Disease Progression

FRIDAY, Jan. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Concussions may be associated with accelerated cortical thickness and memory decline in Alzheimer's disease-relevant areas, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in Brain.

Jasmeet Hayes, Ph.D., an assistant professor of psychiatry at the Boston University School of Medicine, and colleagues examined 160 U.S. veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. The veterans in the study were relatively young, with an average age of 32.

The investigators found that concussions seem to accelerate Alzheimer's disease-related brain deterioration and mental decline in people who are at genetic risk for the disease.

"We found that having a concussion was associated with lower cortical thickness in brain regions that are the first to be affected in Alzheimer's disease," Hayes said in a university news release. "Our results suggest that when combined with genetic factors, concussions may be associated with accelerated cortical thickness and memory decline in Alzheimer's disease-relevant areas."

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »


Sign up for myCME e-newsletters


Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

Trending Activities

All Professions

More in Home

FDA Seeks to Increase Number of Generic Drugs on Market

FDA Seeks to Increase Number of Generic Drugs ...

Agency will now give priority reviews to new generic drugs until there are at least three available

PPIs Not Found to Raise Risk of Alzheimer's Disease

PPIs Not Found to Raise Risk of Alzheimer's ...

New research debunks other studies suggesting that PPIs cause mental decline

Aspirin Effective in Pregnancies at High Risk for Preeclampsia

Aspirin Effective in Pregnancies at High Risk for ...

Odds of preeclampsia drop for high-risk women who take 150 mg of aspirin daily, researchers find

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »